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Art Education - Science topic

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  • In my opinion, the location of knowledge in the head or in the brain is a postulate, that is to postulate means "to suggest or accept that to theory or idea is true as a starting point for reasoning or discussion" (Collins). But Basis for Research. To postulate is "to assume to be very or exist; Take for Granted ”(Collins). And I would add to take for granted without any proof, and in any case not demonstrable .
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La plupart des théories de l'apprentissage et de l'enseignement sont basées sur le postulat que la connaissance est dans la tête ou le cerveau. Et si ce n'était pas le cas?
À mon avis, l'emplacement des connaissances dans la tête ou dans le cerveau est un postulat. Un postulat est un « Principe non démontré que l'on accepte et que l'on formule à la base d'une recherche ou d'une théorie » (CNRTL).
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There are no accepted theories of learning apart from Pavlov's conditioning. In terms of teaching, there is a multitude of these. The question of where the mind (knowledge) resides cannot be answered by any empirical means. It is a question of where you are and what you are. Contemplate these essential questions for as long as you can!
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Dear researchers, I am writing a thesis on self-regulated learning and Al-Ghazali's views in education. Are there any similarities? What new views on education/Tarbiyah can be applied? please help books or references that support.
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Individual learning or self-learning is a type of complete learning that emphasizes giving the learner absolute freedom in his learning and following the approach of imposition or severity and not taking knowledge together because it is harmful to them
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I am doing research in using visual aid in learning mathematics and I need a new and recent research in this area. specially the new empirical studies in this field.
many thanks 
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You can see this papers:
Tashtoush, M., Alshunaq, M., & Albarakat, A. (2020). The Effectiveness of Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) in Creative Thinking for CALCULUS Students, PalArch's Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/ Egyptology
Tashtoush, M., Wardat, Y., Aloufi, F., Taani, O. (2022). The Effectiveness of Teaching Method Based on the Components of Concept-Rich Teaching in Achievement for Students of Linear Algebra Course and Their Attitudes Towards, Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice
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The integral development of children is intimately with the game. In a bibliographic review of this area of scientific knowledge (children's game): Which authors should not be omitted?
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"What classical authors should not be omitted from in-depth studies on children's play?" -- Reinaldo Requeiro asks.
Briefly, I would point to classical authors: the Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget and the Soviet psychologist Lev Vygotsky.
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Which scholars, pedagogues, and projects are carrying forward the legacy of arts educator Elliot Eisner (1933-2014)?
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Sep 14, 2020 - Which scholars, pedagogues, and projects are carrying forward the legacy of arts educator Elliot Eisner (1933-2014)?. Which scholars
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It happens that some buildings often designed in an innovative way, according to innovative concepts, which were later found to be crucial for the development of a specific era in the history of artistic development, are considered as a kind of architectural works of art. Architectural objects of this type are designed by globally known architects, they become the main objects of architecture, a kind of showpiece of a specific city, region of the country and quickly become tourist destination destinations and are covered with special protection as recognized as a significant contribution to the history of architecture and national heritage development of the country.
Do you agree with my interpretation of architectural works of art?
Please reply
Best wishes
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Dear
Ghada M.Ismael Kamoona
, Karim Medlej, Ihsan Jasim, Bartek Felski, Suad Mohammed Heil, Hisham Abusaada, Dmitry Sukhin, David Pecháček, Thank you very much for participating in this discussion and providing inspiring and informative answers to the above question: When do certain architectural objects become an element of art?
This discussion confirms the importance of the above-mentioned issues and the legitimacy of developing research on this subject.
Thank you very much and best regards, Have a nice day,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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Edgar Wind( Berlin 1900-London 1971) was a Philosopher and Art Historian part of the Aby Warburg circle, he wrote Pagan Mysteries of the Renaissance ( Norton Books, New York 1958). He was educated at the University of Vienna ( Schloesser, Dvorak) and University of Hamburg, (Cassirer and Panowsky). I recently published the first full biography on him, ' Edgar Wind Filosofo delle Immagini, la biografia intellettuale di un discepolo di Aby Warburg ' pp.374, Mimesis Edizioni, Milano 2019. I am currently still researching and publishing on Edgar Wind trough a a PhD at the University of Kent, UK
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I cannot speak to Dvorok’s influence on Edgar Wind, a topic that I am glad to leave to Wind’s biographers. When I completed my PhD in 1979 at Harvard, on the rare occasions in which we discussed iconography of paintings (the Fogg prided itself on connoisseurship) Panofsky was considered the leading iconographer in America and Gombrich led the revered Warburgian school, to which Wind was the rebel angel, on account of his astonishingly rude, even cruel, review of Gombrich's book on Warburg.
None of this mattered to us at Harvard, where we fixated on the getting the attributions right (somebody has to). But when I entered real life and had to write books about Fra Angelico, Botticelli (2017) and Michelangelo, it became obligatory to understand the meanings of their art. Although there are still art historians who regard Neoplatonism as something exotic, most historians of Italian Renaissance art would probably agree that Wind’s Pagan Mysteries of the Renaissance is one of the best books ever written on the classical philosophical themes found in the paintings made in the humanist courts, especially Florence.
Wind's interpretation of Botticelli’s Primavera has not been wholly superseded by the readings of Gombrich and others. Indeed, although he sometimes gets lost in the depths of reading, by now enough voices have been heard to show that Wind's research is never wholly wrong on anything.
In homage, I’ll try to attach 2 photos of my well-thumbed copy, replete with post-it notes… I’ve chosen a sample page in which he speaks as familiarly of Ficino, Plotinus, Pico and Lorenzo il Magnifico, as if they were people he knew on his block and saw everyday.
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What distinguishes fine art from narrative art? Is this distinction (Bourdieu) important to maintain? For whom? Why? All of these issues in Art History are heating up due to recent shows of van Gogh's painting that cite letters to his mother and sister (primarily) in which he explains why he painted Bedroom in the Yellow House at Arles as one prominent example. van Gogh states the painting was inspired by his reading of George Eliot's Felix Holt the Radical and was vG's attempt to recreate these spartan surroundings of the novel's protagonist Felix Holt, yet to do so in bright colors.
Why have traveling shows often omitted van Gogh's Le Borinage paintings, esp. shows coming to the US? And another mystery, why is the work of Vincent van Gogh with the miners sometimes referred to as an unhappy early period that van Gogh more happily grew out of when he learned to paint better. What subjectivity holds these views and why are they the foregrounded view, at least in English-language studies of van Gogh at this time.
Will rhetorical analysis added to the standard formal approaches to painting aid in gaining a more parallax view of this painter and of art history in general?
Your comments are most welcome.
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D.E. Morant Sometimes artists' intentions are significant, sometimes not. But as you suggest, de-narrativized abstraction has it own narratives; however, they are not the Rorschach-type narratives you suggest but rather the theoretical narratives described by Tom Wolf in The Painted Word.
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Dear Scientists,
I had recently come across the new science (to me) known as collapsology. Promoted by a group of scientists and people who beleive on the soon coming of the end of the world- just as beleived by the religious believers- which they call the fall down of industrialization. They are already forming networks and strategies to cope and be prepared for the event. Are they confirming what the religious have been preaching long ago?
Please, your views on this is highly solicited, can you share.
Thank you!
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I did not say that there will be no end, however, the end will retroact as a motive for the present. The future, in order to be able to call itself a future, must be able to feed back into the motor for the present; therefore, in a completely theoretical way, what does not have a future cannot even be foreseen.
What will not be predictable is not predictable. Nothing physical we mean chemical or biological, pure principle of causality and knowledge. Only what is possible in the future is foreseeable. Confirm what the religious preached long ago? Evidently continuing to preach the end has not done so badly to the "development" of humanity. "Development" let us not be "progress". Fighting or dancing against the end of the world is the greatest and most wonderful refrain of humanity. Difo Voukang Harouna Thanks for the reply.
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Is anybody working in Evidence Based Teaching in Art Education (extended to Industrial Design or Graphic Design)?
Any suggestion/results you could tell?
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Thanks for your answer. I will read your thesis in order to find some ideas.@Hussam_Al_Quran
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Yes, the 21st century can be called the age of photography, graphics, image, etc. because this form of transmission begins to dominate the Internet. In addition, photography can be cultivated and developed professionally or as a hobby, as art, i.e. artistically.
In my opinion, photography can be an art if it is practiced with passion etc. Sometimes a photo that qualifies for the artistic picture of the year is created by chance, like a unique impression captured in light photography.
Impression captured in a complete photograph, accidentally and unchangeable.
Another time, such an exceptional artistic picture arises after many weeks or months of preparation, after many rehearsals, in a unique place, which is not easy to reach and is a big undertaking.
It seems to me that it is similar to many other fields of art.
In view of the above, the current question is: Do you think photography can be art?
Please, answer, comments. I invite you to the discussion.
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Yes, sure. The photo speaks deeper than a lot of words.
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There are many essays and blogs supporting the idea that art education and involvement of children would generate a wide variaty of benefits for them. And , intuitively, this outcome is obvious. Nevertheless, I have not found academic studies documenting this phenomenon. Do you know any?
Thank you!
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Hi Alexandra
You could contact my colleague Graham Welch at
All the best
Philippe
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Works of art are an important element of culture in the social and cultural heritage. The achievements of culture, including works of art, should be cherished for future generations, they can not be allowed to be forgotten, and unfortunately it often happens that in the era of current informational technological revolution, the development of new media, in the pursuit of modernity specific aspects of culture, tradition and art they are often interpreted only in the historical dimension.
On the other hand, new information technologies, new online media should be used to promote traditional values ​​of culture and art. For example, websites have been created for many art and culture. Many works of art, entire collections of many museums are digitized in the form of a digital record of reproduction of works of art so as to increase the accessibility of citizens to cultural and cultural heritage.
Does this type of propagation of culture and art on the Internet should be developed?
I think so.
Do you agree with me?
Please, answer, comments.
I invite you to the discussion.
Best wishes
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Teach only what the student is able to learn. Or better, teach only the most of what your can actively share with your student.
Some eventual arguments:
1. Knowledge is not transmittable.
2. The meaning of knowledge can’t be the same within deep experience or within poor experience.
3. The locus of knowledge to be learned is in between, let’s say, the master of dance and the student, both in action. The beginner dancer dances better because of the help of the master.
In this example, the new knowledge seems to be "in between" (master vs learner). It is not completely the deep knowledge of the Master since he reduces his possibilities to adapt them to the beginner, and it is neither the actual possibilities of the beginner since he dances better only because he is helped by the master. So there is some knowledge enacted "in between" by both of them. What is then the nature of this knowledge that is short of what the teacher knows and beyond what the beginner already knows?
4. Etc.
Comment: The term expert is used here in a very wide sense: it just means that the teacher knows better and more than the student. For example, one doesn't need to be an expert mathematician to teach math at the primary level. At the university level, at least, you would need to be an expert to teach math.
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“Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.”
– William Butler Yeats.
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Very often we see that the educated people do crimes in their everyday lives. Societies are different. Crimes are also different in terms of intensity. The questions arise: Does the formal education system help our students become good citizens? Is not it expected that educated people will act with better morality than others? Is this true that the moral sense in human is connected to formal education?
Please share your views, opinions, comments and questions.
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Before incorporating moral elements in academic courses, there has to be a qualitative change (in the academic arena) at the top to ensure that there are leaders (and not just managers) at the highest administrative positions. These leaders must be selected on the basis of merits only, competent, and honest.
Once there are leaders of high caliber, the lower rank & file reputable academics "who would have been appointed in a fair manner" will feel more comfortable & secure in including some ideas in their courses that will deal with moral issues.
A university must have a strict ethical code which fights corruption, racism, dishonesty, and cheating, etc. Regulations must apply on all those who are found at the academic setting "with no exceptions" from the bottom of the ladder to the top of it.
Immorality has destroyed empires in the past so it can easily cause a downfall of an academic institution despite the supporting safety measures that may be undertaken.
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Has pedagogy and education created new scenarios?
How is learning changing and for who?
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Thanks Osama
The formats mentioned in the linkage very interesting. They are used also on Coursera and other platforms linking people from far to close encounters on a shared theme.
I was wondering if there are any more and different ones.
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Anyone could help me with bibliography on multiple inteligence assesment in foreign language education? I am wirting my dissertation and I don´t seem to be able to find much information about it. Thanks a lot.
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Great topic! We were discussing this exact issue in our department yesterday. I'll keep following you to see how your dissertation research progresses!
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Objects, people, abstract forms are often used in paintings to portray ideas. What types of objects, forms, or figurative representations change the psychology of the human ideals of truth? These are things that may shape thoughts and everyday decisions.
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That question is really a reflection on the multi-disciplinary work of René Magritte.
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Sometimes adults try to impose their ideas of art making. Canvas and brush seem to be "the top" of art (maybe because it can be exhibit), but: is it a solution for early learners (1-2 years old) ? Their motor skills and references are very limited, so why not another kind of artworks?
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To me the real question is: why teach arts to 1-2 years old? Never too early to start?...
The first years need is to be cared for, to attaint a secure socioemotional development and all the skills that make possible to relate to the envirnment (physical and social)
Obviosly if we create experiences that relate to esthetics and arts no doubt the child will be learning, ... just like anything else
Too often early education is based on the epistemologic fields, at least it is so in my country, and the curricula of the different sciences is simplified and adapted to shorter and shorter ages. But in doing so we forget the child, in my opinion it is necessary to adopt a developemental perspective, especially at these ages. In doing so will be encouraging their senses, autonomy, and their expression
... not so used to use English anymore
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Bringing education to the doorstep of every one
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I think both have significant importance in their own way.....
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Today, every educational field or domain contains several branches. You first choose one branch of your field to prepare your Master and Ph.D degrees. What is preferable system for you:
1- study the same branch at both Master and Ph.D degrees
or
2-study different branch at Ph.D degrees from Master degree
And, Why?
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I believe that the continuation of research begun in the Masters preferred.
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Dear Researchers,
I took Art Eductaion class years ago and the professor cited studies in childhood development that found that children's art participation dramatically lessens after puberty.
Can you point me to the studies?
Thanks,
Gloria
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I also believe creativity when not sustained diminishes. The interest children have to draw and create go down as the drawing activity becomes more complex.
There are a lot of studies by most child psychologist to give some of these reasons of low interest in children toward creativity. Some of these doctors can be interest of parents, attitude of the society toward people who get employment through creative skills , even school teachers and friends.
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Kindly share your opinion/prediction about
the progress of scientific research,
mode of research,
elements of future research,
accomplishment of a research (development of scientific law).
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Future scientific researches will be far more dependent on technology. In the field of Biological Research, use of living animals for testing of some drugs or as some models may be stopped very soon, within 10 years. Animal/animal body part models will be replaced by software based models.
In other branch of Science, I think same thing may happen. I can not say the possible changes as it require very deep knowledge about the research procedures running presently.
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How does drawing what we see relate to writing what we experience? Are we as self-conscious? (See below.) In a question I posed here called "Why can't we draw what we see" I asked why Piaget and other developmental psychologists noted a falling off of attempts to draw at the age of puberty. Also self reporting of how it felt to draw register more dissatisfaction with one's one efforts at this age and on. In college writing classes I would start with this "ice breaker" to get students acquainted: DRAW A FISH. Just a cartoon fish or whatever. Would they draw a big fish or a tiny one and would they include context (background.) No grades. They would look at partner's fish and see what it told about the partner. Several students usually protested that they couldn't draw and showed evident drawing anxiety. They alluded to experiences outside class of not being able to draw. In writing what we experience are similar self-doubts inhibiting writing? Are the two activities connected cognitively in close ways? I wish I could have tracked whether the same people who said they couldn't draw also showed writing anxiety.
References:
Journal of Projective Techniques and Personality Assessment 25.3
Handler, Leonard and Joseph Reyher. “Figure Drawing Anxiety Indexes: A Review of the Literature.” Journal of Projective Techniques and Personality Assessment 25.3 (1963): 305-313.
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I appreciate the varied ideas you have on this topic. Often people have a kernel of a story and just bog down because they don't know how to write what they have experienced. The are different emotional reasons for this, of course; but I think the cognitive requirments in many cases are less than having the desire to write and valuing that activity enough to make a couple drafts.
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I started videoblog about culture and science recently on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oqrctt4zh3A&t=10s). Would you like to share with me your experience on vlogs and how to improve transmission of knowledge through YT?
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It is a great initiative!Using words, pictures and interactive videos is one of the efficient means of utilizing technology in the sharing of knowledge. Congratulations my brother. Many of us would mimic your footsteps.
My little caution is to verify facts you want to present in the videos as we do in research (Validity)and practice what you intend to post via knowledge sharing to rid it of all possible mistakes. All the best.
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learning design is not for the sake of finishing the semester but to master each of the design aspect introduced by the lecturer. The transition from secondary education to tertiary education sometimes can be a culture shock for students, the placement of lecturers to teach in the first semester must be done based from specific criteria that will lead to successful delivery. Any other idea?
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By offering greetings to them
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A small circular rubber stamp appears on the back of four of the panels surveyed. Although smudged, the stamp appears to read ZOLI / I-5. See illustrations. It resembles a customs stamp although this is unlikely to be the source. Do you know the origin of this stamp?
Please note that although the main article deals with a number of forgeries, these particular stamps are genuine.
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Thanks Ian. The other three are even less legible but it is a good suggestion and I will add them in due course.
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I want to find research both qualitative and quantitative based on the subject of Art education enabling students for social transformation or social responsibility.
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So you're not looking for material/ articles on art therapy for people with various mental health issues then?
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As in my opinion, yes measuring system is important but only in the beginning of the drawing lesson not the entire drawing process
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if you want a recognizable result in the representation of a human figure (like robot foto by the police) measuring is important for the overhaul figure but all lies in the detail: it are the little differences that makes a recognizable portret or in exaggeration a caricature. This is a question of lines and curves, light and shadow, and tension between them - they are partly measurable but  too complex as a whole to be reduced to measure.
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I am looking for some review literature that relate Graphic Design with the advent of Digital Revolution. It is for research project, and I am having some difficulties in finding specific bibliography. Thank you in advance!
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Olá, Ana!!! Espero que esteja bem. Talvez este artigo te ajude. A pesquisadora Priscila Lena tem perfil aqui.
From the streets to the screen: street signs as a source of inspiration for digital typefaces, 
Boa pesquisa.
Meus melhores cumprimentos!
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I remember doing similar things during my PhD. Maybe this could be useful for you.
Best,
Phil
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could you give us more details 
regards
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For several years I am observing diverse views toward how should one culture preserve and keep its traditional or folk music alive. I met a number of modern conservatories having courses on teaching this kind of music. Even though, such music conventionally were being taught orally for thousands of years. Do you think teaching traditional and folk music through modern system will eventually harm the nature of this kind of heritage or it is they only way to keep it alive in our time.
I personally have written a short article in case of Iranian traditional music a while ago in which I wrote some of my suggestions. However, I recently had a chance to visit Beijing central conservatory and listened to the outcome of teaching traditional music there and that visit made me think more about this issue.
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In a nutshell, the observer (viz., the conservatory) becoming the participant (viz., the musician) and, in turn, unintentionally changing the original character of the music.
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What do you think about the emplementations of Mythologies to sustain and enhance learning through roots and ancient vocabularies and variables?
Is it possible to employ mythology for learning?
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Certainly- after all, our ancestors probably told these legends and stories for that very purpose. Just be sure to give your students a good elaboration of what it is that  you are trying to teach them. I find that we can't assume our younger generation has any inkling of what--for me--was common knowledge of and appreciation for the classic myths.
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Dear all,pls what about typography art , who artistic now following this art and the application of typgraphy ?
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Hi Abdelrahman,
I am,
Regards,
Fedde
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I am looking at actors' experience of presenting lost, obscure, or forgotten plays. I am following some suggestions of Clark Moustakas in his Heuristic Research and have done considerable reflection on my own experiences. The qualitative research I intend to undertake with theatre artists needs to be accompanied by a survey of relevant readings. Phenomenology, performance philosophy, and creative writing are all on my horizon. Does anyone have any suggestions for by bibliography? Interviews will be my main resource but the lived experience of my subjects needs to be connected to relevant contexts.
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¿Que tipo de drama familiar?
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Why is someone's real story considered art and what's the best way to do it (creative adaptation or hard facts)?
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Another "old" but interesting source of conceptual ideas about this is Peter Brooks's Reading for the Plot, which reminds us that narrative forms are usually about the ending, which is where the meaning comes.  Even a biography is to some extent fiction.  On the stage, when you have a couple of hours to make a meaningful relationship with an audience and a consensus (or organized debate) about meaning, the story you choose to tell needs some kind of coherence for the brain and emotional resonance for the heart.
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Deep learning and Generative Models : Trends?
Anything in this area will be usful : survy, recent article, etc
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Generative adversarial networks (GAN)
This is the current hottest concept in DL after convolutional neural networks (CNN) and deep belief networks (DBL).
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Just to let everyone know that if they were thinking of attending this conference, the abstract deadline is 20th March
More details about the meeting here
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Dear Colin A Hendrie
I would like people to do their "homework" and be ready to discuss it.  I do not talk much (and my voice irritates some people more than fingernails on a chalk board and some even find my voice hard-to-understand). So, one could never expect me to operate like any sort of sales person for the Ethogram Theory. See: https://www.researchgate.net/project/Human-Ethology-and-Development
I will come to ISHE if I can see the agendas and if I find them adequately intelligible and interesting (and not all tremendously specialized).  The more information along these lines you could provide me, the better.
Regards, Brad Jesness
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Hello. Good day!
I wanted to ask you what is the minimum basis for the course and what things will be taught. I was a student of physical engineering at the University of Santiago de Chile, USACH. I am currently doing my masters degree at the University of Chile in cyber-physical systems on wind energy. If you have useful information about what they will discuss the topics you tell me and I will let you know.
Thanks.
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Dear Espinosa, it depends on the educational/instructional objectives of a course through which the policy makers/educators/state aims to observe in a person's behaviors, abilities etc. As such, these objectives act as the prerequisites for a course content that serves as a comprehensive knowledge and or skill basis for those who want to become, for example, an engineer, medical doctor etc. However, within a larger picture of any formal education program, the content of, for example, an engineering program is not without its objectives, content (or knowledge domains; courses that serve as a proxy for the domain knowledge etc.), teaching-learning processes, and assessment and evaluation. I strongly suggest that you should read relevant books to learn more things regarding these issıes (e.g., curriculum development books). 
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Bibliography needed for a research project relating the Performing Arts and museums
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Lucia Cataldo, "Dal Museum Theatre al Dgital Storytelling. Nuove forme di comunicazione museale tra teatro, multimedialità e narrazione", Franco Angeli, Milano 2011
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I am interested in whether and how artistic genres and styles will impact on children's perception and understanding of the story. When drawing illustrations for a story, how does the artist decide which style to choose? Are they aware of the affordances and constraints of each style?
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I worked as an illustrator on about 25 children's and adult books, mainly in literacy education.
How does the artist decide which style to use?
Illustrators usually each develop their own particular style over years of study and practice. This style will be informed by their interests but also by their chosen medium, which will have it's own physical traits and limits. Some media allow for fine control and a more prolonged period of making, while others demand broader marks and more abbreviated time period. For example watercolours are generally mush quicker than oils, but both offer fine detail control, whereas linoprinting or resist drawing use tools which are by comparison broader in mark, with other strengths.
That said, unless you are an author/illustrator, the style for any particular book is generally decided upon by the editorial team, who will discuss the emphases in the text and select an illustrator whose work accentuates those communicative spects to visualise it.
Are they aware of the affordances and constraints of each style?
The way any particular illustration communicates to its audience is generally the same. The use of composition, relative size, colour and contrast ( tone, pattern and texture) control where in the image the eye moves. These are transferrable skills used in all the visual arts, and whilst simple sounding, offer enormous sophistication in delivery of structured hierarchical information.
Of course these formal elements are subject to the limits of the medium they are presented in. When working on any visual imagery there are four main factors which inform the final image; ground, medium, tool and hand.
The surface ground will have it's own particular physical properties, texture, tensile reaction, permilability, etc.
The medium will similarly display qualities affecting delivery, clotting, viscosity, dispersal gain in some media, etc.
The shape of the tool transferring the medium to the ground will obviously have a shape, may contact the ground in particular ways, may be affected by size and flexibility by nature or design.
The last factor, the hand, manifests the intent and emotion of the illustrator, this is broken into two aspects; movement direction and speed.
The final aspect that effects illustration is the complex neurological and physical process by which the viewer perceives it. What the illustrator intends is not always appernet to the audience, and similarly, the audience may never notice things the illustrator has intentionally included. I know I hid many 'Easter eggs' in the work I did over the years, usually for fun but once or twice because I was sure the editor and publisher weren't actually interested in the work. Not one was ever noticed, probably because I'd made sure viewer's were focussed on something else in the image.
Hope this helps.
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Art is often displayed as a status symbol
Galeries and critique care - and are exclusive - about art 
For example by preventing artworks to fall in the hands of auctions.
How exclusive is art? 
And in what way art is linked with status?
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As a young student said some days ago: 
“you don’t know if it is funny unless you are not the only one laughing”
(Things can be funny to me but to no one else - and everybody can find something funny that I cannot.-  what goes here for jokes also goes for works of art as well)
There are two things here : 
1 - the personal esthetic experience and 
2 - the appreciation by a certain public, art critic, art market, …
1 and 2 can come together but not necessarily!
“Give random viewers a rating scale and show them pictures of art that is considered low value and high value.  See if the survey participants match the values held in the art market.” https://www.researchgate.net/post/What_is_the_relation_between_art_and_status_anxiety#584d9d0493553b3151169804 
If this should be a test - then what should be the RIGHT outcome?
- Does the rating match the art market significantly or not?
- Is the art market right - or are the random viewers?
First this problem:
Artists have learned a public how to look at art their way.
(artists showed their "possibility of art", they emancipated certain esthetics, indicated an object by signing, did esthetic discoveries, drew the attention on things that otherwise could never have had their place in a museum.)
So we look in the direction artists have pointed out for us 
- they learned us to perceive and to appreciate in a certain way.(As a matter of fact, great artists are above all adepts because no copy or variation can match the original, so artists are pushed forward by others in their trying to be successful in the same direction - it’s so simple as that!)
Neutrality is problematic in art: 
An evaluation will always necessarily be going in a certain direction: 
That one pointed out by a certain art-world.
(for example: if they like Picasso - they will choose “something picasso-like")
An art definition is always problematic because of neutrality
- not one fits a dictionary.
So disconnecting appreciation from context is an impossible mission.
 
Seconds:
We did put the market price as criteria (status linked esthetics)
So I have a problem with the Venn diagram of three circles: artist, customer/patron, and venue.
These are not separate worlds. They are linked in an unseparable way: 
(More like the angels of a triangle than the partial of Venn diagram)
We all look through a certain frame, a canvas; a context.
There is no out of context possibility. Artist, customer/patron, and venue are part of a context
The case of the displaced spectacles on floor of San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art shows it all:
When you put something on display as if a work of art- some public will take it.
In het case of the spectacles they even do an unconscious attempt to an art proposal - witch has been instantly rejected by the institution. 
These visitors became artists just for one moment without knowing this themselves!
And I think a lot af serious critics could be fooled as wel - (I don’t exclude myself from that!).
There is Parsons’ typology of museum visitors that goes form recognition (Example : “He! This looks like my dog!”)  to autonomous appreciation: (Example: “This looks like a Picasso but he has not that interiority, and the gestural is too pronounced, looks like the painting of an architect”) 
 so: public - artwork - market prise - seem linked as loose sand.
Price can be suggestive: first show the price and then the artwork and there will be parameter indicating connection. (=context)
Is time the best judge in art?
Time is change - it took a long time before the West discovered the beauty of African art.
(And then again: Art had nothing to do with Central African masks, they were made for quite other purposes.)
I think that the crisises specific to artistic work don’t match the fluctuations of an art market.
Nowadays artists become famous already at a young age.
So the product they make can be changing a lot over time. 
There are differences in style but also differences in appreciation (trends). 
Buying their work becomes risk investment  - as it should be, following the natural evolution of an artists career. 
When you invest in things you truly love you will be disappointed. You can get frustrated when your beloved art work looses its market value - but you keep on believing.  
But when it comes to status symbols it becomes quite a different story: Here the investment is not necessary linked with love but it is with status anxiety.
A collection cannot be ridiculed by critics - because in that case they are offending the collector’s status.
So  - Is the art market getting into the hands of guided economy for the part where status is involved?
Are critics still free to speak their mind when all of this is concerned? 
And how can artstudents - future artists - learn how to cope with these mechanisms?
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An "atomic curriculum" for art school means: 
The teacher follows the student's project and not the other way around.
Each student discovers his or her way in art school. 
(Old school did the opposite: had a general curriculum - taught drawing from nature previous to painting class etc.)
But what about "the school style" - an atomic curriculum in the end - only can show differences if it succeeds - no general line here?
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Kenneth
Thanks for your help.
An atomic curriculum doesn't exclude high technical demands in training - it only directs them.
The personal project can give a technical exploration its sense and direction.
greetings
Willy
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Should an art school only train art practice and project content-
or does she also ought to prepare the students how to adopt an attitude towards the dynamics of the art market?
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Art market is not the only "market" that an artist can deal with. We must train our students within the creative industries' context, the art market and also the social pratice that may envolve the broad field of Arts
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Art is the purpose of an art school - Is she in need of a general art definition?
Students have specific needs:
They need to discover there own way - make their own choices, create their own style, there own idiom, their own signature.
Has the school to lead the students - or to follow them?
Has an art school to be a focus - or a rainbow?
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Art is a way of seeing that pushes beyond, beneath, behind what we perceive in everyday reality. One's conscious decision to capture and express that unique impression or perspective is the practice of art-making. Schools play a vital role in teaching means and methods-- from traditional to radically new and as-yet untried, but choices of medium, style and genre stem from the initial impulse. Thus "defining" art is a slippery slope, as it 's essence shifts depending on the vision of the mind's eye for both artist and viewer/audience. As Vygotsky said:“Creativity exists not only in great historical works, but also everywhere human imagination combines, changes, and creates anything new.”
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Is Western Art history the story seen from the male point of view?
What about women artists?
Where's their story?
What was their influence in art at the time?
Are they lost for art history?
Or has art history to be rewritten?
Are they all forgotten?
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The classic answer to this question is in Linda Nochlin's 1971 article, "Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists." Definitely read this if you genuinely are interested in the question. 
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I'm looking to conduct a qualitative study involving art instruction in a school located within a community with high populations of migrant farmworkers.
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Jeffrey,
The US DOE should have that data, or the states. Obviously Texas and California have high migrant populations, and the Southeastern US also has high migrant farming populations. You might consider contacting the USDA to see if they have data in this respect.
Best,
Amanda
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There is controversy as to whether creativity is an innate or acquired ability. If it is an acquired ability, what can teachers do to enhance the creativity of their students?
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Mark has a great point. To a certain extent, creativity is innate but it can be developed to a great extent. Nature vs Nurture. Teachers' pedagogical practices can be a platform to enhance students' creativity skills.
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I'm working on an Art syllabus for an international school and I'm looking for help regarding which directions to take. My aim is to focus on skills and creativity rather than art knowledge.
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 Dear Erez,
Thank you so much for your contribution. Everything you said is absolutely on par with my thoughts on school and learning, and it's from those thoughts that my question arises. If children are free and creative and if schools are institutions which condition that freedom and creativity, I find myself in a standstill when faced with the task of producing a document which is usually used as the guideline for how schools perpetuate their control over the leaning environment.
In other words, it is not so much that I don't know what should be done in the classroom, what I'm looking for is a way to translate it to paper and have it approved by the school and, ultimately, the government. A way to express the general goals for the subject, while maintaining the children's freedom to learn and guide the learning practice, a compromise between the schools "ecology" and the child's needs.
What I need is smoke and mirrors; to satisfy the bureaucratic machine and clear the way for my students to thrive. 
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With the new literacy, diverse game mechanics are applied in the class room to enhance performance in students. The scoreboard as a game mechanic is a social selection procedure and as such seems to be mutual exclusive with the much praised 'autonomy' art students are expected to strive for. 
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An important consideration is that the score not decrease. This is unusual in a classroom context where the grade is considered to be a weighted average, and not doing well on an assignment can cause a grade to fall. This is controversial amongst educators, but is essential in gamified classrooms. In a game one advances by accomplishing things, not usually by doing them better, and the score can't fall. Yes, the health level or power level can fall, but not the score.
Check out Katrin Becker's work - she's working on a book on gamification in the classroom and is something of an expert on the subject. I've been doing it, but she also writes about it. http://minkhollow.ca/becker/doku.php
One example is:  Katrin Becker, Scott Nicholson (2016) Gamifying the Classroom: Pros and Cons, (Ch. 3) in Learning, Education and Games Vol. 2: Bringing Games into Educational Contexts, edited by Karen Schrier, ETC Press http://press.etc.cmu.edu/content/learning-and-education-games-volume-two-bringing-games-educational-contexts
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I am seeking for other performance assessment models rather than numeric, in professional actor training in Universities or Conservatories.
 Thanks for your help. 
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I remember being a student in the one-year Drama Course at Melbourne University in 1976. The grades back then were pass / fail. Students who desired honors grades kept away. I believe that so many thoughts and emotions are triggered that assessors (staff? other students? external assessors?) should award only an arbitrary grade (pass if you turn up often, fail if you do not) because there is no way of recognising inner tumults. There was no written exam nor assessment of a journal. We were bodies learning how to express ideas / desires in spaces. I'm only confident in saying too much should be going on.     
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I'm looking at the impact of teaching art and art history/appreciation to older people (50+) and it seems to me that Mirror Neuron research has an important role in this area - I've got the ones that come up on google but there may be something more specific from this community.
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Dear Peter, I must confess I'm a bit sceptical not about the finding itself of the MN system but about its interpretation in terms of simulation theory and scope. I'm puzzled also about the connection between audio-visual mechanism in MN system and the recognition of properly musical properties of sounds. Here some reference on papers I happened to read on MN and music learning/performing/affective_cognition:
1. Molnar-Szakacs, Overy, Music and mirror neurons: from motion to ’e’motion, Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2006, 1(3): 235–241;
2. Colwell, Webster, MENC Handbook of Research on Music Learning: Vol. 1, pp. 190
3. Matyja, The next step: mirror neurons, music, and mechanistic explanation, Frontiers in Psychology, 2015, 6(409)
4. Schlaug, Norton, Overy, Winner, Effects of Music Training on the Child’s Brain
and Cognitive Development, New York Academy of Sciences1060: 219–230 (2005).
5. Lahav, Saltzman, Schlaug, Action Representation of Sound: Audiomotor Recognition
Network While Listening to Newly Acquired Actions, J. Neurosci., January 10, 2007, 27(2):308 –314.
I've also read something on simulation/imitation role in learning to play piano, with a speculation on the MN system as underlying mechanism, but I can't recover the reference.
Hope it may help.
 
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I am currently completing a master's thesis about interpretation of Angklung, traditional music in Indonesia that uses bamboo. I am looking for studies on the subject that relates bamboo usage and ecotourism.
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I have just returned from a visit to Myanmar/Burma along the Irrawaddy river.  Bamboo is grown in plantations and used extensively in their agriculture, for fencing in animals around the 'villages' (of some 250,000 people).
Long bamboo poles are a vital aid to navigating the river which is very shallow right now.  Our tourist boat was guided by this practice in places. Two men stand in front of a ship or cargo vessel, calling the depth to the guy steering the ship; the river is difficult to navigate because of the many sand bars up its length. Without such a handy and ancient practice we would not have been able to reach Bahmo north of Mandalay.
The Burmese also use bamboo for constructing musical instruments, though I did not see a great variety of these.  They are similar to Indonesian instruments.
Importantly bamboo is the base product of the lacquer boxes, and other beautiful jugs, and larger objects.  These are being made especially for the tourist trade.  We were shown the whole process from splitting the bamboo and coiling it for boxes through the application of lacquer and then designs applied - such beautiful work and sold very cheaply - under $US 10 for a jewelry box.
 Tourism has only just begun in Myanmar as the country emerges from political isolation.  
Nancy Pollock, Anthropology, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
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Working with teaching art with students from elementary school and high school, and I wonder about the existence of other research that addresses the reading of images and works of art in the classroom. What methodologies and themes are used for the production of knowledge in art education.
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Here is one of my articles that might help.
Alisha M. White & Michelle Zoss (2015) “It's a Sad, Sad Story”: TeachingEmotional Connections and Tone in Literature, The Educational Forum, 79:3, 213-229, DOI:
10.1080/00131725.2015.1037513
And, here are some sources I used in writing my dissertation lit review.
Albers, P. & Sanders, J. (2010). Literacies, the arts, and multimodality. Urbana, IL: NCTE.
Connery, M. C., John-Steiner, V. P., & Marjanovic-Shane, A. (Ed.). (2010). Vygotsky and creativity: A cultural-historical approach to play, meaning making, and the arts. New York: Peter Lang.
Piro, J. M. (2002). The picture of reading: Deriving meaning in literacy through image. The Reading Teacher, 56(2), 126-134.
Smagorinsky, P., Cameron, T., & O’Donnell-Allen, C. (2007). Achtung maybe: A case study of the role of personal connection and art in the literacy engagements of students with attentional difficulties. Reading & Writing Quarterly, 23, 333–358.
Whitin, P. (1996). Sketching stories, stretching minds: Responding visually to literature. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Walling, D. (2005). Visual knowing: Connecting art and ideas across the curriculum. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Walling, D. (2006). Teaching writing to visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Wilhelm, J. D. (2004). Reading is seeing: Learning to visualize scenes, characters, ideas, and text worlds to improve comprehension and reflective reading. New York, NY: Scholastic.
Ernst, K. (1994). Writing pictures, painting words: Writing in an artists' workshop. Language Arts, 71(1), 44-52.
Zoss, M., Smagorinsky, P., & O'Donnell-Allen, C. (2007). Mask-making as representational process: The situated composition of an identity project in a senior English class. International Journal of Education & the Arts, 8(10), 1-41.
 
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Is there any reason to use vocabulary like syntax to get at how we use art vocabulary in teaching and learning in the classroom? Is it useful to delineate 'language demands' with language function, syntax, discourse with visual arts education students?
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For good understanding of 'art', a student must know what 'art' means in its own mother or father language and know whether his or her culture have something they can link to explain the word 'art'.
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Since mental imagery is important in design and experts use this skill, so it is important to improve it in design courses and students should learn how to use mental imagery in design process. But the important think is how this skill can be improved in students (specially with different learning styles)
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In my Opinion,
It is important that students in the very beginning of their design education develop a critical eye that knows: how to see. Nurturing the skill of seeing in beginners is not only about the observation of figural appearance, it is more about acquiring the ability of questioning what is being seen, as well as imparting a manner for deducing and proposing what can be seen. Training the student’s eye for such skill requires a training of simultaneously thinking and making together. This also motivates a sense of visual curiosity that will soon become the core of the analytical process of reasoning that fuels creative work.
In addition, learning “how to see?” is also more about recognizing the potentials and possibilities, the successful visual inquiry will most likely reveal the interrelation between the different elements and aspects of the design problem, The recognition (and respect) of the relationship between their given elements of the problem provides students with some start points to begin their design and a logic to build their design decision on.please check the attached workshop
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Cynscribe Directory http://www.cynscribe.com/ is the most comprehensive online resource for calligraphy. However, many of the links in the section online videos/courses are broken and it is not easy for a beginner to know which of the individual calligraphers' sites are reliable. I guess it is a matter of subjective judgement but I would appreciate any opinion or review. I am particularly interested in guides that teach the basics. Have you read any of the books included in the bibliography by the magazine Beyond Calligraphy:
Beyond Calligraphy has also set up a shodopedia, or a shodo web encyclopedia explaining Chinese and Japanese calligraphy terminology: http://www.shodopedia.com/
Another bibliography on calligraphy which includes various styles and articles and books on the history of writing has been compiled by the Italian typographer Alessandro Segalini: http://www.as8.it/edu/calligraphy.html
I know that there are not many people on RG following the topics ''calligraphy'' or "Japanese arts" or arts education but I hope to gather views and experience on the following questions:
Can you recommend any online courses/guides incl. videos (preferably free) or print books (e.g. available through Amazon) on Japanese calligraphy? Are you a member of a calligraphy professional society or would you recommend any based on your personal experience? Are you aware of an online directory/resource similar to Cynscribe? Are there academic programs or arts libraries with good websites where similar information/resources or some reviews could be found? Are there any forums or groups on social media?
Many thanks in advance
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In my opinion, japanese calligraphy is one of the most difficult arts —including martial arts— and it is prefererable to learn directly from someone who masters it, otherwise you are only going to be able to copy forms and not to express the spirit of the word.
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I'm looking for any references/ researches/ books using colours as assessment tools or techniques in assessing/evaluating students performances/ learning outcomes in any education siting in any disciplines specially at higher art education. Any recommendations,, please.
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I think this reference will be useful for you: Vision and art: the biology of seeing .Margaret Livingstone (2002)
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Is anybody aware of anybody working within the area of environmental art? I am particularly interested in any information about the amalgamation of environmental psychology and environmental art
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I'm not sure about the psychology element, but you might look into the various art-related publications in ecocriticism. Braddock's volume "A Keener Perception" might be a starting point, and with regard to contemporary art you might look into the writings of Yates McKee.
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I am developing a research project and I am working on this theme. I wonder if there are scientific papers on this subject, to help me complete the literature review.
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A place to look might be in Scott Thomas' book understanding comics. http://scottmccloud.com/2-print/1-uc/ I do not have my copy with me right now but seem to recall that he did cite some relevant studies and had some references within the book.
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Does anyone know of an artistic assessment as good as the Peabody Individual Achievement test?
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What are you testing? If creative problem solving, then most studio teaching tests that through set exercises. The Torrance for Creative Thinking is a formal test which requires examinees to make and title a drawing, or to write extemporaneously about objects from their own life experiences - in other words, just the kind of creative tasks set in studio arts courses. It is the scoring that is debatable. There is a fifty-year longitudinal study: Runco, M. A., Millar, G., Acar, S., Cramond, B. (2010) Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking as Predictors of Personal and Public Achievement: A Fifty Year Follow-Up. Creativity Research Journal, 22 (4). DOI: 10.1080/10400419.2010.523393. It is worth looking at the debate around the studio critique as an assessment mechanism to gain perspective on the subtleties of testing creative problem-solving against technical aptitude, which is evidently not simply on a separate axis, but may be braided with 'creativity' in artistic development.
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By "know", I mean being a friend, collaborator or any other relationship where Georges Braque interacted with them for all or part of the above period.
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Duchamp knew Braque and visited him many times in atelier between 1910 and 1911 while Braque was engaged in "analyrical Cubism". Duchamp's conception of Cubism was very much influenced by Braque effort towards visual strenght and order - at that time Duchamp was much closer to Braque's idea of cubism than to Picasso's one. The writer Roché was an intimate friend of both and write about them. As for Delaunay and Arp: obviously Delaunay knew Braque in Paris during the pre-war years, the problem is if Braque was interested in Delaunay. I strongly doubt about it. Nor Braque neither Picasso had interest in "orphism" or everything but their own interpretation of cubism. As for Arp: he was a young, swiss painter before being known as a Dada artist after 1917. I don't think Braque knew anything about him before the first world war end. 
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What images are suitable for Visual coaching with young people? I am a lecturer in fine arts who also want to coach pupils by means of images (photos) which topics are discussed during pupil guidance! is there picture research by and for young people?
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I think the best way to teach art is by using your own imagination, let the students make an image based on words, concepts or ideas, your brain is the best visual tool, so they can start using it to create an image of what they want, belive, think or just to have fun.
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M Leuven (Belgium) is planning a new pseudo-permanent presentation of its collections. We are thinking of a 5-year research project in order to use our presentations as a lab to measure the interaction between public and visual works of art (old masters! What are the possibilities and pitfalls? What can be interesting (see: with practical museological results) research topics?
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This is a very good idea - and I think it extends work related to 'inside-out' and 'science in the making' in for example Deutsches Museum ( see Morgan Meyers work on this). We have used the concept of experimental zones, as a explorative space in the real setting of the museum. Here both museum practices and visitor practices related to changing conditions have been explored. you can find some papers on this work on my RG page.
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I am currently reading recent publications in neuroaesthetics and related fields in preparation for designing and implementing a theoretical course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, and am interested in hearing about how neuroscientific research has been applied in projects involving artistic creation and production.
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Hi David:
I have dipped in and out of this very interesting thread, so please forgive any oversights my comments here. First, I think questions of cultural comparisons should be raised with any investigation of the role of human biology on perception, but most especially on aesthetics. To what extent, and in what ways, can we deal with a universal biological human aesthetic response? Even if humans have identical biological responses to stimuli, those responses may be different valued and interpreted across cultures. 
Second, I think the work of psychologist J. J. Gibson should be considered in this exploration. (Gibson, J. J. 1979. The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.) Some of his useful observations include the idea that animals (and humans as animals) never perceive in a vacuum as most psychological tests of visual perception had been conducted up to that time. Rather, we perceive in an "ambient visual array" that is constantly in motion. This explains why we can visualize that which is all around us even when it is not within our line of vision, or when there are obstacles such as walls in the way. Additionally, our visual perception can neither be separated from our environment nor from other past, present and future sensory stimuli. Perception is holistic. He develops these observations into his theory of "affordances," by which he means that animals apprehend visual stimuli directly from what it "affords" a living organism in a particular environment for their prospects of individual and species survival. 
There are issues with the application of Gibsonian theory to cross-cultural human productions. Tim Ingold (2000. The Perception of the Environment: Essays in Livelihood, Dwelling and Skill. London: Routledge) has done the most extensive integration of Gibsonian theory into a cross-cultural anthropological framework. Ingold developed a theory of "skills" as a means by which meaning arises directly out of perceptual interaction with specific environments. It should be noted that Gibson's "ecological theory of perception" argues against the cognitivists who posit that the mind generates interpretive frameworks for perceptual data. Gibson argues instead that meanings and values arise directly out of the perceptual experience. Ingold supports and elaborates this view. 
In my own work, most particularly, "Beavers and Sheep: Visual Appearance and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Algonquin-Anglo Relations" (full citation available in my RG profile), I attempted to integrate the Gibsonian theory of perception with Lakoff and Johnson's (1980. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press) theory of "metaphors we live by" As an anthropologist, I see human culture as saturated in symbols, as well as narrative frameworks. I can't set aside the role of symbols and narratives in the production of aesthetic meaning and value. 
I am still working through these issues, so I am looking forward to the seeing the directions this discussion takes. 
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Since there are no topics that address Visual Literacy I thought it was overdue. So how do you define these literacies and what goals should we set at each level of development to educate students on the consumption and production of images?
How can we help develop/ instill a critical approach to visual culture where students thoughtfully question the motivations and sites of production of the imagery they encounter on a daily basis?  
Looking at the recent release of National Core Arts Standards (in the US) http://www.nationalartsstandards.org/ does it do enough to address visual and media literacies? What competencies or components might you add? 
Should the teaching of such literacies be restricted to the arts? What other subjects areas do you see these literacies playing an important role in?
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In the English National Curriculum for English Language and Media Studies at both GCSE and A Level there are requirements for students to consider the messages in visual imagery. See the attached website for one exam board (there are others) http://www.aqa.org.uk Younger students in the UK are expected, as part of their English Language course, to develop an understanding and appreciation of how images can be constructed to convey messages and to analyse them. As a starting point students are asked to look at an image and describe what they see, to try to stay with only what is in the picture and refer to specific aspects. They are then encouraged to think about what emotions/feelings the image evokes in them. They may then consider an image in a range of contexts - appeal for donations, attached to a newspaper story, illustration in a story, illustration in a non-fiction text. They would produce their own text with images for a specific purpose. In moving image the sequencing of shots, and angles would also be explored. There has been lots of interesting work done.
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I'm having a hard time finding any data on the assessment of student motivation in art class in particular. From experience, I know that the different levels of mastery, the variety of the projects, etc. have an impact on the interest a student will have in participating fully in the activities of the class. However, I need scientific information on this problem for my research. My study is at high school level (12-14 years old) but data at any school level would be helpful.
So far, this is the only relevant study I could find:
Potter, E. F., & Edens, K. M. (2001). Children's Motivational Beliefs about Art: Exploring Age Differences and Relation to Drawing Behavior.
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I understood what you meant by "group of interest". I just wanted to add in my response that I also looked into the concept of "interest" since it is often related to motivation and it could explain one of the reasons why some students engage in art projects. But because it doesn't account for the different levels of competence or previous knowledge, for example, I preferred the self-determination theory as a conceptual model for my research.
The paper you suggested seems very promising! I'm glad I asked a question here because I would've never made the link with motivation in arts, openness and trait theory. I always perceived the problem mostly from external factors such as difficulty of the tasks or curricular obligation to follow art classes and a little bit from internal ones such as one's own sens of competence. Now I would like to see how openness to engage in new activities relates to intrinsic and extrinsic motivation...
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I am a Dutch Art teacher searching for a new direction in teaching art.
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Edgar
Allow me to over simplify an answer via TPACK9 to your question:
1. Active = Behaviouralism = Technology as Tools ---> Increase Capabilities [doing minus interacting]
2. Constructive = Constructivism/ Cognitivism = Technology as Media --> Encode/ Decode Meanings, Sense-Making [knowing]
3. Interactive = Connectivism = Technology as Social Actors ---> Being and relating with others
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Cultural transmission in animals is well accepted, but what about art produced by wildlife? Do animals produce art?
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If you enter 'animal art' in Google Scholar, you end up with more than 3 million hits!
One example mentioning animal art in the title of a scientific publication is indicated below:
Jared Diamond. 1986. Animal art: Variation in bower decorating style among male
bowerbirds Amblyornis inornatus. Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 83, pp. 3042-3046, May 1986
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University art teaching qualifications
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There a lot of good reasons to get a PhD. Relegating it to a baseline teaching certificate sort of misses the point of a research degree. Where there is a research culture and funding to develop new work in the field it makes good sense to seek out new hires with said degree or equivalent experience.
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Along with my colleague Jessica Schwarzenbach, I am engaged in research into the so called terminal degrees in fine art. Art education has always been somewhat controversial as evidenced in the UK where, some 40 years ago, there was much debate about the initiation of the bachelors degree and later the masters in fine art. At present in the UK, what in the US would be called the terminal degree in fine art is the PhD in fine art which incorporates a significant studio component and the dissertation methodology is the art practice itself. In the US however, the terminal degree is the MFA with PhDs being restricted to art historians and art theoreticians. As well as existing in the UK the fine art PhD can be undertaken across the globe. Over the past decade or so there have been some moves to establish the studio based PhD in fine art in colleges in the UD.
What do you think should be the terminal degree in fine art and why? Do you think this degree should be available in the US?
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Fine arts is not my area in professional practice. I will share ideas in a general perspective. I agree that the terminal degree in fine art is PhD because of vertical trajectory and worldwide recognition for phd as the highest level of education entering the expert level. However I will look into the phd curriculum design for fine arts professionals, environment where the professional practice exist, interdisciplinary collaboration, and global market relevance.
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A recent post by Science Writers directed my attention to some very interesting guides and resources in the field of journalism as well as art/cultural mobility, that is mobility of artists, professionals and journalists in various cultural domains.
is about a forthcoming free online course in data journalism (basic understanding of data such as spreadsheets, stats, graphs and how to incorporate data in storytelling) which is due to start in May 2014 and is open to anyone.
Data Driven Journalism is behind the freely available Data Journalism Handbook which can be found here http://datajournalismhandbook.org/1.0/en/index.html
Journalists and (freelance) writers and researchers may also find useful some of the resources shared by the International Journalists Network, such as those on emerging online platforms http://ijnet.org/stories/five-platforms-could-jump-start-your-freelance-career-2014 and social media tools http://ijnet.org/blog/2013s-top-social-media-tools-journalists
A recent online project targeting science journalists in Australia could also benefit writers, researchers and all people interested in science writing. SCIJOURNO is comprised of 6 modules - a mix of video and article-based content packed with useful links incl. case studies, media tools, organizations and relevant online guides: http://scijourno.com.au/
Generally, funding for cultural journalists is not easy to find but recently a guide of funding opportunities in Europe has been compiled by On the Move - an international association aimed at supporting and facilitating mobility of culture professionals and artists: http://on-the-move.org/files/final%20UTA%20guide.pdf
The association has published as well a number of funding guides addressed to the inbound and outbound mobility of artists and culture professionals in
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You're welcome!
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What are the best techniques to get the balance right when you are teaching a first year class that is mainly computing students, but a minority of arts-based students and keep all in engaged (as far as possible)?
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I work with STEM to STEAM. Just completed two projects with undergraduate students (including math and science majors) as well as students in the humanities. We did small robotic/kinesthetic sculptures for one project, looking at the physics/motion and links between motion and aesthetics. The next project was animation where students chose which form of animation to use, incorporating a range of animation platforms, low and high tech. This summer I'm going to learn arduino and start introducing basic programming into my visual arts courses.
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In recent years, massive open online courses (MOOCs) brought about a newfound interest in online education. However, it seems to me the adoption of e-learning by educational agents is greatest when the teaching is about hard science, technology and engineering subjects. Do the particularities of arts education - especially when the learning of a craft is involved - mean higher education institutions dedicated to the Arts are safe from 'disruption'?
I am just starting my PhD and would really appreciate some pointers.
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Thank you! It's interesting to notice that students and teachers of music seem those in the field of the Arts most eager to adopt distance education, from YouTube guitar lessons to the Berklee MOOC - http://www.berklee.edu/
This reminds me of something that is a little bit off-topic (and perhaps I'll move it to a new question): I was used to think media studies (inc. film, etc.) classes would be tough to translate to a good MOOC due to copyright issues (film criticism videos on YouTube/Vimeo often use stills instead of showing movie excerpts because of this). A big university or school may obtain licenses from distributors, but even that may lead to the some limitations on the syllabus. So I wonder how the Eastman School deals with the music licensing as I believe their MOOC surely will imply the dissemination of copyrighted material on the Web.