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Hi All
I want to apply for the Web of science and Scopus indexing of my journals. To make a healthy Editorial Board I want names of renowned and qualifies scholars preferably PHDs in the following fields.
Literature, social sciences, arts, humanities, Behavioural sciences, various subjects of sciences and engineering those who agree may send their cv s or simple Co sent on the following e mail address.
Those saying yes your link to research gate profile may also be posted on the website if you are unwilling to send cv
Best regards
Publisher ERJs
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Any role of plastic surgeon
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When I look at the comments for interesting-looking articles, I hope to see remarks that address aspects of the contents of the articles, that aid understanding, or make useful suggestions. Instead I typically find scores of mere "congratulations" and no further information. This is completely useless and irritating, and what few informative comments there might be are buried and hidden in the mass of useless comments.
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Dear Prof. Karl Pfeifer ,
I agree with your point, though I understand people reluctance to make any unprofessional statements, judgements, or allegations as an instinctive healthy prudence. If people like the study but afraid to say anything to the substance of the study, they can Recommend or Follow the article without any related comments.
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Recueil de planches, sur les sciences, les arts libéraux, et les arts méchaniques : avec leur explication (1762) was edited by Denis Diderot. Was it Jacques-François Blondel to write the following commentary about François Franque? Where is the evidence?
Cette Planche offre une distribution réguliere très-in-génieuse, contenue dans un terrain clos de murs, le plus irrégulier qu'il soit possible, & dont M. Franque a tiré parti d'une maniere à faire juger de sa sagacité, de son goût & de son intelligence. En effet, rien de si bien entendu que ce plan; beauté, proportion, variété, agrément, commodité, symétrie, relation des dedans aux dehors, tout s'y trouve réuni. En un mot, ce projet nous paroît un chef-d'œuvre, & seroit seul capable de faire beaucoup d'honneur à cet architecte, s'il n'avoir pouvé par tant d'autres productions l'étendue de ses connoissances, & son expérience dans l'art de bâtir.”
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My own occasional attempts to identify the contributors of articles and paratexts on other subjects have been only mildly successful. For architecture, I would start with Kevin Patrick Harrington, Architectural Relationships: Changing Ideas on Architecture in the Encyclopédie, Diss. Cornell Univ., 1981.
I presume that you have already compared Blondel's discussion of the same subject in volume IV of his Cours d'architecture (1773), chapter V, pp. 360ss.
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Hi everyone,
Some time ago I shared my scientific essay with GRIN. They offered me selling hard copy of this work via GRIN site or Amazon and pdf version to download from GRIN. I prepared pdf version of the paper and upload it, but I must admit there was inconsistency between final version active on site and pdf version that I have shared with them - problems with accurate formatting. Even if I selected for free option, little price was set up for downloading the pdf. Each one who wants to upload its own paper, has to agree with conditions, and one of them is that the paper will be active at least for 5 years under agreed conditions.
Still I have doubts if I did wrong or good sharing my essay with them. As a publisher was GRIN suitable choice indeed? What do you think? What experience do you have with this publisher?
Thanks in advance for your reply!
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I think 'GRIN Publishing' is one of the vanity publishers. Do not publish your thesis or book via this publisher, it may bring trouble in your scientific career.
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Any good journal in graphics, visual culture, fine arts, visual communication or related humanities? Preferably Scopus and web of science indexed.
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I was once asked to volunteer to teach a philosophy course for U3A. I had to turn down the request because of the excessive time involved in travelling to and from the venue, otherwise I would have been happy to do it. However, I later learned that even volunteer instructors were required to become fee-paying members of their U3A chapter. Since I had no interest in availing myself of their services I thought that policy was a bit much.
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I should emphasize that I don't have a problem with U3A's use of unpaid instructors. I have great respect for pro bono volunteerism. Nor do I have a problem with people who make use of U3A's course offerings and other benefits having to pay a reasonable membership fee; the various U3A chapters do after all have overhead costs to cover. But I was taken askance by the idea that volunteer instructors or tutors should be required to pay U3A membership fees even when they make no use of U3A's services. Also, it likely works as a disincentive for potential volunteers.
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If we consider the total loss of our ethical and moral principles, this means that "human misery" "knocks on our door" ... "Misery" comes from the failure to fulfill our main duties towards others, and it is precisely there where it has its origin the entrance through the door of all "vices" .
Oh human misery, how many things you submit to for money! [Leonardo Da Vinci]
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Agree with Juana Mare
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Where can one find the most up-to-date and comprehensive list of journals in the humanities (esp. philosophy and literary studies) that should be avoided because of their unwarranted publication fees, shoddy or fraudulent refereeing practices, and absence of digital preservation policies?
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The updated list of predatory journals and publishers is in below link;
Shrestha, J. (2020). List of predatory journals and publishers (preprint). Retrieved from http://eprints.rclis.org/40643/
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Can the second-language version, strictly speaking, be considered a translation of the first-language version or is it merely a somewhat looser interpretation? How do such authors approach the task? How are the two versions produced (e.g. conjointly or serially?) and how closely are they related?
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There is an emerging subfield of translation studies called “self-translation studies,” and there are a lot of studies already done on this topic. Eva Gentes has compiled a bibliography on self-translation.  You'll find a number of projects on self-translation on RG as well.
I myself have published articles on the topic. In my view, self-translation is “rewriting,” ”reworking,” “re-creation,” and “translation of the self.” Please see: e.g.,
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In this post-millennial world of cosmopolitanism, globalisation, and world literature, one wonders if the present moment isn't the perfect opportunity to take stock of where our interests and priorities lie, what kind of life lessons does a global pandemic have for all of us as a collective entity, and above all how do we respond to something that simply exceeds the limits of any one particular area, region or nation-state? It is also a timely reminder of how we take certain things for granted and in the punishing rush of events, forget to spend quality time with those who matter to us the most, be it family, friends or acquaintances.
Through social distancing, we are paradoxically coming together in an attempt to contain the damage. This is far removed from the world of digital technology and social networking sites where the idea of togetherness also simultaneously exists with a profound sense of boredom, isolation and estrangement. The global economy has come to a veritable standstill and yet for the first time in so many years people are actually realising the merits of altruism and putting the interests of the 'other' before the 'self'. Instant gratification, limited attention span and 'the devil may care' attitude is being decisively supplanted by an increasing concern for the environment, the underprivileged and the future generations.
But above all this crisis is about the dissolution of human pride and an equally important focus on learning humility. It is a reality check to prevent us from taking ourselves too seriously for far too long. The profit-maximising impulse and the fiercely competitive spirit that is now being instilled right from the increasingly commercialised spaces of classrooms to the demanding environs of corporate offices has been rendered frozen by something which is much more pressing, immediate and therefore worthy of attention.
In such a scenario, a moment of pause and reflection never hurts. It gives us a breathing space from the target-oriented lives that we find ourselves in, especially in a country like India where population significantly alters the stakes of job prospects and economic opportunities. And while it is true that the destitute and the daily wage labourers, the rickshaw walas and the domestic helpers bear the worst brunt of this protracted lockdown, it also opens up a rare window of opportunity for those who are in a position of power and privilege to contribute in their own ways toward combating the spectre of hunger and starvation.
Life, as we know it, will never be the same. The haunting memories of these difficult times will always endure while the notion of normalcy and restitution will probably be the most challenging proposition for policy makers. The spirit of resilience and ingenuity that human beings have repeatedly shown right throughout history is for the first time proving to be inadequate. And there lies the rub. An overriding emphasis on empathy which is formed in the crucible of a global crisis could quite easily become a distant memory the moment that threat is successfully diffused.
Self-aggrandisement would once again be at an all-time high. But do we want to spin around in circles and just wait for the next major calamity to once again teach us about wisdom and virtue? Or haven’t we had enough of an eye-opener to realise that it is only by locating oneself in the larger scheme of things and network of relationships that a more desirable and progressive future is possible. To understand this in its proper context, one only needs to imagine a hypothetical situation in which if any pharmaceutical company would have been successful in finding a cure for COVID-19, it would have again been driven by the predictable considerations of personal profit masking itself as public welfare.
So where do we go from here? And how do we reconcile our punishing schedules [an ostensibly stultifying one for many in times of a lockdown] with a profound appreciation for everything precious, beautiful and worthwhile in our lives? What are the bitter truths that we could take in our strides without caring too much about a loss of pride or self-respect? Because after all it is about recognising the priceless merit of the here and now as opposed to the idealistic and the utopian. It is about taking cognisance of both the kids as well as the elderly, the indigent neighbour as well as tenacious doctors and their committed support staff. And last but not the least, it is about practising kindness, compassion, and humility with others that could help us confront our personal demons and eventually exorcise them.
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Dear Shailendra.. we can contribute a lot ..please see our example of what humanities can contribute
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I am a first-year PhD student who would like to hear about other researchers' experience related to interdisciplinarity within the humanities, especially those combining both text and visual elements:
  • Which are some suitable methods that can be applied?
  • Should both areas of studies be represented in a balanced way?
  • Any tip that you would have loved to hear before developing your own interdisciplinary project
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This largely depends on the more specific areas that you are researching of course. There are correlations between literary theory and art/aesthetic theory, and both can and are often utilized for art and literature, so you can draw correlations between the two. In addition, I tend to use theory that already exists in the interdisciplinary realm, like Derrida’s hauntology, or Kristeva’s abjection(two of my favorite). The balance between the two fields Is really up to you and how you approach your research as long as one isn’t an afterthought, in which case you need to question whether it belongs in the project. I hope that helps!
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Calculation of the exact position of the lunar node will require calculation of "r" for the same longitude. It could be done with some trial and error but I am wondering whether there is a straight forward method.
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Let us share and continue to learn-life-long learners as the best way to improve this mother earth.
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In a research project funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, we are currently trying to establish indicators and quality criteria for measuring the social impact of the social sciences and humanities. We are interested in the question of what social impacts SSH has and, of course, where the limits of measurability lie. Do you know of any relevant literature that deals with the social impact of SSH? I would be grateful for hints.
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I know some of the people who wrote this and would trust that they read everything.
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This question is the title of a video on Youtube that intrigued me, especially because of these accompanying remarks:
«It sounds like a hugely arrogant and self-serving suggestion to imply that cleverness might lead you to loneliness. But if you define cleverness in a selective (and modest) way, there may truly be an aspect whereby it can lead to a certain isolation. [...]
«It sounds like a very mean and undemocratic thought, trading off the peculiar glamour that isolation has in a Romantic culture – in order to gain an oblique sense of superiority and perhaps pass off an absence of social skills as a virtue. It is important, therefore, to be clear what is meant here by intelligence. It has nothing to do with degrees or any of the criteria by which we ordinarily measure cleverness. What is meant is emotional intelligence, which exists (or not) in every strata and nook of society…»
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Intelligent people are not acceptable to society so they feel frustrated and become lonely
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Many scientists lived who have milestone the world with his studies from past to present. Which scientist has been a role model for you through his studies or his/her behavior? Which have their properties, behaviors, inventions or principles, etc., leading to you or your studies? For example, "Karl Popper's Basic Scientific Principle Falsifiability" rules to me. Karl Popper is defining the inherent testability of any scientific hypothesis by this principle.
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Prof Jordan Peterson, who is also an active member of Researchgate.
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Is it really necessary to teach unscientific knowledges of humanities to STEM students ? In Europe such as UK, Germany, France etc STEM students just learn their related STEM courses so that they can graduate in 3 years whereas in US 4 years. Since1 more year of tuition and living and starting 1 year late in job is a considerable loss of time and finance to students and their parents. These issues must be considered in favour of students who accumulate so much loan debts rather than US universities and relate academics.
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Sinan Ibaguner There are good reasons as to why universities in general should offer compulsory humanities courses. However, those reasons are based on the fact that humanities are sciences, and not unscientific knowledge. I would have thought that at this point the importance of ethics, for example, in the educational process offered in higher education was not an issue anymore, but let me try to explain: it's no good for employers (including STEM research centers), a highly skilled STEM graduate with no communication skills nor assertiveness, that can allow him to work effectively on teams of multidisciplinary professionals.
It's also no good for our global community to have STEM graduates who are highly skilled in their technical field of knowledge, if they have no idea how to base their moral judgments about their work, or anything they do.
That's why every higher education student should have well designed, serious compulsory humanities courses, not just STEM students.
Also, higher education is not a race, it's a personal process. No one is arriving 1 year later than anyone.
About school debt in US graduates, it is due to the incredibly high tuition fees their universities charge, not because they have to stay I year more than their European counterparts, I believe.
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The common view is that it does, but recently this view has been challenged. For example Prum (2013):
"Current concepts of art cannot exclusively circumscribe the human arts from many forms of non-human biotic art. Without assuming an arbitrarily anthropocentric perspective, any concept of art will
need to engage with biodiversity, and either recognize many instances of biotic advertisements as art, or exclude some instances of human art."
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Have you related the Discussion on art, with that of design. Art is connected to inspiration and design to motivation.
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Are citation chances for researches in pure sciences more likely than researches in humanities to hit a high score?!
Of course you'll get cited when you write a good research, but based on observation I noticed that researches in sciences like physics, biology, mathematics,...etc get more citations even though some researchers come from a not very robust academic background!
Thank you for sharing your opinion!
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In an ideal world that would be nice Muthana - but tradition dictates. It may be that humanities citation is harder to come by but it could be argued that it's more difficult to get published, in the first place, in the pure sciences. Of course, this is an over-generalisation - but could be a counter.
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Works of art are an important element of culture in the social and cultural heritage. The achievements of culture, including works of art, should be cherished for future generations, they can not be allowed to be forgotten, and unfortunately it often happens that in the era of current informational technological revolution, the development of new media, in the pursuit of modernity specific aspects of culture, tradition and art they are often interpreted only in the historical dimension.
On the other hand, new information technologies, new online media should be used to promote traditional values ​​of culture and art. For example, websites have been created for many art and culture. Many works of art, entire collections of many museums are digitized in the form of a digital record of reproduction of works of art so as to increase the accessibility of citizens to cultural and cultural heritage.
Does this type of propagation of culture and art on the Internet should be developed?
I think so.
Do you agree with me?
Please, answer, comments.
I invite you to the discussion.
Best wishes
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Relanzamos este post, con los datos actualizados extraídos del Master List de Web of Science en fecha del 6/12/2015, pensando especialmente en los profesores que tienen que acreditar la calidad de sus revistas en el proceso de sexenios que comienza mañana.
Thomson Reuters lanza un nuevo órdago a la mesa. Si hace un año aumentaba la cobertura de Web of Science con las revistas de Scielo e incluía la base de datos Scielo Citation Index, ahora, crea un nuevo producto, Emerging Source Citation Index, que vió la luz en Noviembre. Emerging Source Citation Index (ESCI) consiste en una base de datos dónde están todas las revistas que en la práctica están siendo evaluadas para entrar a formar parte de las bases de datos de Web of Science Core Collections (Science Citation Index,Social Science Citation Index y Arts & Humanities Citation Index). Por tanto no estamos realmente ante un nuevo producto, sino ante la explotación pública de la base de datos que utilizaban los analistas de Web of Science para realizar el seguimiento de aquellas revistas que optaban a entrar en los productos de evaluación de revistas más exigentes (Core Collections). Esto añade transparencia al proceso y hace públicas las métricas de estas revistas. Thomson se postula como el producto de evaluación de revistas con un mayor número de cabeceras.
Emerging Source Citation Index empieza con  2400 revistas de 82 países, lo que amplía mucho la cobertura, en un claro ejemplo del interés de Thomson Reuters por mejorar la presencia de áreas sub-representadas en el producto. No obstante, los cinco países con mayor presencia en ESCI son anglosajones (Inglaterra, USA, Canadá, Países Bajos e Italia). La presencia Iberoamericana en el producto es secundaria, y sin embargo, porcentualmente es el producto de Thomson Reuters, si obviamente descartamos Scielo Citation Index, donde nuestras revistas tienen una mayor presencia. En presencia se sitúa España la sexta con 165 revistas y Brasil la octava con 81.
Que opinan de esto ante Conacyt para el SNI??????
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Emerging Sources Citation Index is part of WoS core collection, but without impact factor. Journal Lists for Searchable Databases
  • Web of Science Core Collection
  1. Arts & Humanities Citation Index
  2. Science Citation Index Expanded
  3. Social Sciences Citation Index
  4. Emerging Sources Citation Index
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This question include all sort of arts : fine arts, visual arts, dance, theater, performances, architecture, cinema, videos, etc.
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Boundaries are basically a definition (the literal sense of the word). Definition gives shape and coherence, and with that meaning. If we all come with our own personal ideas of what 'art', or any other concept for that matter, should be, the result is chaos...
To find what the boundaries of art are (and to see how elastic they can become), it may help to ask the opposite question: what is NOT art?
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Researchers are engaged in conducting research in diverse areas such as Science, Technology, Medicines, Arts, Humanities and many more. Many researchers are doing interdisciplinary research.
While conducting research, there are likely to be similarities and differences in research approach and methodology.
In your opinion, what are the similarities and differences in approach and methodology for research in Science, Technology, Medicines, Arts, Humanities and other areas ?
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In any dynamic system from molecules, to stars or people or money or any other system, the same law seems to apply: Movement is proportional to a driving force or a motivation and inversely proportional to a resistance.
Movement = Driving force / Resistance
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See the following link for a description of graph databases https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graph_database
It seems that such data bases and the benefits they provide for analysis have primarily been used in business, basic science and in examination of social interactions, e.g. social networks. It would be helpful to know about other uses such in the humanities.
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Hello again Dibakar,
It is helpful to learn of the Switzerland Digital Humanities Project to store related information (earlier UK efforts and the European Digital Humanities Association) as well as its use of RDF graphing. Below is a link to an article describing differences between RDF and Property Graph Databases such as with Neo4j:
In searching the “Digital Scholarship in the Humanities” publication, there seem to be at least a couple articles that employee graph databases with the second making mention of Neo4j:
The link to the article about the HuNI (Humanities Networked Infrastructure) in Australia is “even sweeter” as it describes how this site provides graph database capabilities to be utilized with its holdings as well as some captivating examples and links to additional information (e.g. in the in the HuNI site ‘About’ section ‘Technologies’ lists those included such as Neo4j). Very cool!
So good to get this information about graph database use.
Thank you once again, Fred
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I started videoblog about culture and science recently on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oqrctt4zh3A&t=10s). Would you like to share with me your experience on vlogs and how to improve transmission of knowledge through YT?
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It is a great initiative!Using words, pictures and interactive videos is one of the efficient means of utilizing technology in the sharing of knowledge. Congratulations my brother. Many of us would mimic your footsteps.
My little caution is to verify facts you want to present in the videos as we do in research (Validity)and practice what you intend to post via knowledge sharing to rid it of all possible mistakes. All the best.
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I'm writing an essay about personalisation and am looking to see if there has been any writing about context-aware recommender systems for groups?
For example, a bar that autoplays music based on the music tastes of people that are in the bar but also taking into account the context (i.e. Friday night vs Sunday afternoon)?
Thanks!
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You are welcome
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What are the symmetrical phenomena in your scientific or artistic field which are comparable with symmetry of two successive musical phrases (like two atoms which make up a molecule)?
The nature is full of symmetrical balances. I am working on identical futures of symmetry in arts and sciences. I would be grateful if you exemplify symmetries in features and components related to materials or issues in your field.
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Symmetry is a fundamental principle in aesthetics, and is present in some of humankind's creations from very early times.
Here are two interesting articles about the early evidence:
Hodgson, Derek
2008 “An ‘aesthetic’ explanation for the symmetry of Acheulian handaxes: some neuropsychological insights,” in Plasticités Sciences Arts (http://www.plasticites-sciences-arts.org/PLASTIR/Hodgson%20P12.pdf, uploaded: 22 September 2008, accessed: 2 April 2015).
2011 “The first appearance of symmetry in the human lineage: where perception meets art,” in Symmetry (MDPI AG), vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 37-53 (http://www.mdpi.com/2073-8994/3/1/37, uploaded: 1 March 2011, accessed: 30 January 2015).
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Psycholinguistics, being a field of study that delves into the intricacies of the human brain operations, has shown a huge interest in studying the simultaneous rendering of the message of all its aspects. since this can be possible, can psycholinguistics improve the interpreter's performance in the black box too?
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Dear Hamza Ben,
Viewing psycholinguistic and cognitive intersections dominating simultaneous interpretation, as you have rightly observed, involves an admixture of neuro-cognitive mechanisms such as memory, lexicon, and bilingualism. As such, the bulk of related  research has fixated its focus on the role of working memory, levels of experience and expertise, language competence, as well as the strategies utilized during the translation process. For more information, I refer you to the following links, which hopefully satisfy the intent of your question.
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The only one I could find so far is: "Archive" by Arkadi Zaides.
Examples of possible non-fictional video footage: news, historical, documentary, crowd sourced, surveillance tape (not showing actors).
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The film of Merce Cunningham's performance of John Cage's 4'33''. No fiction there. Just an old dancer sitting in a chair.
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I'm looking at where arts journalists are finding new or innovative ways to engage in criticism. Put more generally, who is challenging the criticism crisis?
I came across Ben Davis, who is an art critic living and working in New York City, and his keynote on post-descriptive criticism. He experimented with critiques that used images only, for example. 
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That may very well be true and I only got the chance to take the single course with him, but his anecdotes on dealing with artists, journalists, and other art critics were interesting (and frequently equal parts horrifying, informative and hilarious). Apologies for not being aware, however, of the specific degree to which Hickey was considered prominent in LA. I am aware of the Sisyphean battle he and his wife fought on a daily basis to try and breathe life into the visual arts community while here in Las Vegas, however, and figured he may, in some capacity, be a resource to take advantage of. Bear in mind as well that I write poetry and my primary focus was contemporary American poets and ecopoetics in terms of what literary fields I'm most well-versed in. I was curious to see how other people responded to the thread or if she found something interesting and was just trying to be helpful in my own admittedly extremely limited capacity.
Also, the question Brittany is asking isn't meaningless as long as she has a sincere curiosity about the subject. This may also just be an attempt to put some feelers out there in order to find new avenues of approach in terms of research, refine the research question(s) that will lead to something more concrete or that has "uses". Perhaps asking the OP what their intent is or if this is going to branch into something more detailed/focused/concrete or if they're exploring this subject simply for the joy of researching something they're curious about might be slightly more constructive than the way your response was phrased. I don't think it was meant to be condescending, but I could see it being read that way, which only ends up detracting from encouraging student curiosity instead of reinforcing it, and I've seen dozens of students crushed by unintentionally hurtful but curt, potentially dismissive responses. Again, though, this isn't a field I'm overly familiar with, and if I'm reading the response incorrectly then please accept my sincere apology. I'm certainly curious to read something answering the OP's question regardless of how useful it is.
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Australia is generally regarded as being one of the worst countries for investing in Arts and Culture. I would like to present data showing this using the most recent figures. Australia's investment is lower than Canada and New Zealand for example based on 2010 figures.
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also Council of Europe data for all European state members investments in arts and culture 
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Especially those of Adrian Willaert
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if you can read Dutch: Adriaan Willaert, ca. 1490-1562 : leven en werk : stijl en genres
Ignace Bossuyt Published in 1985 in Leuven by Universitaire Pers Leuven 
otherwise try contacting Bossuyt by mail. Another good source but old is Fétis.
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Roland Barthes' "The death of the Author" seems to establish that authorial power is communitary and that authorship belongs to audiences who can deconstruct the narrative possibilities of a work of art beyond the context of the narratives instantiated by the Author or painter or Sculptor, or Director of a work of art. 
I am not sure if Barthes is basically saying that something can be dissected and deconstructed ad infinitum in ways that organize new meanings and that freedom or play belongs to the Audience, or if he's mimicing Thus Spake Zarathustra with the notion that the rigid formalism of Art was a dead art, such that with respect to the grand narratives of a tradition, "God ((The voice of unification and individuation at the precipice of a prioritization of the alleged creator of a message or set of messages, is exhaustively the author such that the voice of that author bears no weight and ....)) is dead"
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Of course it is not solitary. Instead of solitary I should say individual. Given this how we interpret a work will be influenced by how it is framed and what is accepted wisdom on the work. I do not mean to say that cultural milieus don’t exist, but rather that the significance of the work is found in the relationship of the reader/viewer and the work. At the end of the day how a book or experience movie is uniquely individual.  
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Or English painting in the fifteenth century, for that matter.
I have found surprisingly little out there. Lorne Campbell's Renaissance Portraits carefully avoids discussing England's input before the Tudors and Fredrick Hepburn leaves out more than he puts in in his Portraits of the Later Plantagenets.
I'm left with cross referencing and suppositions... It's maddening!
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Will do. I'm actually rewriting the entire dissertation (well, at least the first half; most of thesecond half is ok).
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I am trying to analyse how bodies presented in contemporary religious movies are becoming increasingly 'sexy' so I am just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on some theoretical work or past research work on such a topic.
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i think this goes along way in defining so deeply, the concept of religion and culture.since some religious traditions permit holy sex, then the society should simply be given a critical look so one can really trace the history of such holy and erotic adventure
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Within the ideas of deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism are there robust cultural alternatives to commercial forestry, parks, and conservation plans? Are these ideas - primarily - embodied and tested in the policy and planning of forest landscapes anywhere in the world?
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Yet Claus... in these days of global movement towards ecosystem services... the social and cultural aspects of ecosystems are getting significant attention. Just to complicate things 'biodiversity' has been deemed a quantifiable condition that can not be linked in any meaningful way to service value so it is being linked back to the social through extant policies. There are some useful reference here. http://uknea.unep-wcmc.org/Resources/tabid/82/Default.aspx
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For automatically building a corpus of literary text with metadata.
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This should help you get the texts and metadata (but no annotations though).
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In the Humanities, what is it about secondary sources that can make them so undesirable? Perhaps it is partly due to "straw-man" characterizations, and partly because they tend to be written in such a way where the author does the thinking and the reader does the memorizing.
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Ah, in that case, you are correct. There is no substitute for a primary source. I misunderstood your use of the term "secondary source." I meant a scholarly critique and you meant something different: a trot, a kind of paraphrasing, watering down, or résumé of the primary source. You mean reading a classic comic-book instead of the classic itself.
The reason that a classic is superior is that it expresses multiple nuances that a trot cannot. As a result, the watered-down version lacks the depth and breadth of the original. I do not know of any simplified version that could even pretend to equal the primary source, unless the source itself is so lackluster than any newer version of it is an improvement. In that case, it would hardly be worthwhile to make a newer version. Better to consign the primary source to a trash-bin. What say you?
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Are there pressures within our educational systems that work against the development of academics and thinkers who delve broadly across disciplines in their research and writings? Does specialisation ensure that we all all reading and thinking narrowly within our disciplinary areas or does the open access of information across the internet mean that we are all becoming more interdisciplinary? I would be interested to hear your thoughts.
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I would agree with the quote from Sara Louise, and more so. People are now so narrow they do not even understand the scope of their own subspeciality and as a result not only re-invent wheels, but mostly square ones! But I also think you have answered your own question Paul with the two options - and it is both. I am interested in the overlap of visual art perception and neuroscience. I have degrees in Fine Art, Medical Science and Immnopathology but only because I was one of the last generation in the UK to be allowed to wander through subjects as an undergraduate - forty years ago. The interesting problem for the current century is the direct relation between physical dynamics and phenomenal experience. At the moment the division of disciplines is almost totally crippling the project. On the other hand there are internet based groups who are learning from each other in 'Renaissance-style' debate. The academic machine is a moribund white elephant but a new phoenix of free creative thought may just rise from the ashes. But maybe it was ever thus - the demographics of learning have changed but maybe not the critical dynamics.
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Do current academic institutions leave room for anymore to be truly eclectic in their academic practice? Very many of us enjoy and find great reward from reading outside of our specialised academic fields. We also often find utility in inter-disciplinary collaborations. However, do pressures exist within our educational systems, for example, the pressures for tenure in the US that discourage us to truly immerse ourselves and work broadly and across disciplines? Does specialisation mean that we tend to read and think narrowly within our disciplinary areas? Conversely, does the easier access afforded by the internet and communication technologies facilitate greater access to information and collaboration outside of our disciplines?
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If one is pragmatic and focused exclusively on his/her carrier and in on being more rapidly promoted, specialization in a given field definitely works better. However, for me this is a rather boring and not satisfying approach. During the last over 20 years, I have changed several times my research interests and, respectively, the countries/institutions, where I could have explored them. This has given me obviously more work, but also broader knowledge and more satisfaction. Well, this was on the price of not rising to the boss (director) chairs, because the highly specialized and not (or much less) "distracted" people have had already occupied these positions in the given places. In any case, I do nor regret my choice and it would be the same, if I were to restart everything from the beginning :-).