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Arts and Humanities - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Arts and Humanities, and find Arts and Humanities experts.
Questions related to Arts and Humanities
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Share your thoughts...
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"What am I doing here, on Earth?"
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I would really appreciate some broad and basic descriptions of what constitutes these types of contributions to knowledge, specifically, if possible, in relation to social science/humanities disciplines - everything I've found online relates to applied or medical sciences, and I'm finding them hard to apply to my research!
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Researchers are engaged in conducting research in diverse areas such as Science, Technology, Medicines, Arts, Humanities and many more. Many researchers are doing interdisciplinary research.
While conducting research, there are likely to be similarities and differences in research approach and methodology.
In your opinion, what are the similarities and differences in approach and methodology for research in Science, Technology, Medicines, Arts, Humanities and other areas ?
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In any dynamic system from molecules, to stars or people or money or any other system, the same law seems to apply: Movement is proportional to a driving force or a motivation and inversely proportional to a resistance.
Movement = Driving force / Resistance
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What are the factors that influence to improve human personality?
I think, At first we need to know "Who am I? or Who I want to be?
Then, take an action to making change.
Being confident.
Positive thinking is another important point I think.
What are the others factors??
Open discussion.
Regards.
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There are three important factors:
1. Biological factors: The biological factors include genetic, hereditary factors, physical appearance and physique and rate of maturation.
2. Cultural determinant: All human beings live in a society, an interacting group of people and each society has a distinctive culture, a body of stored knowledge, characteristic way of thinking, feeling attitudes, goals, ideals and value system.
3. Family influence: The child’s first social learning occurs at home, and his earliest experiences with his family, particularly his mother, are critical in determining his attitude toward—and his expectations of—other individuals.
JCR 2017 Impact Factor List. Update?
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Thomson Reuters (formerly ISI) Web of Knowledge is a premier research platform for information in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Impact Factors are calculated yearly for journals indexed in Thomson Reuter's Journal Citation Index. It is a measure of the frequency with which the "average article" in a journal has been cited in a particular year or period. Journals List: https://www.revistacomunicar.com/pdf/revistasJCR.pdf
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thank you for sharing
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Why do people fall in love with their works / creative works ?
Also why it is necessary??
Is it only for money, fame, habit, competition, nature or others??
Open discussion.
Regards
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True dedication makes you to love your work. If someone involves himself in his work whole heartedly then you say that he loves his work.
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Why?
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both are necessary but I think deep technical knowledge of her/ his board can help student to achieve better result and getting progress.
Why women researchers always be more beautiful than men?
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Beautiful people are indeed happier, a new study says, but not always for the same reasons. For handsome men, the extra kicks are more likely to come from economic benefits, like increased wages, while women are more apt to find joy just looking in the mirror. “Women feel that beauty is inherently important,” says Daniel Hamermesh, a University of Texas at Austin labor economist and the study’s lead author. “They just feel bad if they’re ugly.”
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Who makes women beautiful? actually a beautiful thought of a man :) otherwise women never impressed by women rather they generally feel jealous from each other :)
Are you agree with this say "intellegents are full of doubts while idiots are full of certainties"?
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Is it a general behaviour or no?
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Yes I agree with the statement that "intelligent people are full of doubts while idiots are full of certainties. It was stated by Charles Bokowaski.
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Where can one find the most up-to-date and comprehensive list of journals in the humanities (esp. philosophy and literary studies) that should be avoided because of their unwarranted publication fees, shoddy or fraudulent refereeing practices, and absence of digital preservation policies?
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This question include all sort of arts : fine arts, visual arts, dance, theater, performances, architecture, cinema, videos, etc.
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Boundaries are basically a definition (the literal sense of the word). Definition gives shape and coherence, and with that meaning. If we all come with our own personal ideas of what 'art', or any other concept for that matter, should be, the result is chaos...
To find what the boundaries of art are (and to see how elastic they can become), it may help to ask the opposite question: what is NOT art?
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Dear Respected RG Members,
Naghar Pathan is the prominent Pakhtoons tribe who played the important role in the different Indo-Pak-Afghan dynasties. The less literature is available about the history of this tribe. In the different regions the spell of the tribe is also change i.e naghar, nagar, naghar pathan etc.
Please share the informations about this tribe to answer the followinf question.i.e
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I m naghar ghorfhashti from India settled in Pakistan the history is available at wikipedia
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How can we best serve Humanity?
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Dear Dr Rai
First of all try to be a real human which means become truly human only when
We try to make others secure, comfortable and happy. To go beyond one’s own self and serve others is social service. Such statements as“To serve humanity is to serve God” and “Service before Self”, bring out the importance of social service.
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See the following link for a description of graph databases https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graph_database
It seems that such data bases and the benefits they provide for analysis have primarily been used in business, basic science and in examination of social interactions, e.g. social networks. It would be helpful to know about other uses such in the humanities.
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Try the links:
DASCH: Data and Service Center for the Humanities | Digital ...
Even Sweeter: What happens when the humanities gets graphic - Deb ...
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I started videoblog about culture and science recently on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oqrctt4zh3A&t=10s). Would you like to share with me your experience on vlogs and how to improve transmission of knowledge through YT?
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It is a great initiative!Using words, pictures and interactive videos is one of the efficient means of utilizing technology in the sharing of knowledge. Congratulations my brother. Many of us would mimic your footsteps.
My little caution is to verify facts you want to present in the videos as we do in research (Validity)and practice what you intend to post via knowledge sharing to rid it of all possible mistakes. All the best.
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House Bill 5 Establishes endorsements in five categories:
(1) STEM
(2) Business and Industry
(3) Public Services
(4) Arts and Humanities
(5) Multidisciplinary
How has this impacted student stress, focus, or pressure and how has it influenced your classroom teaching?
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good luck sir
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Of course, except from SCI and SCI-Expanded.
Emerging Sources Citation Index
As a new index in the Web of Science™ Core Collection, Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI) expands the citation universe and reflects the growing global body of science and scholarly activity. ESCI.complements the highly selective indexes by providing earlier visibility for sources under evaluation as part of SCIE, SSCI, and AHCI’s rigorous journal selection process. Inclusion in ESCI provides greater discoverability which leads to measurable citations and more transparency in the selection process.
About Scopus
Scopus is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature: scientific journals, books and conference proceedings. Delivering a comprehensive overview of the world's research output in   the fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and arts and humanities, Scopus features smart tools to track, analyze and   visualize research.
As research becomes increasingly global, interdisciplinary and collaborative, you can make sure that critical research from around the world is not missed when you choose Scopus.
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Sci>scie>esci>scopus
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Dear ResearchGate members:
So far, the researchgate database is based on massive pool, the field of researchers are not segregated. Meaning that we do not know who belongs which research fields unless we read their publications. So the RG score also does not discriminate which fields you are.
Is it possible to segregate the authors based on their research field such as:
Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Arts and Humanities
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Business, Management and Accounting
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Computer Science
Decision Sciences
Dentistry
Earth and Planetary Sciences
Economics, Econometrics and Finance
Energy
Engineering
Environmental Science
Health Professions
Immunology and Microbiology
Materials Science
Mathematics
Medicine
Multidisciplinary
Neuroscience
Nursing
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics
Physics and Astronomy
Psychology
Social Sciences
Veterinary
So that the researchers can subscribe to their own fields , this is just my suggestions. Comments and feedback are welcomed.
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There is some research out there about why students select a certain study area and discipline that leads to their choice of research area and academic discipline. Why did you select STEM subjects (hard science) or non-STEM such as arts/humanities?
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A beautiful question, I do not know how you thought about it.
When I was a little child, I heard about cancer and the and I repeated in myself: I will find a cure for cancer. This led me to study science... . But why I studied in the specialty (chemistry) this is 'Act of God'.
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Dear RG researchers
Do you like to be the one millionth supporter for the move on Global Peace Flag Bearer Beyond the Borders (GPFB3)?
It is requested that the researchers from all fields of research should contribute to stand against WAR throughout the world.
With best regards
Ijaz
Research Fields:
-Engineering and Technology
-Medicines
-Sciences
-Arts and Humanities
etc
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Arts and Humanities
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Art pivots the field of engineering and must be woven in all the courses taught. Yet, it is sad to reckon that few traces of Art is in engineering. However, for the training of engineers to be effective, there is the need to take students rigorously through the principles of design, layout, construction, colour schemes, molding and forming techniques, idea development, and all the elements in engineering that requires deep thinking. Indeed, the issue is not with percentages of Art in engineering courses but art should be intertwined in all the modules and courses taught.
Thanks
Dickson Adom
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What mean by to be powerful.and if you be powerful that's mean you couldn't be humansen
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Thank you for all of you for these contribution.
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In my opinion all high school students all over the world must learn latin and greek prefixes and suffixes to a considerable level as a seperate lesson because almost all natural sciences, medical sciences, social sciences, humanity courses use these words which are combinations of prefixes and suffixes. Once the students learn these they will have much more deeper and broader understanding and evaluating capacity both in their education and posteducation life.
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Maybe a separate course is not necessary, but as you have rightly observed, Latin and Greek roots play a vital role in lexical development and a supplementary pedagogical module on this can fortify possibilities of success in vocabulary teaching courses.
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Is it really necessary to teach unscientific knowledges of humanities to STEM students ? In Europe such as UK, Germany, France etc STEM students just learn their related STEM courses so that they can graduate in 3 years whereas in US 4 years. Since1 more year of tuition and living and starting 1 year late in job is a considerable loss of time and finance to students and their parents. These issues must be considered in favour of students who accumulate so much loan debts rather than US universities and relate academics.
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German technical universities also urge students to join some non-technical courses as integral part of their studies (humanities, social sciences, economics). This is due to modern principles of differentiated, competency-orientated curriclum design and to the idea of engineering education as a consequence of WW2 and Nazism after 1945. Basically, concepts of comprehensive and diverse engineering education are being favored, implying a core of scientific knoledge. Anyway, unscientific knowledge should not not take first place in any subject in academia, I guess, neither in STEM nor in any other subject.
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The common view is that it does, but recently this view has been challenged. For example Prum (2013):
"Current concepts of art cannot exclusively circumscribe the human arts from many forms of non-human biotic art. Without assuming an arbitrarily anthropocentric perspective, any concept of art will
need to engage with biodiversity, and either recognize many instances of biotic advertisements as art, or exclude some instances of human art."
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I recommend the book by Desmond Morris "The artistic ape". Although Morris is best known as a zoologist (or so it was in my case) he is also a painter. The book is well written, nicely organised, and includes beautiful illustrations.
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Many scientists lived who have milestone the world with his studies from past to present. Which scientist has been a role model for you through his studies or his behavior? Which have their properties, behaviors, inventions or principles, etc., leading to you or your studies? For example, "Karl Popper's Basic Scientific Principle Falsifiability" is rule to me. Karl Popper is defining the inherent testability of any scientific hypothesis by this principle.
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Newton.Einstein.DBoehm.RFeynmann.
What is human cruelty?
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What is human cruelty? Please give an example.
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Cruelty is the deliberate infliction of agonizing (mental and physical) pain by perpetrators on their victims. Cruelty is a special intention, because it is controlled by the will and the mind, to inflict the highest possible pain on another person or group of people for an unlimited time (or until the death of the victim). animals are not cruel. Cruelty is the most abominable form of human aggression.
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The world is beset by dozens of violent conflicts. Thousands lose their lives to war and terrorism every year. How can the sciences, arts or humanities lead to World Peace? Which disciplines best lend themselves to the pursuit of World Peace? How might inter-disciplinary approaches be manifested?
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Thank you to all who reply to this query. At the end of my academic career, I answered the question -- how to use social psychology to pursue World Peace -- in the last course that I taught at Pitzer College.
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Are citation chances for researches in pure sciences more likely than researches in humanities to hit a high score?!
Of course you'll get cited when you write a good research, but based on observation I noticed that researches in sciences like physics, biology, mathematics,...etc get more citations even though some researchers come from a not very robust academic background!
Thank you for sharing your opinion!
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Muthana - it is, as you point out variable, but researchers in pure science disciplines do seem to have an advantage over those in social sciences/humanities. Often, this is because the journals are more 'historical' and established - so have 'worked hard' at improving and targeting. As a result they can be more competetive as well - and so can cream the best submissions off the top. A classic example would be people striving to publish in Science or Nature. Many high-ranking journals center on certain disciplines - such as medicine - which routinely employ experimental designs etc. These are seen by many as more citable as the outcomes are often viewed as 'black and white' - even if they may not actually be so.
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Many colleagues are receiving certificates of association (and appreciation). What do you think about? Are they useful?
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El-Sayed El-Aswad Thanks for your answer: It depends on the association
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Relanzamos este post, con los datos actualizados extraídos del Master List de Web of Science en fecha del 6/12/2015, pensando especialmente en los profesores que tienen que acreditar la calidad de sus revistas en el proceso de sexenios que comienza mañana.
Thomson Reuters lanza un nuevo órdago a la mesa. Si hace un año aumentaba la cobertura de Web of Science con las revistas de Scielo e incluía la base de datos Scielo Citation Index, ahora, crea un nuevo producto, Emerging Source Citation Index, que vió la luz en Noviembre. Emerging Source Citation Index (ESCI) consiste en una base de datos dónde están todas las revistas que en la práctica están siendo evaluadas para entrar a formar parte de las bases de datos de Web of Science Core Collections (Science Citation Index,Social Science Citation Index y Arts & Humanities Citation Index). Por tanto no estamos realmente ante un nuevo producto, sino ante la explotación pública de la base de datos que utilizaban los analistas de Web of Science para realizar el seguimiento de aquellas revistas que optaban a entrar en los productos de evaluación de revistas más exigentes (Core Collections). Esto añade transparencia al proceso y hace públicas las métricas de estas revistas. Thomson se postula como el producto de evaluación de revistas con un mayor número de cabeceras.
Emerging Source Citation Index empieza con  2400 revistas de 82 países, lo que amplía mucho la cobertura, en un claro ejemplo del interés de Thomson Reuters por mejorar la presencia de áreas sub-representadas en el producto. No obstante, los cinco países con mayor presencia en ESCI son anglosajones (Inglaterra, USA, Canadá, Países Bajos e Italia). La presencia Iberoamericana en el producto es secundaria, y sin embargo, porcentualmente es el producto de Thomson Reuters, si obviamente descartamos Scielo Citation Index, donde nuestras revistas tienen una mayor presencia. En presencia se sitúa España la sexta con 165 revistas y Brasil la octava con 81.
Que opinan de esto ante Conacyt para el SNI??????
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Emerging Sources Citation Index is part of WoS core collection, but without impact factor. Journal Lists for Searchable Databases
  • Web of Science Core Collection
  1. Arts & Humanities Citation Index
  2. Science Citation Index Expanded
  3. Social Sciences Citation Index
  4. Emerging Sources Citation Index
Social science in today' society
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Undoubtedly, the medical sciences, chemistry, materials sciences, engineering, etc., have always played a fundamental role in the evolution of man and society. Also the human and social sciences have had equal relevance, although their recognition probably was later. What would be the role of a scientific researcher in the social sciences in today's society? Can we say that this role has changed compared to other historical periods?
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you want to say that the importance of an investigation lies in the budget that you get from the government? I agree that the government can set priorities on the issues and this is reflected in the budget allocated. However, is the government the arbitrator to decide which science is important to society and which is not? let's talk about it ...
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Who are they?
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Iranian painting is as old as human history. Since the presence of humans in the caves to the present. This painting has been in various styles and schools in historical times. Some of the most important contemporary painters in Iran are Aydin Aghdashloo, Mahmoud Farshchian, Morteza Momayez, Nami Petgar and Hannibal Alkhas.
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Do you believe in phenomenon telepathy?
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Dear Friends and Colleagues of RG
In my opinion, this is not a matter of faith. Telepathy is already scientifically explained. Unfortunately, knowledge in this field is still incomplete and unordered. Driving research is difficult. On the other hand, there is already a lot of data, recorded cases of telepathy, precisely described situations in which examples of telepathy have been recorded, that it is no longer pseudoscience only documented knowledge about specific facts. It is necessary to continue research in this field. It should be examined whether the occurrence of telepathy is influenced to the greatest extent by people's personal characteristics, predispositions or rather the factors responsible for the existence of telepathy are various external factors occurring in the environment of people who are telepaths.
Best wishes
What is ART for you now, your understanding of Art?
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Answer by: •Too general •Somewhat better •Do even better by providing detail about what you mean •Do even better by elaborating •Do even better by contrasting two ideas Do even better by providing examples
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axiom: A = A Art (A) = Art (A)
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I want to gather field data on my research thesis and I am seeking for recommendations on any offline digital tool (app) which i can use to gather data of my questionnaire.
I am familiar with qualtrics, Survey monkey and Google forms but they all need internet connection and a smart phone/pc in order to fill the questionnaire or survey.
So I need an offline app to collect data from the respondents personally.
Any suggestion?
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You might try:
Survey Monkey does have an offline feature:
Hope this helps.
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I am astounded by the number of people who simply copy-and-paste their answers verbatim from various webpages and present the material as if it is their own; even more astounding is the number of senior academics who do this. This is not only dishonest but a disservice to researchers who might have been interested in going to the source for more information if the source had been provided.
What are the reasons behind this phenomenon and what can be done about it?
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Dear Karl Pfeifer , I do fight such examples of plagiarism via my answers under many threads. Researchgate has informed me that they do not act any more on this matter. So, as before RG profiles of such people were banned, such practice is not performed any more. I do block the researchers who do massive copy/paste plagiarism, and I do mention in as a reason. Everyone should point out such bad practice of plagiarism.
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This is in regards to something odd that has happened to me several times. I post an answer to a question. An hour or so later an answer appears before mine that wasn't there at the time I posted my answer. In one case it was a better answer than mine and I wouldn't have bothered posting if I had seen it.
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I recall one incident where this has happened to me also. At the time, I thought it was due to me not refreshing the page for some time before posting. In general, I have noticed that RG has some - shall we say - difficulties with its software.
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Works of art are an important element of culture in the social and cultural heritage. The achievements of culture, including works of art, should be cherished for future generations, they can not be allowed to be forgotten, and unfortunately it often happens that in the era of current informational technological revolution, the development of new media, in the pursuit of modernity specific aspects of culture, tradition and art they are often interpreted only in the historical dimension.
On the other hand, new information technologies, new online media should be used to promote traditional values ​​of culture and art. For example, websites have been created for many art and culture. Many works of art, entire collections of many museums are digitized in the form of a digital record of reproduction of works of art so as to increase the accessibility of citizens to cultural and cultural heritage.
Does this type of propagation of culture and art on the Internet should be developed?
I think so.
Do you agree with me?
Please, answer, comments.
I invite you to the discussion.
Best wishes
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Respected RG Colleagues,
I am following a question about the compartmentalizing of thought.  This relates to C. P. Snow's "two cultures" of science and the humanities.
Humanities scholars and philosophers of science such as Paul Feyerabend ask how  some scientists shut off their moral sense when doing work such as creating chemical or nuclear weaponry.  The discussion often devolves into moralizing over a lack of ethics on the part of individuals or groups.
But what if some males in the extreme male intelligence group have a corollary of no empathy for the effects of their work upon others?  This Professor of Psychiatry at Cambridge University, Simon Baron-Cohen, suggests a different rating system of IQ that has gender skewing (not to say a person of a given gender cannot end up in the other gender's scores.)
A wide battery of questions were submitted to subjects in various demographic groups that yielded the following break-down.  Some perceptual questions and visual puzzles were included such as figure-ground distractibility (focus only on figure or notice ground around figure,) which is a highly significant question for taking in society as a factor.
Systematizers (thing-oriented and focused to tunnel vision) tend to be male responders and Empathic people tend to be female responders.  The gradations of "S" vs. the 'E' intelligence.
Employers may selectively hire those who are least able to apply ethical standards to what they do.  The extreme S-type whether they are biologically M or F, since some females end up in the M spectrum for the condition.
I have been in touch with the author but do not as yet have permission to share this essay so get it through your institution's library.
I hope that some here will read this article so that we may discuss possibilities for social responses in relation to the teaching of writing and rhetoric to teaching of science.  Also,
I am interested in hearing from those who are researching in this area.
Most grateful for any comments,
Gloria McMillan
Citation:
Baron-Cohen, Simon. "The Extreme Male Brain Theory of Autism."  Trends in Cognitive Science 6.6 (June 2002): 248-54.
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Mainz, Germany
Dear Mcmillan,
My inclination, initially at least, is to question the apparent supposition of your themes to the effect that generalized empathy is a condition of ethical standing or behavior. It seems that this would put in question the entire stoic tradition and its influence down to the present day. I think that a very unlikely consequence for general acceptance. Some schools of ethical though put a great deal of weight on empathy, while others would tend to preserve it for the private sphere. I take it that their are some political consequences of the differences--though they should not be over emphasized.
More generally, perhaps, I am inclined also to question the generalized use of the categories of gender stereotypes in relation to ethical inclinations and predispositions. This would seem to invoke or suggest various sorts of prejudices without regard to more differentiated analysis and reflection.
More to the point is that educated people should avoid narrowing themselves into exclusive and monolithic concern with their own narrow special interests and the fashions and obsessions of particular fields of study--let alone the trends induced by the star-system of the specialized academic fields. The traditional cure for monomania is a broad liberal education --and the occasional foray into unfamiliar intellectual territory.
If you will take a look at my approach to Arthur Eddington in my recent edition of his book, The Nature of the Physical World, then I think you may find there something of my approach to criticism of Eddington's subjectivism--which reflects some of what I say above. The idea is that Eddington's actual interests were too narrow--pretty much just mathematics and physics--to serve him well, even in his popular approach to those topics. 
See:
H.G. Callaway
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 I have the newly arrived JCR of SCI and SSCI, but need JCR of journals indexed in Arts & Humanities Citation Index.Is it possible to email it to me?
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Hello Ali Akbar Khasseh 
please check the link
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I recently published this journalistic piece in a forum called The Conversation: https://theconversation.com/a-farewell-to-arts-on-philosophy-arc-funding-and-waste-19064
It's been getting quite a bit of interest so I thought I'd post it here as well. Australia seems to have an annual debate about Arts funding -- around the time when the Australian Research Council Grants are advertised. It is usually a debate between people who think all arts funding is a "waste" of public money, and academics who defend themselves from attack by claiming everything they do is important. In this paper I try to steer between the Scylla and Charybdis of the following propositions: P: "All Arts Funding is wasteful (not necessary) and Not P: "All Arts Funding is not wasteful (necessary).
I'd appreciate any comments you have.
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The first point of view: In general, I agree with the classification of economics as a humanitarian science. There is a theory that the type of science is determined by the one who created the problem. If problem was created by people, then – humanitarian science (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_science); if by nature – then natural science.
The second point of view: Natural science (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_science), from this point of view, can be called the science, which has an objective thing, relatively independent of the consciousness of the scientist.
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Economics is both a positive science as well as a normative science. The former conception is close to it being a natural science. Here we want to know what impacts what in the economy and why. All focus is on causality, which helps develop the analytical power of the learner and to expand the economic concepts to serve the particular needs of a particular economy/country or the globe (in case of IMF and World Bank, for example)
Economics as a normative (humanitarian) science studies the models and approaches that should be adopted so as to realize particular economic and social goals e.g. higher economic growth, poverty alleviation, lower Ginni coefficient, better investment climate, growth with social justice, etc.
To conclude, economics is both.
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I am trying to analyse how bodies presented in contemporary religious movies are becoming increasingly 'sexy' so I am just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on some theoretical work or past research work on such a topic.
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i think this goes along way in defining so deeply, the concept of religion and culture.since some religious traditions permit holy sex, then the society should simply be given a critical look so one can really trace the history of such holy and erotic adventure
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I enjoy chinese calligraphy,and practice a lot in my spare time since 10 years old. As we all kown,the traditional chinese calligraphy is the art of black and white. This is an attempt and innovation. According to the artistic conception of the work,thereafter dyeing rice papers with colourant(Color,is the most expressive element of art ). More colorful calligraphy works would emerge. Maybe it's a good or bad try,it depends on whether it can meet a wider range of aesthetic taste all over the world. Which do you like better? Any contribution is greatly appreciated.
P.S. The literal meaning of the works below: Live as long as the pine tree and the red-crowned crane. (more colorful work). The sound of Bamboo collision, meanwhile the pine tree's shadow mapping to the ground.(black and white work)
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artist Song Nian(Qing Dynasty) said, One man's handwritings are beautiful and elegant, can reflect that person's good character, integrity and seriousness. Not only everyone likes his calligraphy artwork, admire and respect this person as well.
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We are faced with more and more commonly used technologies to parametrize scientific value of our publications with using tools (IF, citation number, Hirsch index) completely not adequate to estimation of real scientific value of particular publications. Also books are treated in this "celebrity show" as secondary products, despite of this that their input to science might be several times more important than single publication in journal with high IF. What will be future of science, if we totally agree with using of completely not adequate methods to measure our scientific discoveries?
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What ever happened to quality? Quantity has replaced it! Why? because quality can't be quantified. My advice is to go your own way, and let people try to measure you however they like. Let them waste their time measuring the meaningless ...
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A recent Pew Poll suggests that "Americans support scientists but just don't want to listen to them, how can we improve communication by say shifting from a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) focus, to one that includes the arts and humanities (STEAM, with the A symbolizing the Arts and Humanities)?
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Dear Kato,
Normally I don't like the use of acronyms, especially when they are used in abundance and particularly when they are not defined. 
But you've "nailed it" with STEAM and it sounds better and is more impactful than STEM!  Congratulations and thank you!  Perhaps I'm biased since my field is in the humanities.  At the moment I don't have an answer for how to make the shift from STEM to STEAM but I'll think about it and come back. 
There's a thread that is related to this.  Use the RG search box to find it with words like science, engineering, humanities; I hope that will do it.
Tip:  To get more distribution for your question go back to it and edit the tags/topics.  Add those that have a high number of followers:  higher education, higher education teaching, science, scientific, engineering, math, secondary education, etc.  Delete the topics love, steam, polls, hate. 
What do you think about literature of science?
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Most of us, if not all, in RG have publications. I think every article started with an idea, which we live as humans, and scientists. have you ever thought to write these moments beyond these ideas? I think that this benefits and encourage the others to read, and view the stories of such ideas to become achievements. an example illustrating this idea, an author may write a book involving his studies and the events beyond. what do you think about this idea? thanks in advance
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It is a great pity that scientists do not more often leave the stuffy world of peer publication to write something more innovative and stimulating.  the world of scientific publishing is stifling, starchy, pretentious and often filled with rubbish masquerading as science.  If scientists wrote with am little soul many more people would follow them. Look at the great success of the TV and Media scientists who in a few TV programmes have brought more science to more people that even the most prolific journal author.
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I would like to learn from your scholarly experiences in blending DH into your areas of scholarship and/or practice of archiving and librarianship.  Humanities (including DH) has been an interdisciplinary field.  How have the arts and humanities informed your particular research in science, engineering, medicine, social science, and other fields? 
Are you working (or have you worked) with archives and digital libraries with multi-, inter-, cross- or transdisciplinary research material?   For clarification of these terms, please consult Julie Thompson Klein's works on interdisciplinarity, which not only define these terms but place them in the proper context of scientific research.  How did you assign subject headings to develop an ontology to represent your materials? 
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I was forgetting something else. The issue mentioned in my previous comment does not go without saying. The social, political and economical hurdles that arise in the middle of both digital humanities and computation social sciences (not to mention generative social science) is the digital divide. This means the division (and their entailments) between those who have access to the ICT (and the NBICS) techs, and those who do not.
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The International Commission on the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (ICAF) invite proposals for papers exploring “Food, Internet and Social Media”. The aim of this conference will be the phenomenon of food culture in the age of virtualization and the virtual relationship around the social networks. Internet shows and shares our global and local preferences and our virtual habits reveal our food manners, social and ethnic identities, new behavioural patterns, eating habits... New categories related to Food as “Foodporn”, “Gastrosphere” “(virtual) Foodies”, “Instafood”, etc. emerges in a number of websites devoted to food aesthetics, wines, food and wine tourism, restaurant reviews, food production and consumption, healthy diets and nutrition...
This conference aims to be an opportunity to discuss the global-local influence of the Internet and the virtual social media on the state of Food Culture and cultures. We invite participants to present their research on relevant subjects looking for an interdisciplinary approach that will reveal important aspects of the conference theme.
We encourage participants interested in this conference to submit an abstract for consideration. We welcome papers with anthropological, sociological, historical, nutritional, geographic or economic perspectives, as well as approaches from Health Sciences, Tourism, Enterprise, etc.
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I would like to ask a very general question and one to which I have never heard an adequate reply. What is art? What makes art art?
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The Spanish Dictionary says: "Manifestation of human activity by means of which the real is interpreted or imagined with plastic, linguistic or sound resources". I like this point of view: 
  • Human activity: exclusive for the humans.
  • The real is interpreted or imagined: 
Imaginary and social representations come into play
  • Plastic, linguistic or sound resources: Which are the basis for different types of art: painting, dance, sculpture, poetry...
To this definition we could add that, to be considered art, these human activities must provoke some feeling
Is there anyone studying Carl Michelstaedter and the Italian Philosophy?
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I wrote on Carl Michelstaedter and would like to start a discussion about.
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Within the ideas of deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism are there robust cultural alternatives to commercial forestry, parks, and conservation plans? Are these ideas - primarily - embodied and tested in the policy and planning of forest landscapes anywhere in the world?
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I think an important aspect to remember is that all of these aspects are social concepts, and subject to social interpretation. But none-the-less here would be my answers.
Ecofeminism is the easiest one. The best forest management would be none at all, for what rights do we have to impose on the desires of the forest to make itʻs own choices.
Deep ecology, the best management would again be none at all, for true ecology is the natural response to outside forces, and therefore whatever the forest will do on its own will be the deepest ecology.
Social ecology is the hardest, because it would rely purely on the interpretation of what is most needed for the society. In my own home it would be a mix of managing a continuous covered forest for food (hunting), water resources, medicinal gathering, conservation, and recreation (hiking).
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For automatically building a corpus of literary text with metadata.
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This should help you get the texts and metadata (but no annotations though).
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How do you cope with rejection of your research paper by impact factor journals?
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Rejection of articles with reputable journals does not necessarily mean your work is not good. I mainly may have two reasons if you have put sinciere efforts on preparing your paper. First of all , your paper might not fit to their scope. In this case you will get a quick rejection. If that's the case try to find a suitable house for your work. As a good indicator, the one which you cited the most , is the most related journal to your paper.
The other reason may be that your paper is not ready yet. It may be due to the stage of your thesis. Most of good journals require full research paperd. This doesn't mean a paper from the whole study, but a paper covering one objective and of course with primary data. If you do not have it yet, please be patient, until you get to that point.
The other meaning of not being ready is you have not structured your good work well. This rejection is a good opportunity, to take on board the comments, and improve your work. Don't be disappointed, juts submit to another journal. Do it until getting acceptance.
I hope it could help.
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In the Humanities, what is it about secondary sources that can make them so undesirable? Perhaps it is partly due to "straw-man" characterizations, and partly because they tend to be written in such a way where the author does the thinking and the reader does the memorizing.
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Any serious researcher in the Humanities and in all other disciplines consider secondary sources indispensable, not "undesirable" at all. Secondary sources inform the scholar what ground has already been covered and point to what still needs to be covered in the future. The reason that UNDERGRADUATE teachers discourage use of secondary sources is to avoid plagiarism. If I thought that the research I do is "undesirable," I would renounce the use of my electronic pen forever.
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Do current academic institutions leave room for anymore to be truly eclectic in their academic practice? Very many of us enjoy and find great reward from reading outside of our specialised academic fields. We also often find utility in inter-disciplinary collaborations. However, do pressures exist within our educational systems, for example, the pressures for tenure in the US that discourage us to truly immerse ourselves and work broadly and across disciplines? Does specialisation mean that we tend to read and think narrowly within our disciplinary areas? Conversely, does the easier access afforded by the internet and communication technologies facilitate greater access to information and collaboration outside of our disciplines?
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If one is pragmatic and focused exclusively on his/her carrier and in on being more rapidly promoted, specialization in a given field definitely works better. However, for me this is a rather boring and not satisfying approach. During the last over 20 years, I have changed several times my research interests and, respectively, the countries/institutions, where I could have explored them. This has given me obviously more work, but also broader knowledge and more satisfaction. Well, this was on the price of not rising to the boss (director) chairs, because the highly specialized and not (or much less) "distracted" people have had already occupied these positions in the given places. In any case, I do nor regret my choice and it would be the same, if I were to restart everything from the beginning :-).
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Are there pressures within our educational systems that work against the development of academics and thinkers who delve broadly across disciplines in their research and writings? Does specialisation ensure that we all all reading and thinking narrowly within our disciplinary areas or does the open access of information across the internet mean that we are all becoming more interdisciplinary? I would be interested to hear your thoughts.
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I would agree with the quote from Sara Louise, and more so. People are now so narrow they do not even understand the scope of their own subspeciality and as a result not only re-invent wheels, but mostly square ones! But I also think you have answered your own question Paul with the two options - and it is both. I am interested in the overlap of visual art perception and neuroscience. I have degrees in Fine Art, Medical Science and Immnopathology but only because I was one of the last generation in the UK to be allowed to wander through subjects as an undergraduate - forty years ago. The interesting problem for the current century is the direct relation between physical dynamics and phenomenal experience. At the moment the division of disciplines is almost totally crippling the project. On the other hand there are internet based groups who are learning from each other in 'Renaissance-style' debate. The academic machine is a moribund white elephant but a new phoenix of free creative thought may just rise from the ashes. But maybe it was ever thus - the demographics of learning have changed but maybe not the critical dynamics.
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Last year I participated in a group project concerning professional paths of young PhD (we exclude people who started to work at universities after graduation). It seems that PhD studies are better accepted in science, economy etc. - in those sectors it was easier to find a satisfactory job. What is your opinion about that?
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I lecture in business studies and employability, and I would say there's a number of parts to that answer:
1) There IS a belief that those coming from humanities lack skills (at least compared to science-y people) in numerical and quantitative methods. Although there's a lot of people who know nothing about numbers or even 'meaning' in business, it's still a prejudice, that those who are heavyweights in business, are those who can crunch numbers. I think that this is the biggest killer when it comes to looking at prospective students - it happens with sciences too, but it is almost inevitably assumed with humanities.
2) There is also a belief, from my experience, that the product of a humanities course is of less value than the product of science. That's probably less a business thing, and more a societal thing. Although businessmen, especially those in academia, should be able to 'value the intangibles', most of the time they haven't got a clue. Something from the sciences almost always looks like engineering can turn it into something useful, so it wins easily whether it should or not.
3) Business is not one 'homogenous' blob. There are areas far more likely to value the humanities, areas particularly in marketing and PR, corporate journalism and communications, human resources, etc. where communications and peoples skills are probably valued more. I would expect that you would find it far easier to excite people in these areas rather than the stuff on strategy and finance. Of course, the same issue applies to organisations. Businesses like museums and arts charities, etc. may love arts and humanities graduates, whereas a medical or engineering firm may well ask, why?
4) I think there is a lot of criticism of academia in education now anyway. The MBA which used to be the mark of the expert manager has been eroded by a) popularity, b) organisations not wanting to pay the premium salary the qualification attracts, and c) some serious questions about what the actual benefit an MBA brings. I would say that PhDs are extremely unlikely to be valued, in any subject (even management), since they are considered remote from outcome. I know a lot of people that will simply bin an application with PhD on it on the basis that they are going to be unhelpful to the organisation through unattainable expectations, theory when action is due or just irrelevance to most organisations objectives. The DBA, as a professional doctorate, is still not really established enough or proven yet, and I suspect is unlikely to ever be in anything but academic circles.
5) Analogical reasoning and creativity is a real premium at the moment, and is probably a far easier sell (and potentially a much better developed talent) in the field of humanities than it is in traditional routes in. This is probably because we all get taught the same thing, so persuasive cases for other things is much welcomed, especially in 'enlightened' organisations.
6) What I always say to my students who are looking at employability (and these are the employers of the future, MBAs not far off qualifying) is to suppose that they are faced with two candidates, one who has all the qualifications, experience, etc. in the world and another who has none. The real question is not the number of certificates, or the employment record or anything in fact other than: can the person do the job, will the person do the job and does the person fit with the values of the organisation. The rest is really only helpful in evidencing one of those three, and I would never choose an MBA over a PhD in humanities, if the latter met those criteria and the former didn't. That's pretty obvious, so your 'handicap' is that most people actually have useless systems that encourage the wrong people to apply, be selected and inappropriate evidence to be disproportionally weighted. I think this is a huge area of weakness in the adoption of best practice in recruitment, but it only takes looking at a graduate who has nothing but Cambridge or Harvard, for instance, on their CV to know that there are people out there that will make a decision based on that one fact alone, regardless of whether or not the candidate meets any other specification. Or worse, factors like race, sex, sexuality, etc. sabotaging the entire process. This is clearly not something itself that is anywhere near sorting out.
It is interesting your institutional affiliation, Anna, as I have been dealing with some of the staff at the Polish Academy of Sciences regarding the development of their MBA and DBA programmes. They have not been particularly receptive on either the academic or applied side. I would be very much be interested in publishing in this area and looking at a better relationship with the Jagiellonian University in terms of the development of a more innovative programme. It may well be that the place to incubate a relationship between the humanities and business, given the track record of your institution in education, innovation and the wider disciplines, would be there, and not PAS. I think a DBA that means something to the world is due development soon, if we are to really move the field forwards. Be very open to discussion on this.
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Many times students pass the exam in revaluation
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No.
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YES/NO will suffice. I am interested in the interplay of science and arts and humanities. In Ireland, for example, the model of Liberal Arts encompassing a student led choice in a range of subjects including philosophy and science appears to be dead. I would understand that a journal that would publish with equal status science and arts and humanities papers would be evidence of a willingness in the academic community of such an interplay. 
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@Thomas: The Journal for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa --- follow the URL below.
Kind regards! [16-11-2015]
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Music is one of the best arts that human can create. Who is the best musician of world from past time to present time. What is your reason? Only one selection.
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I'm writing an essay about personalisation and am looking to see if there has been any writing about context-aware recommender systems for groups?
For example, a bar that autoplays music based on the music tastes of people that are in the bar but also taking into account the context (i.e. Friday night vs Sunday afternoon)?
Thanks!
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You are welcome
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Thinking ahead of my academic leave for 2017-2018, I plan some travel to Spain and Italy, and would be interested to hear of international conferences in the social sciences, psychology, geography, education studies, and/or the humanities (where presentations in English would be okay). 
The time period of interest would be April 2017 to August 2018. 
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Dear Dragos, if you are interested in a conference I provide you this link to follow their update:
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What are the symmetrical phenomena in your scientific or artistic field which are comparable with symmetry of two successive musical phrases (like two atoms which make up a molecule)?
The nature is full of symmetrical balances. I am working on identical futures of symmetry in arts and sciences. I would be grateful if you exemplify symmetries in features and components related to materials or issues in your field.
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Symmetry is a fundamental principle in aesthetics, and is present in some of humankind's creations from very early times.
Here are two interesting articles about the early evidence:
Hodgson, Derek
2008 “An ‘aesthetic’ explanation for the symmetry of Acheulian handaxes: some neuropsychological insights,” in Plasticités Sciences Arts (http://www.plasticites-sciences-arts.org/PLASTIR/Hodgson%20P12.pdf, uploaded: 22 September 2008, accessed: 2 April 2015).
2011 “The first appearance of symmetry in the human lineage: where perception meets art,” in Symmetry (MDPI AG), vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 37-53 (http://www.mdpi.com/2073-8994/3/1/37, uploaded: 1 March 2011, accessed: 30 January 2015).
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Psycholinguistics, being a field of study that delves into the intricacies of the human brain operations, has shown a huge interest in studying the simultaneous rendering of the message of all its aspects. since this can be possible, can psycholinguistics improve the interpreter's performance in the black box too?
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Dear Hamza Ben,
Viewing psycholinguistic and cognitive intersections dominating simultaneous interpretation, as you have rightly observed, involves an admixture of neuro-cognitive mechanisms such as memory, lexicon, and bilingualism. As such, the bulk of related  research has fixated its focus on the role of working memory, levels of experience and expertise, language competence, as well as the strategies utilized during the translation process. For more information, I refer you to the following links, which hopefully satisfy the intent of your question.
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The only one I could find so far is: "Archive" by Arkadi Zaides.
Examples of possible non-fictional video footage: news, historical, documentary, crowd sourced, surveillance tape (not showing actors).
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The film of Merce Cunningham's performance of John Cage's 4'33''. No fiction there. Just an old dancer sitting in a chair.
In rock art studies do people understand the expression "profile depiction" to mean 1) an outline 2) a side-view 3) a non-perspectival depiction?
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Do people have any examples (or views) which might clarify the use of this and related expressions in rock art discourse? Is a "profile bison" in palaeoart an outline bison or one seen from the side? Of course a representation may in point of fact be both these as it is with the bison, but what is generally intended in the use of the word "profile"? 
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I feel strongly that a profile depiction is one that shows a side view. It can be an outline or not, but it does not show the person or animal from a frontal or rear view. If the person or animal is shown in such a manner that it has both a side view and frontal view, then it is no longer just a profile depiction but rather a dual perspective depiction.
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I'm looking at where arts journalists are finding new or innovative ways to engage in criticism. Put more generally, who is challenging the criticism crisis?
I came across Ben Davis, who is an art critic living and working in New York City, and his keynote on post-descriptive criticism. He experimented with critiques that used images only, for example. 
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That may very well be true and I only got the chance to take the single course with him, but his anecdotes on dealing with artists, journalists, and other art critics were interesting (and frequently equal parts horrifying, informative and hilarious). Apologies for not being aware, however, of the specific degree to which Hickey was considered prominent in LA. I am aware of the Sisyphean battle he and his wife fought on a daily basis to try and breathe life into the visual arts community while here in Las Vegas, however, and figured he may, in some capacity, be a resource to take advantage of. Bear in mind as well that I write poetry and my primary focus was contemporary American poets and ecopoetics in terms of what literary fields I'm most well-versed in. I was curious to see how other people responded to the thread or if she found something interesting and was just trying to be helpful in my own admittedly extremely limited capacity.
Also, the question Brittany is asking isn't meaningless as long as she has a sincere curiosity about the subject. This may also just be an attempt to put some feelers out there in order to find new avenues of approach in terms of research, refine the research question(s) that will lead to something more concrete or that has "uses". Perhaps asking the OP what their intent is or if this is going to branch into something more detailed/focused/concrete or if they're exploring this subject simply for the joy of researching something they're curious about might be slightly more constructive than the way your response was phrased. I don't think it was meant to be condescending, but I could see it being read that way, which only ends up detracting from encouraging student curiosity instead of reinforcing it, and I've seen dozens of students crushed by unintentionally hurtful but curt, potentially dismissive responses. Again, though, this isn't a field I'm overly familiar with, and if I'm reading the response incorrectly then please accept my sincere apology. I'm certainly curious to read something answering the OP's question regardless of how useful it is.
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I am doing a research on aesthetics of the financial crisis and searching for various artistic strategies dealing with this topic. Got some ideas? Thanks in advance!
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Calculation of the exact position of the lunar node will require calculation of "r" for the same longitude. It could be done with some trial and error but I am wondering whether there is a straight forward method.
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Had not expected spams here. Ganesh, I am sure, you can find better ways of marketing than misusing a question-answer platform.
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Australia is generally regarded as being one of the worst countries for investing in Arts and Culture. I would like to present data showing this using the most recent figures. Australia's investment is lower than Canada and New Zealand for example based on 2010 figures.
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also Council of Europe data for all European state members investments in arts and culture 
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Traditional intellectuals –thinkers, writers, political and social commentators, and artists- have historically played a major role in the diffusion of the ideas that shape the ways people see the world and their own society and lives
In the prominent book The Third Culture (1995), John Brockman claimed that these kinds of intellectuals have “become increasingly marginalized”. They are being replaced by scientists who, “through their work and expository writing”, communicate directly with the general public. These “third-culture intellectuals” would be represented by the likes of Paul Davies, Martin Rees, Richard Dawkins, Steve Jones, Daniel C. Dennett, Brian Goodwin, W. Daniel Hillis, Nicholas Humphrey and many others.  
The culture of traditional intellectuals, says Brockman, “dismisses science”, is “often nonempirical”, uses “its own jargon”, and “is chiefly characterized by comment on comments, the swelling spiral of commentary eventually reaching the point where the real world gets lost”.
The idea of a Third Culture has its origin in C.P. Snow’s influential “Two Cultures”   essay (1959), in which the British scientist and novelist deplored the “mutual incomprehension” –“sometimes hostility”-- between science and the arts. Scientists shared a “culture” –no matter their political, religious, social class and even disciplinary differences-, with common attitudes, standards, approaches, assumptions and patterns of behavior, At the opposite pole, attitudes were more diverse, but the total incomprehension gave an “unscientific flavor” –often almost “antiscientific”— to the whole “traditional culture”. Moreover, scientists largely overlooked traditional literature, which they perceived as irrelevant to their interests, while most intellectuals were unable to describe something as basic as the Second Law of Thermodynamics.
Snow saw such disconnection and polarization as a “sheer lose” to society and stressed the need to build bridges between the sides. In a second essay, published in 1963, he suggested that the gap would be closed by a “Third Culture” that would eventually emerge. In his version of this new culture, intellectuals would communicate with scientists.    
Not long ago, a column in Scientific American stated that Snow’s vision “has gone unrealized” (see Krauss, Lawrence M.: “An Update on C.P. Snow’s ‘Two Cultures’”, August 17, 2009).
What is your opinion? Is there such a cultural divide? Are intellectuals scientifically illiterate? Do scientists ignore the basics of the humanities? Which of them have more influence on the public? What kind of Third Culture –if any- is emerging?
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Do scientists and intellectuals bear responsibilities peculiar to them? If an ‘intellectual’ is whoever has a committed interest in the truth or validity of ideas for their own sake and a ‘scientist’ anyone possessing a special competence in the natural or social sciences, they may indeed be more likely to find themselves in certain characteristic positions of responsibility. In the case of intellectuals, the importance of providing checkable justification of claims made in their pursuit of truth brings certain responsibilities. Scientists may be said to have responsibilities for pursuing truth in their own areas of competence, for wielding their social power appropriately, for making their results generally accessible and for using resources properly. But these apparently special responsibilities are nevertheless to be understood as rooted ultimately in those which any human being may, in the relevant circumstances, be thought to bear to their fellows.
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- Is a  culture is product of human being  who have needs (biological, psychological, sociological), and creating means to satisfy those needs ( l) as Malinowski put it.
- Is culture and Civilization are linked  together ?
- How is it that one culture go beyong the boundary of its origin and embrace the world and other just vanish or stay in its limited area?
Is it possible to have a human culture which embrace all human needs?
Any reflection dear researcher  about this inquiry  will be welcomed
Kind regards Louadj yacine
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What is a Human culture ?
Culture is a way of life for different races / ethnicity encompasses many facets like religions, languages, dressing attires, hair styles, types of cuisine / food eaten, certain games / sports / martial arts practiced, certain musical instruments played, certain songs / musics / dances, value systems etc. which have their own unique identity.
Is culture and Civilization are linked together ?
Yes it is possible they can link together - however as civilization progresses, some cultural values might stay put whereas some might change in order to adapt into the advancement / changes in the Political, Economical, Social, Technological (PEST) etc. changes.
How is it that one culture go beyond the boundary of its origin and embrace the world and other just vanish or stay in its limited area?
Some culture might go beyond its original boundary due to many reasons like PEST factors above e.g. a country highly dependent on export, bilateral trades, military occupation / colonization, globalization (the world is the market) etc.
Is it possible to have a human culture which embrace all human needs?
Think is difficult because "one size doesn't fit all" as culture is supposed to be unique for each country / group of people. 
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What metrics would be best to measure quality for peer-reviewed journals in the Humanities and Social Sciences? Do h-index and IF play pivotal role in evaluating quality of a Humanities or SS journal the same way they are considered as useful tools to evaluate prestige associated with Science, Engineering and Medical journals? 
Plus, I was wondering whether or not ResearchGate would be the largest academic social network for researchers in the Humanities and SS. Thanking you in advance!
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Greetings,
At the center of Web of Science (also used to be known as ISI) there are three flagship Citation Indexes, namely, the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), Social Sciences Citation Index  (SSCI) and the Arts & Humanities Citation Index ® (AHCI). These Citation Indexes cover the world’s top- tier international and regional journals whose evaluation and selection is governed by the Web of Science Core Collection Journal Selection Process, a well-established set of criteria that have been applied consistently for over fifty years. Citation impact is one of the defining characteristics of journals covered in SCIE and SSCI. Measurable citation impact, as expressed in the Journal Impact Factor, is published annually for journals covered in SCIE and SSCI.
in addition, you can count on ERA database: Excellence in Research for Australia 
especially journals ranked as A*, A; & B
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Especially those of Adrian Willaert
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Roland Barthes' "The death of the Author" seems to establish that authorial power is communitary and that authorship belongs to audiences who can deconstruct the narrative possibilities of a work of art beyond the context of the narratives instantiated by the Author or painter or Sculptor, or Director of a work of art. 
I am not sure if Barthes is basically saying that something can be dissected and deconstructed ad infinitum in ways that organize new meanings and that freedom or play belongs to the Audience, or if he's mimicing Thus Spake Zarathustra with the notion that the rigid formalism of Art was a dead art, such that with respect to the grand narratives of a tradition, "God ((The voice of unification and individuation at the precipice of a prioritization of the alleged creator of a message or set of messages, is exhaustively the author such that the voice of that author bears no weight and ....)) is dead"
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Of course it is not solitary. Instead of solitary I should say individual. Given this how we interpret a work will be influenced by how it is framed and what is accepted wisdom on the work. I do not mean to say that cultural milieus don’t exist, but rather that the significance of the work is found in the relationship of the reader/viewer and the work. At the end of the day how a book or experience movie is uniquely individual.  
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Is there a connection between suffering and creativity if so what is it?
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In antithesis, I would assert that the idea of suffering genius is a romantic construct from the 18th and 19th centuries. It is part of a construct which deifies the creative person. The truth is that we all are creative geniuses, just some have a better support systems than others.
And suffering is the common lot of us all, not just some lofty creative geniuses.
Karl
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Or English painting in the fifteenth century, for that matter.
I have found surprisingly little out there. Lorne Campbell's Renaissance Portraits carefully avoids discussing England's input before the Tudors and Fredrick Hepburn leaves out more than he puts in in his Portraits of the Later Plantagenets.
I'm left with cross referencing and suppositions... It's maddening!
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I came across that post rather early on. I found it intersting but somewhat frustrating as the author does not cite his sources, and in fact tends to offer the counter image of Henry that has been circulating for longer than you'd think. There are some interesting nineteenth century cartoons that lampoon the jingoism around Henry. Kipling was quite cool in his reception of Henry V.
While it gave me some interesting view on who Henry was, it didn't really advance my research though, as my study is in art history, rather than history.
But in some ways, the portrait is as frustrating as the man himself. There is maddeningly little out there to know about fifteenth century art or even this copy (which dates from the Tudor king Henry VII) . The profile hides as much as it shows. Quite literally. in the end, the face remains unscrutable.
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The confrontation between the sciences and the humanities seemed sometimes like the war between two brother countries. But a lot of achievements have been reached in Research. On the other Hand often there is less Money now and more work to do in universities and in companies. So the pressure is bigger for everyone. What do you feel and think how will it be going on? How do you in your personal Situation solve the puzzle?
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There is another debate here on RG regarding the very definition and differences between what one calls humanities and social sciences which are arcane academic divisions: social sciences is enough for covering all scientific research efforts dealing with "humankind" and "societies". Having said this, since your question is intelligent and allows for practical examples, let me tell you that we have a research project since 2012 dedicated to the economic diversification of Macau: 32Km2 with an incredible GDP of around 45 billion US dollars but coming 70% from gaming industries. So, we have a research team with a historian (myself), economist, architect, urban planner, sociologist and a poet that has been translating Portuguese poetry in Chinese and Chinese poetry in Portuguese (Macau has 2 official languages Chinese and Portuguese). The role of this colleague that is himself a well-known Cantonese poet is as crucial as all the others since he stresses cultural, literary and artistic perspectives that are very important for a project in which we want to build up a theoretical model in which Macau GDP shifts towards a structure of 30% incomes from gaming, 30% from heritage tourism, and 30% from new sme linked to heritage and traditional industries.
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If at several grounds (arts and) humanities and social sciences reconcile one another so how they are different?
Kindly clarify the basic difference(s) between them.
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There is not really an epistemic difference but two diverse traditions. A French tradition (let's use this simplistic label...) differentiates human sciences and social sciences although normally using the expression "human and social sciences" as it appears in the major works by Fernand Braudel and Claude Levi-Strauss. An "English-speaking" academic tradition both in UK and the US does differentiates humanities (arts, history, art history, etc.) from social sciences (anthropology, sociology, etc.). All these scientific fields address throughout different perspectives "humankind" and "society" and the terminological split doesn't make any other sense than to justify arcane academic installed divisions. I am a historian and historiography clearly is today the set o social sciences studying the past. My research questions normally traveled from the present to the past and not reversely as well as my colleagues that are economists, sociologists, anthropologists, etc. are permanently searching in the past answers to present questions. I think that the notion of social sciences is "clear" enough and it is what I normally use regardless time and space contexts or academic traditions, precedences and labels. 
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This question is the title of a video on Youtube that intrigued me, especially because of these accompanying remarks:
«It sounds like a hugely arrogant and self-serving suggestion to imply that cleverness might lead you to loneliness. But if you define cleverness in a selective (and modest) way, there may truly be an aspect whereby it can lead to a certain isolation. [...]
«It sounds like a very mean and undemocratic thought, trading off the peculiar glamour that isolation has in a Romantic culture – in order to gain an oblique sense of superiority and perhaps pass off an absence of social skills as a virtue. It is important, therefore, to be clear what is meant here by intelligence. It has nothing to do with degrees or any of the criteria by which we ordinarily measure cleverness. What is meant is emotional intelligence, which exists (or not) in every strata and nook of society…»
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Dear Dr. Karl Pfeifer ,
Intelligent people are more closed in themselves and they are self-absorbed in solving some problems.
Their brain is a tool of work.
They devote much more time to cultivation, and this is a kind of self-isolation.
But the feeling of being alone is completely different.
One can be married and have many children and he still feel lonely.
At the same time, a scientist or a person of art, never gets bored.
There is one golden rule: "The smart man is never bored!"