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Aquatic Ecosystems - Science topic

Aquatic Ecosystems are marine and freshwater aquatic ecology and hydrobiology
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Dear RG community members,
having in mind that I have really low rate of knowledge on carbon sequestration, I will need your help. My questaion is, which methodology and monitoring systems should be used for the calculation of carbon sequestration in wetlands?
Thank you,
regards from Croatia,
Zlatko
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Aquatic flora are to be collected and species wise biomass to be recorded and finally CHN analyser to be used
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I thought there would be more work done on the topic; there doesn't seem to be very many papers.
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You can consult this forest Report under the green India Mission
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At present, the measurement of greenhouse gases in aquatic ecosystem is often used in situ measurement and model simulation. I am interested in whether remote sensing can reverse the emission of greenhouse gases in aquatic ecosystem. Is there anyone who does this work? Are there any recommended articles?
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Dear Yadi,
could you be more precise on what exactly you mean by "reverse"? I am not quite sure whether you are looking for new techniques (such as remote sensing) to MEASURE greenhouse gases in aquatic ecosystems or whether you are looking for new ways to REDUCE/MITIGATE emissions from aquatic ecosystems (or potentially even ways to enhance their storage capacity as carbon sinks).
Thanks & best wishes to Beijing,
Julius
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I wanted to ask that if we have to develop a modelling tool to anticipate the impacts of weather extreme events on the water quality of a lake but the amount of information collected in the field is scarce. What kind of models would be better to use and which are the natural processes we should include in the models. Please guide me briefly if possible.
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I think mike she will be best suited for integrated hydro metrological and water quality modelling purpose
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Globally, there are more than 45,000 large dams in operation in over 150 countries and another 1500 or so are currently under construction according to World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Dams and weirs have been built on rivers (a barrier across a river) to achieve a number of benefits including water storage, irrigation supply, drinking water, preventing floods, navigation, hydroelectricity production, and recreation etc. In recent time, most dam construction is taking place in the developing world, such as in China and India. 46 new large dams being planned or under construction in the Yangtze River basin in China; 27 in the La Plata basin in South America; 26 in the Tigris and Euphrates Basin in Turkey, Syria and Iraq. Dams are also planned on three other rivers: the Salween in China, Thailand and Myanmar, the Kizilirmak in Turkey, and the Ganges in China, Nepal, India and Bangladesh.
The development of engineering infrastructure such as dams and weirs over rivers has modified rivers ecosystems threatening the water quality (e.g. salinity, cold water pollution) and water dependent biodiversity (e.g. native fish). Dams disconnect rivers from their flood plains and wetlands, reduce water flows in rivers, and affect the migratory patterns of fish. In general, water retention by dams eliminates or reduces spring runoff or flood pulses that often play a critical role in maintaining downstream riparian and wetland ecosystems including the lifecycle of fish. Older dams release water that is stored at the bottom of the dam, which is typically colder and adversely affects species adapted to warmer temperatures. Such an effect is sometime referred to as ‘cold water pollution’. The construction of a dam on a river can block or delay upstream fish migration between feeding and breeding zones and thus may contribute to the decline and even the extinction of species. As a consequence of dams, for example, some unique species and habitats are/will be threatened including freshwater native fish, river dolphins, porpoises and water birds. One estimate reveals that dams and associated uses of water have altered two-thirds of the world’s major rivers.
In Australia, the Federal Government Department (Commonwealth Environmental Water Office) has acquired/is acquiring water with the goals/objectives to increase water flows in rivers and wetlands (commonwealth environmental water). Reduced flows in the Murray Darling Basin (MDB) have already caused environmental problems (increased salinity, increased algal blooms/cyanobacterial blooms, decline in native fish and bird populations and poor wetland health). This environmental water has been/is being recovered through water saving infrastructure upgrades, water purchases (direct buybacks of water entitlements from irrigators) and other water recovery programmes in order to protect or restore the environmental assets of the MDB. The environmental water will help protect and restore the resilience of the MDB’s rivers, wetlands, floodplains, lakes and red gum forests, together with the plants and animals that depend on them. In a number of countries (e.g. third world countries), people may not be familiar with environmental water or environmental flows and a need for environmental water for biodiversity.
Question: Do you agree that there is a need for environmental water/environmental flows to protect biodiversity where dams have been built or to be built? If so, how can we achieve a balance between water usages for consumptive purposes (drinking water, industry and irrigated agriculture) and meeting the demand for environmental flows for smooth functioning of river ecosystems and river biodiversity?
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You raised a very important question.
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I need to know Pollutants that are washed to the fresh water ecosystem, and bring disturbance to the fresh water species. Moreover, I wanted to understand the freshwater ecosystem based on regions: African freshwater, Asian freshwater, Latin American freshwater, North American Freshwater, Australian freshwater ecosystem. Generally, my aspiration is to know the state of global freshwater ecosystem. Hence, anyone who can supply me relevant materials on this concept is well come.
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They are : habitat modification, fragmentation, and destruction; invasive species; overfishing; environmental pollution; forestry practise; and climate change.
Full details in the link:
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Please share your thoughts with or against and why, there is no one perfect answer to this question. Since aquatic ponds could introduce weedy plants and due to the high rate of evaporation salinization could occur over a long period of time.
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Ecological disaster seems to me a bit exagerated. But yes, @Mansur Taleb Abdullah, an anaerobic wastewater polishing pond will probably salinize over time, in tropical desert conditions. You can also expect organic- and phosphate-rich sediment deposition, and eutrophisation on the long term. A correctly insulated, subsurface-type constructed wetland would perhaps prevent both damages, or at least, largely extend the useful operation time. It could also restrict the propagation of invasive weeds.
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It's the measurement of degree of dryness but I'm bit confused with the values. Why is it lowest for hyperarid region and highest for sub-humid?
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Aridity index =
No. Of rainy days x mean precipitation/day
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Temp.+10
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In many conservatories around the world, as well as in many organic-farms, insecticidal soaps (potassium salts of fatty acids) are widely used to combat aphids, mealybugs, mites etc. They are considered safe to mammalians and are prioritized instead of chemicals.
Very little to no information can actually be found whether the soaps may be toxic to amphibians. Can anyone help us on this matter? An eductaed guess would tell me that the thin film created by the sopa on aquatic enviroment as well as, presumably, on the skin of the amphibians would cause significan damage.
Many thanks!
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I looked up the technical fact sheet and although there was no specific mention about amphibians apparently it is toxic for fish and aquatic invertebrates and the EPA requires it not to be applied to water or to contaminate water sources with it. I think this supports your hunch.
"Scientists concluded that potassium salts of fatty acids are slightly toxic to cold-water and warm-water fish (1)."
"Potassium salts of fatty acids are highly toxic to aquatic invertebrates."
"The EPA requires all product labels containing this active ingredient to state that the product is not to be applied directly to water and the user is not to contaminate water by cleaning equipment or disposing of wash water that contains potassium salts of fatty acids (1, 11)."
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From your viewpoint, what are the future main challenges in studying Biomes, Biogeography, Terrestrial & Aquatic Ecosystems of the World?
Best regards,
Saeed
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Discussion about biodiversity is specifically important especially under the uprising pressure of climate change nowadays, which is profoundly becoming to be shown as natural disturbance in some specific areas.
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Microplastics have been found in land, air, freshwater, effluent from a wastewater treatment plant and even in tap water and bottled water. The small plastic particles (less than 5 mm) pose a threat to the freshwater and marine ecosystem including fish and mussels due to potential adsorption of hydrophobic contaminants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into the body of microplastics depending on size and shape of particles. The land application of sewage sludge along with the sludge produced from water treatment process (sedimentation tank) is a large source of microplastics pollution in freshwater. The run off resulted from precipitation and high wind cause transport of microplastics from a place far from where it is produced. This is an acute problem, particularly for the regions of the world where sewage is not even treated up to the secondary treatment level and the target effluent quality is poorly managed. So, the question is: can microplastics be controlled in a watershed and if so, how?
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This is a question that everyone is struggling with, and there are no definitive answers. I think it's likely that some technological methodologies will continue to develop that enable us to do some removal in future. More degradable polymers will be developed and move through into products, causing similar problems but for much less time. There appear to be several interesting microbiological avenues that offer digestion of troublesome plastics too. There is also a role for effective capture of waste plastics, so that inadvertent loss to the environment is really infrequent.
Ultimately though, the most powerful tools are changing consumer expectations and behaviors so that fewer macroplastics and microplastics are produced, discarded and reach the environment. On top of that perhaps is considering a more realistic financial value being placed on plastics, reflecting their life cycle impacts and environmental issues and not just the production cost.
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Who knows this organism? Species or at least organismic group. Photosynthetic and covering large water surfaces.
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Dear Gregor,
Sorry, it looks dissimilar with any Nostoc and Utricularia.
This net of folds and bubbles is formed from neuston film floating at the water surface and completely covering this puddle. Several groups of algae can be responsible for this pattern of this color, e.g. some Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae and even Euglenozoa. The color of this film is not so suitable for cyanobacteria, but it need to be checked with microscopy.
Anyway, this habit of water body indicates its highly eutrophic status and high content of biogens and probably labile organic matter.
The miscroscopy of this film is essential for further ID.
Best regards,
Roman
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This species was isolated from freshwater pond here in Perlis, Malaysia. Unfortunately, I'm not certain about the name for this species. The size of this microalgae in range 2.5-3.5 micron. Is this Oocystis sp.?
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It can be the chlamydomonas sp.
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What are the harmful effects of water polluted by pesticides on the aquatic ecosystem ?
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The biggest threats posed by pesticides is bio-accumulation and bio-magnification in the system as well as the aquatic organisms. This not only causes heavy biodiversity losses but have an adverse effect on the endocrine system of the aquatic organisms especially fish. Being potential endocrine disruptors pesticide cause delay gondal maturity which in-turn have a great effect on the breeding and recruitment pattern. Pesticides concentrations above permissible level can cause oxidative damage to fish tissues, histopathological alterations and mutagenic changes. There is a long list. If you are still more interested i can forward you my research on pesticides.
Thankyou
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Hello everyone, greeting, hope you are doing well, I need some significant information, which is related to the use of silver nanoparticles in the aquatic ecosystem. My question is this when we apply different concentrations of Ag-NPs on Ciliates to check the toxicity of silver nanoparticles. We know that silver nanoparticles kill the ciliates, disturb the aquatic ecosystem. Anxiously waiting for your kind response. Thank You
Md. Masud Parvez.
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Although, it depend on your objectives, otherwise your expectations from using different AgNP concentrations to asses the toxicity of such Nanoparticles to ciliates. However, you have to bring in mind that increasing the concentration in aquatic system would forcefully increase agglomeration rates either auto-agglomeration or hetero-agglomeration, that means yo will increase the potential formation of bio-eco-corona, which forcefully will lead to an increase in the dynamic size of your particles, thus decreasing the bio-availability, in case that you aim to use natural entry into organisms.
Otherwise, it might be possible that you want to know which is the most suitable moment to add your AgNPs to the exposure media, that means that you have other considerations to take into account dependently on the type of exposure (in vivo as exemple...etc).
Furthermore, its important to highlight, that in general when there is no previous studies have been done using the model-organism, nor the pollutant that you aim to use, you may use to determinate the LC50, which also presents some controversies among nanotoxicity community, because the matter of the bio-availability, which may be reduced once the concentration (i.e. mass concentration) have been increased.
I hope that this helps you, otherwise please do not hesitate to ask for any further information that you feel may helps you.
Best wishes,
Younes,
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What are the harmful effects of eutrophication on the aquatic ecosystem ?
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Fish kill, oxygen depletion, little sunlight which reduces the activities of phytoplantons thereby affecting the entire ecosystem.
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Is there any effects of air pollution (NO2 in this case) to water ecosystems through Nitrogen cycle. Has anyone researched in practice this type of associations? what people think is there direct link between these to parameters?
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When NO2 and NOx interact with water, oxygen and some other chemicals in atmosphere and form acid rain. ultimately acid rain harms ecosystems e.g. lakes and forests.
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Trying to explore new avenues of study linking urban development and pollution in aquatic ecosystems.
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Dear Kudzai:
The coupling between urban development and pollution in aquatic ecosystems is quite interesting. Many factors of both affect each other. You could analyse demographic dynamics and migration and its impacts on fresh water ecosystems pollution.
Additionally, since 2009, Rockström, J. et al. from Stockholm Resilience Centre have been developing a novel approach known as Planetary Boundaries (PB). Global freshwater use, and change in land use are two of this PB, that could give another perspective on your research, and maybe you find a gap here.
Plus this could illuminate your research:
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The presence, prevalence, occurrence frequency and parasitization frequency of different parasites of fishes vary depending on water quality status. Possibly water temperature, dissolved oxygen, BOD, COD influence the which, where, how much parasites prevail and parasitize fish host. Further fish health.is impacted by water quality. Degraded physicochemical regime adversely affect fish health and fish subject to multiple stressors are much more vulnerable to parasitic infestation. Insightful discussions are welcome to unveil the interactionbetween/among degraded water quality factors and parasites as well as between/among multiple stressor induced  ill health related  biological, haematological, immunological, biochemical parameters.  Also share your views about biochemical/stress markers can be counted as indicative to those interactions
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Parasites have been used as bioindicators for habitat types or areas, for years and for species hots using the indicator value methods , I have attached this files
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As we know, the temperature is directly proportional to pH. It means low temperature and low pH during the morning and high temperature and high pH during the evening in an aquatic ecosystem/pond/outdoor cemented tanks. But, I observed an inverse relationship between temperature and pH in indoor tanks in wet-lab. What is the reason for the above mentioned?
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Photosynthesis is an important driver here. The plants (algae and macrophytes) take up the carbon dioxide during photosynthesis, which peaks in the afternoon (sunlight + temperature). In more eutrophic systems, the plants take up more carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide reaeration from the atmosphere eventually replaces the lost CO2 after photosynthesis stops. The carbon dioxide dissociates into carbonic acid, dropping the pH. If you're inside, then you don't have so much photosynthesis, so the temperature-pH effect can have an over-riding effect.
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pH range for surface will be 6-8 or 5.5-8 otherwise aquatic ecosystem will be destroyed. For aquatic plant needs carbon dioxide to do photosynthesis process for their food production. But, there is no carbon dioxide at pH 8 or above in a water body. Dissolve oxygen and carbon dioxide are equally important for aquatic ecosystem.
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Thanks for your replied regarding pH range of surface water. It is better that I will write an article on surface water pH range. I have been teaching Environmental Chemistry since 2000 in Department of Environmental Sciences but I realized the importance of carbon dioxides on pH dependency in 2011. So, It is needed to rethink regarding pH range of surface water Locally, regionally and Internationally.
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We are planning to inventory the black and red corals growing on the Mediterranean sea bottom. I read about various methods amongst them the use of ROV with Sea bottom imaging sensors and cameras.
How to efficiently inventory Precious corals (Black, Gold & red)?
What are the most efficient gears to use for sea bottom surveying such species?
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It's an old topic, but, Are you sure to give available data (Geographic coordinates) for this undangered species?
Regards
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It is experimentally proved that turf algae in combination with sediment prevents the settlement of coral larvae. My field observations are contradictory to it. I observed lot of new recruits on hard substrate which has been covered with turf algae and sediment. Is there any other factor which could aid the settlement of coral larvae on a turf algal substrate?
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I have analyzed the concentration of heavy metals in water as well as the intertidal sediment. I have not been able to find literature as to why the heavy metal content in sediment is more than the water. Can anyone help me? I would also like to know the permissible range for various heavy metals in marine water sample and sediment.
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I studied the fluxes between sediment and water in heavy metal in very polluted river sediments. Redox conditions and dissolved organic matter have a very important role
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I intend to understand how sustainable an aquatic ecosystem is based on its plankton population. Can anyone help me with suitable methods available?
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The species composition of the plankton community is very variable in the same place throughout the year. Therefore, based on the species composition it is difficult or impossible to draw a correct conclusion about the stability of the ecosystem. Moreover, the variability of species composition of individual communities is aimed at ensuring the functional stability of the ecosystem. The functional stability of the ecosystem is determined by the ratio of the processes of creation and destruction of living matter, primary photosynthetic production and destruction of organic matter, the balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide.
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Which is the best software for flood modelling in urbanized areas?
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EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is used throughout the world for planning, analysis and design related to stormwater runoff, combined and sanitary sewers, and other drainage systems in urban areas. There are many applications for drainage systems in non-urban areas as well.
SWMM is a dynamic hydrology-hydraulic water quality simulation model. It is used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. The runoff component operates on a collection of sub catchment areas that receive precipitation and generate runoff and pollutant loads. The routing portion transports this runoff through a system of pipes, channels, storage/treatment devices, pumps, and regulators.
SWMM tracks the quantity and quality of runoff made within each sub catchment. It tracks the flow rate, flow depth, and quality of water in each pipe and channel during a simulation period made up of multiple time steps. SWMM also models the hydrologic performance of specific types of low impact development (LID) controls.
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Hello, any successful/ unsuccessful examples of Artificial Floating Islands in aquatic ecosystem restoration. Recently, I visited Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. & I saw AFIs well managed there.
If anybody working in AFIs, (Lake Kasumigaura, particularly) please share how far the success rate with AFIs? & how to choose AFI plants for a particular waterbody?
Thanks in Advance!
Best regards
Anila P Ajayan
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I have a long term dataset which includes a variety of chemical and physical water variables sampled from an inland river. These variables include: metal loads (Al, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Na, K, Pb, Ni, Zn); in Situ measurements (Electrical conductivity [EC], water temperature, air temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH); water nutrients (Ammonium, Chloride, Nitrate, Phosphate, Sulphate, Total Organic Carbon [TOC], Dissolved Organic Carbon [DOC]); and others (Acid capacity, base capacity). Some of these variables (e.g. chloride, EC, ammonium, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, pH, sulphate, TOC and water temperature) were sampled consistently and therefore have a good resolution, whereas others (e.g. metal loads [Al, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb, Ni, Zn], acid capacity and base capacity) were sampled less frequently and therefore do not have the same data resolution.
With that said, the focus of my research is not exactly the chemical interactions of DOC and other chemical constituents per se, but rather the interaction and effect of DOC on freshwater macroinvertebrate taxa. I do, however, understand that the interaction of DOC with other water chemical properties is of vital importance and ones needs to consider these interactions.
Therefore, I would like to know what variables (from the lists mentioned above) are the most likely to interact with DOC within the freshwater environment. This will aid in my selection of the relevant variables that I will carry into further statistical analyses.
Any help in this regard would be greatly appreciated.
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Hi Nathan, we have high DOC and highly colored waters here in Maine. DOC is both an acid and contributes to alkalinity. We tend to have alkalinity even below pH 5 where the carbonate system is exhausted. DOC makes are streams and lakes more acidic for a given alkalinity, but DOC also supplies acid neutralizing capacity when pH is below 5. DOC is negatively charged and attracts and binds cations. This make heavy metals and Aluminum less toxic. Because lakes are solar collectors and because DOC is digested by UV light, there is a lot of clearing of water color in lakes. Maine streams are often tea or even coffee colored while lakes can be crystal clear. This digestion process releases Al, Fe and phosporus, generates alkalinity (or was it acidity? any chemists out there?), and precipitates TP as aluminum and iron compounds. Ferrous iron binds P, but will release it during reducing conditions (such as low oxygen conditions in the winter). Aluminum does not do that and is a permanent loss of TP in the bottom of the lake. Fish and macroinvertebrates benefit from DOC when soils are acidic and Al is mobilized. Ionic Al is bound by the DOC and particulate (POC) forms. Episodic pH drops can release Al and put in back into the toxic form and can lead to fish kills. Macroinvertebrates may also be killed and will drift downstream. So for the most part DOC is natural, important, and helpful for wildlife. Climate change probably increases the decomposition of organic matter in soils, leading to more DOC export from watersheds.
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The pufferfish also referred to as fugufish, blowfish or globefish is said to be the second most poisonous vertebrae on earth next to the tiny golden poison frog from Colombia. The toxin responsible for the pufferfish's deadly character is tetrodotoxin.
Two members of a family have died in Ghana today because of consuming this fish. What do you know about this fish and it's toxic element? How do we intensify public health education? Kindly share your valuable views. Thanks in advance.
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I follow
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Dear Researchers,
please share your valuable understanding on the 'gap in knowledge' especially in freshwater phytoplankton study. How do it dis/similar with 'limitations in study'? Is there any relation with each other?
Thanks in Advance.
sincerely
Anila P Ajayan
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'Gap in knowledge' can be applicable to any field of study or scientific discipline. Basically it means there are several aspects of any particular subject, in your case being freshwater phytoplankton that have not yet been worked out, discovered and/or not well discussed that need detailed studies or further evaluations. 'Limitations in study' stand completely different as they are the influences which a researcher cannot control and can include any shortcomings that restrict his/her work methodology and to a certain extent the conclusions too.
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Hope everyone hear's the news that the III world war might be on the basis of hunting of freshwater resources. Right now we are moving fast in decline phase. How to restore the natural system of aquatic ecosystem? as a scientific community we can serve our next generation with somewhat good quality of natural resources. Could anyone help in this regard?
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Hi Mophin,
I agree with you in the need to focusing on restore aquatic ecosystems, and recover the many ecosystem services we have from them as well as the aquatic biodiversity (actually threatened) who used to live there.
There are some experiences indicating that water quality parameters are recovering faster than ecological communities. I think we need an integrative approach, with biophysical and social values together. Water and then aquatic ecosystems are meaningful for society.
Best,
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There are different international law, doctrines for Trans Boundary Water Resources, such as:
1. Absolute territorial sovereignty theory
2. Absolute territorial integrity theory
3. Theory of limited territorial sovereignty.
4. Water Rights Based on Previous Use or Prior Appropriation
5. Riparian water rights
Although water covers more than two-thirds of the earth's surface, but 97% is in oceans and 2℅ locked in ice-cap and not available to human beings for consumption. Only 1℅ is termed as fresh water (surface & ground water). Therefore, water as a limited resource that is in great demand. The manner in which this demand is satisfied varies according to the jurisdiction in which a water supply is located. In case of trans-water resources, the upstream country has got upper hand to manipulate the river flow. This manipulation can be interpreted under various approaches and doctrines. Each approach has its weaknesses, and jurisdictions will continue experimenting with established legal doctrines to better accommodate the supply and demand of water rights.
Various treaties concluded to decide on the water. Question arose, either there is any such doctrines exists that protecting the ecology?
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All laws/ doctrines were developed by the powerful to satisfy their own greed. UN discredited itself with the 1992 Dublin Statement, declaring water as a commodity. EU water directive follows the same lines. USA has 'John Wayne' law or 'cowboy economics' as Vandana Shiva put it. The 2008 constitution of Ecuador recognized the right of nature and the ecosystems to exist and flourish, just like any living being. It gave water the status of a patrimony, which needs to be preserved for posterity, and that its provision should not be a marketable service. The Bolivian government also passed laws in 2010 and 2012 treating ‘mother earth’ as a subject of public interest. That's the spirit, "that water is the mother of all of us who nurtures us and that it is time we start nurturing her", that should be the basis of any conversation on sharing and caring of any river. NOBODY OWNS WATER, WE ALL ARE USERS. The discussions should involve all users and develop CONSENSUS on how to care for mother-water. I invite you to browse some write-ups in our project on 'water nurturing':
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Chemical Oxygen Demand is a common problem water test. Silver sulfate is used as a catalyst. Sometimes, if AgSO4 is not available, we can use AgNO3 as a catalyst or not.
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Presence of Chlorides boost COD value. For this purpose Mercuric sulfate is used to avoid Chlorides interference. Some researches have suggested pre-treatment with silver nitrate in a controlled manner.
Presence of NO2 ions also add to COD values. But NO3 ion has got no such interference.
If SO4 ion is working as catalyst, we have to Search out sulfate salt.
If Ag ion is working as catalyst, we can search out alternative of silver.
If both ions (Ag and SO4) are working as catalyst, we may have no alternative, or we may have other metallic salt as alternative, or a combination of two different salts in different composition.
Anyhow, I am also searching the answer. When I can access any such research, I will share here.
I am sure, some one may have studied this.
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Eutrophication is defined as the nutrient enrichment of an aquatic ecosystem. This factor favors the proliferation of organisms that consume the nutrients and oxygen.
my question is:
Is it possible to relate these events to climate change? obviating the contribution of direct nutrients by human action.
thank you
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Dear, have look at very interesting attached PDF.
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Hello all.
I would like to get some suggestions regarding how water quality can be related with Water for Sustainable Development particularly in bio monitoring studies. Can anybody provide me some valuable insights.
Thanks in Advance.
sincerely
Anila P Ajayan
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Dear Anila
Unfortunately, Sustainable development have a great dimension of anthropogenic vision. We need to assess aquatic ecosystems to conserve them in their most original form. If we protect aquatic life, we will have a healthy aquatic ecosystem, only then, the resource will be available for this and the following generations.
Best regards.
Perhaps the following papers may be helpful:
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The concept of climax community and succession particularly in terrestrial or water ecosystems where perturbations occur are interesting phenomena. Related concepts such as keystone species are also very important. But do these concepts apply in the microbial world where environmental changes drastically shift population and community dynamics in a very short time frame?
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CiteScore metrics are calculated from Scopus indexed sources.
In comparison, the Impact Factor is generated from the Journal Citation Reports [JCR], and not from the Web of Science.
This paper could be useful
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I got this jelly fish in huge quantity while trawling off Kochi.
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First Image Rhopilema sp, second and third are Cyanea sp.
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i am more interest to know what kind of hypothesis, question, or objective that each index usually answer. surprisingly that both indices has quite the same definition in a term of scribing the reason of using them to define diversity.  i calculate both indices and i would like to discuss the results. simply my objective is to see if there are special and temporal differences in phytoplankton diversity among 8 sampling stations.
  also i am interested to know what are the main objectives or questions of your researches that you answered using such indices. thanks
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Parallel use of species diversity indices in ecological studies is a general practice, and a typical case is the parallel application of the
Shannon–Wiener and Simpson index. However, while the Shannon–Wiener index is strongly influenced by species richness and by
rare species, the Simpson index gives more weight to evenness and common species. The effect of the sample size is generally
negligible for both of them.
The use of both diversity indices improves the output information of the dataset, which is unique for each community or sample
analyzed. Looking at the wider content—both emphasizing the richness, and the specimen distribution into the individual
species—adds to the more complex information of the diversity in ecosystems.
In this sense, H has an advantage over D because it depends more on species richness and less abundant species, so it is very
sensitive to even small diversity changes, and thus is widely used to assess the actual state of environment. On the other hand, D has
the advantage over H in counting more on dominant species and is not affected by less abundant elements; therefore, it is used to
show the trend of ecosystem diversity heading.
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Today 25-01-2018 we documented more than a lakhs no of Faunus ater (Linnaeus, 1758) were seen in small estuary. Watch this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7BA1OvrN-k&feature=share .
This species are any indicator of usual.
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Similar documentation was done by our team at Aadbandhar in Maharashtra a couple of years ago.
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I am looking for a literature review that shows positive results of how technological innovation can trigger policy reform and therefore better regulation in the field of water and ecosystem management.
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Saw this article a couple of years ago, may be of interest to your question?
Jaffe, A. B., Newell, R. G., & Stavins, R. N. (2002). Environmental policy and technological change. Environmental and resource economics, 22(1), 41-70.
Also this one,
Ambec, S., Cohen, M. A., Elgie, S., & Lanoie, P. (2013). The Porter hypothesis at 20: can environmental regulation enhance innovation and competitiveness?. Review of environmental economics and policy, 7(1), 2-22.
Perhaps you have already seen these, but they might be good leads to support your ideas. Hope this helps!
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I refer to both lotic and lentic waters in Europe.
I am particularly interested in bog/peatland classification.
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Comprehensive volume describes how ecosystem services-based approaches can assist in addressing major global and regional water challenges, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, and water security in the developing world, by integrating scientific knowledge from different disciplines, such as hydrological modelling and environmental economics. As well as consolidating current thinking, the book also takes a more innovative approach to these challenges, involving disciplines such as psychology and international law. Empirical assessments at the national, catchment, and regional levels are used to critically appraise this systemic approach, and the merits and potential limitations are presented. The practicalities of this approach with regard to water resources management, nature conservation, and sustainable business practices are discussed, and the role of society in underpinning the concept of ecosystem services is explored. Presenting new insights and perspectives on how to shape future strategies, this contributory volume is a valuable reference for researchers, academics, students, and policy makers, in environmental studies, hydrology, water resource management, ecology, environmental law, policy and economics, and conservation biology.
Enclosed below are some interesting PDFs for further reading...
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The major chunk of Carbon is sequestered into sea. The forest growth is almost at a stationary phase means no incremental growth is reported in forest. In this scenario, my concern is about the reality the forest contribution towards C-sequestration. Either it contributing or not?
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I agree, but this brings us back to the conclusion that we need to consider the carrying capacity of the Earth for human beings, and adjust our numbers and methods of handling the coming problems responsibly. When other biota became too prolific and exceed the carrying capacity for them, they suffered a population collapse caused by famine . Sometimes pestlilence , war or suicide were involved, but there are numerous examples in the geological literature of where a once numerous species suffered a population collapse, usually ending in extinction. Humans have survived enormous climatic changes in the past by being adaptable, but currently, the young people appear to expect technology to make life comfortable and overcome any problems. Imagine the changes needed to handle the commencement of a major glaciation. The question is whether future populations will be able to adapt to the numerous new upcoming problems as well as to adjust to the spectacular changes that climate change can produce. Humans need to work together more to solve the upcoming problems or there will be a major catastrophe ahead for at least many of this species.
Stuart.
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For studying water chemistry, phytoplankton analysis or microbial analyses? 
Thanks in Advance for the valuable answers. 
sincerely
Anila Ajayan 
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Cowardin et al classification attached as one method to stratify units for sampling. I do not expect you would find a cook book approach, but reading about studies that have answered some of the questions about water quality and aquatic habitat, and consultation with the various types of aquatic specialists may be helpful to you as your proceed. Sometimes one might do a preliminary study before preceding. Often times, in lentic systems, measuring streamflow is very helpful to separate processes that occur during storms, baseflow, first storms after autumn leaf fall, variability of upstream land use activity, etc.
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Metal nanoparticles are showing promise in tackling different problems in different domains of environment. How they can be used in aquatic ecosystems? What are different likely interactions? What may the possible toxic effects on different ecosystem components (planktons, bacteria, macrophytes and fish)? How can we track the ecotoxicological linkages? How could we manage metal nanoparticles for positive (beneficial) uses and avert the adverse/untoward consequences?
RG friends and researchers you all are welcome to participate and help to promote a sustained brainstorming on pros and cons of apllyting metal nanoparticles in aquatic systems like, ponds, lakes, rivers, etc.  
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The best review article on "Nanoparticles in aquatic systems". I hope this review addresses most of your questions. Here is the link to access the paper.
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   My colleagues and I work on detection surfactant in Tigris river. We try to use biomarker in our study.I'm very appreciated If you could mention the biomarker for this purpose.
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Dear Dr. Fikrat,
I agree with Dr. Marcos Nobre
Best regards,
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I've recently (May, 2017) found moderate levels of Cladophora, Oscillatoria, and Lyngbia in a 2nd order, softwater, coldwater stream in northwestern New Jersey (USA). A concern has been expressed that presence of these algae may be evidence that nutrient polluted seepage from a septic system is entering the stream. I'm not so sure. I know that high biomass of Cladophora in the Great Lakes has been considered an indicator of nutrient pollution, and cyanobacteria are also often considered indicators of nutrient pollution. But I suspect that low to moderate levels of these algae occur naturally without any pollution, but I'm not sure.
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Anila,
Thanks for your response. Unfortunately no one else has responded, so no expert answers. Maybe if I ask a slightly different question, or rephrase this one, I'll get more response and some answers. But I'm not sure what to ask yet.
Richard
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I am looking for the BMWP taxa score table for BMWP-Columbia, like proposed by Gabriel Roldan-Perez (2003) in his book "Bioindicacion de La Calidad del Agua En Colombia: Propuesta Para El USO del Metodo Bmwp/Col." Does anyone have a copy of this score table?
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Hello Tor:
In this paper you can find the BMWP/Col taxa score table for Colombian rivers in the Andean region, from Zuñiga and Cardona which is the same score table proposed by Gabriel Roldan (2003).
Good luck
Regards,
Luis Miguel
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What is meant by ecosystem health?
Give an idea of ecosystem health profile.
State the indicators of ecosystem health?
How health deterioration is diagnosed?
How can health of an ecosystem be recovered?
What protective and ameliorative or therapeutic strategies can be adopted?
How indicators can tell about the good health, the bad health, deteriorating health or the recovering health?
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Hi Jayanata,
In his seminal 2003 book entitled "Managing for Healthy Ecosystems" (CRC Press) David J. Rapport refers to ecosystem health as the "capacity of a system to perform normal functions." In the Preface to the book the authors suggest that  "Ecosystem health  embodies the capacity of ecosystems to function without impairment." If you can get a copy of this book it is well worth it. To give you some idea how the concept of ecosystem health is being used in marine sciences I have attached a few reviews that you may find interesting. I hope this helps a bit.
Tomas
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How can we identify the species from the DNA cocktail we are getting as eDNA from water?
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Working on presence/abundance of Najas flexilis as we speak.
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Are there any publications or unpublished data on pheromones available for Boris schneideri (Insecta: Coleoptera)?
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Thank you for information, Dmitry
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If I was to investigate the impact of bivalve aquaculture on basin-scale sedimentation and nutrient flux, it is difficult to control for the effect of bivalve clearance on the basin-scale. Are there intra-basin-scale spatial statistical methods that can be employed to properly test the effect of bivalve seston clearance and sedimentation? If we have bivalve farms and reference areas in the same basin, how to measure the effect?
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I am conducting an experiment on rotifers. My experimental cultures got infected with naked amobeae, which obviously feed on my rotifers. I need to find a solution how to clear out the rotifer cultures of amoebae. 
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Thank you very much!
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A co-worker found this unknow flatworm along a citycanal in Amsterdam. We have no idea what this might be, so any help is welcome. It is probably non-indigenous. It was collected using a pondnet in the canal, but it may prove not to be aquatic after all.
Thanks, Ton
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Hugh Jones identified it as M.adventor
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Anyone knows about using the microbial enzimatic activity for characterizing the trophic conditions of salted lake?
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There is a significant relationship between ectoenzymatic activities (Esterase activity, Aminopeptidase activity & Alkaline Phosphatase activity) of heterotrophic bacteria and the trophic state index of the lakes.   Esterase activity (EsA) can be assayed fluorometrically as an increase of fluorescein concentration in water
samples incubated with fluorescein-diacetate (FDA).Aminopeptidase activity (AMP) is measured fluorometrically as rates of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (AMC) released in the course of L-leucine--4-methyl-cumarinylamid hydrochloride (Leu-MCA) hydrolysis by the aminopeptidase present in water samples. Alkaline phosphatase (APA) activity can be determined as the rates of increase in fluorescence of methylumbelliferone (MUF) (365 nm excitation and 460 nm emission) resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of non-fluorescent substrate methylumbelliferyl-phosphate (MUFP). The following references may be consulted for the purpose.
Hoppe (1983). Significance of exoenzymatic activities in the ecology of brackish water: measurements by means of methylumbelliferyl- substrates. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 11, 299.
Chrost et al. (1999). Fluorescein-diacetate (FDA) assay for determining microbial esterase activity in lake water. Arch. Hydrobio. Spec. Issues Adwanc. Limnol. 54, 167.
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Can Anyone help me with methodology and index use in phytoindication study of ecological status of aquatic environment using macrophytes and phytoplankton ,
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Thanks Nikolay
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I would like to obtain information to model development times at different temperatures of larvae of blue mussels belonging to the Mytilus edulis complex, especially those found in the northwest Atlantic: M. edulis sensu stricto, M. trossulus, and/or their hybrids.
I have found a number of old studies reporting growth (size increase, not development) and survival at different temperatures, and newer studies quantifying growth and development at a few temperatures plus further manipulations (e.g., different pH in ocean acidification studies), but haven't had much luck finding basic temperature-dependent development studies. I.E., a study rearing mussel larvae at multiple controlled temperatures and reporting times or rates of development (total and/or through specific stages). But, surely such information must be out there. Can someone please direct me to some useful sources?
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Sexual inversion of fish.
Monosex production for intensive cultivation.
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Thanks Tomas, I'm sure the articles will help!
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Bioturbation is the soil/sediment reworking by animals. It has a definite role in ecosystem engineering too by modifying and modulating different physicochemibal transformations and biological/microbiological interactions. Toxicants' transfers may be affected and ecotoxic effects may be modified. Can bioturbation be manipulated in reducing toxic effects of some toxicants and how?
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Dear Prof. Beauchamp & friends,
You have talked about bioremediation for cleaning up toxicants by different methods like biofiltration, biosparging, biostimulation, bioventing, composting, etc and dif methods of phytoremediation. Can you provide concrete information and research papers reflecting bioturbation induced enhanced microbial remediation.   But the focus of  my query has been bioturbation of soil and sediment. definitely different bioturbative mechanism like, burrowing, resuspension, bioirrigation/respiratory irrigation, filter feeding, benthic/bottom grazing, secretions, etc  exert considerable influence in altering the physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of soil or sediment habitat. Such bioturbation mechanisms had been dealt in my paper "Bioturbation potential of chironomid larvae for sediment-water ................"  published in Ecological Engineering (Elsevier) 35(2008):1444-1453. These mechansims might have significant impact on bioremediatin of toxicants mediated by microorganisms or by some other means and mechanisms. I am looking forward to some insightful intellectual and scientific exchange of ideas and relevant papers.
Regards
Jayanta
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hi,
im doing research on daily rainfall. thus, before i proceed to the further test, i would like to do for homogeneity test on daily rainfall data. therefore, i found that most of the researcher using this 4 homogeneity test theyre :- 1) Standard Normal Homogeneity Test, 2) BR test, 3) Pettite Test and 4)VoR test. However, i couldn't find how to compute those test as im using R software.
thus, can anybody help me regarding this test? i try most of the CRAN PAckage for snht but alwys had an error.
regards,
Deana 
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Homogeneity in data sets can be checked using graphical as well as statistical approaches. The most common graphical approach is the "Double Mass Curve" technique, which indicates the change in slope of data as break point from which the data exhibits inconsistency.
Secondly, the statistical tests such as Buishand test, Standard Normal Homogeneity test (SNHT), Pettit test, Mann Whitney Pettit (MWP) test, etc. can be used. You can refer the book "Hydrological Time Series Analysis: Theory and Practice" by Machiwal and Jha for details of these tests.
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Can anyone share me the publication "Planktonic dinoflagellates" (by Hallegraeff et al., 2010)?
Hallegraeff GM, Bolch CJS, Huisman JM, de Salas MF (2010) Planktonic
dinoflagellates. In: Hallegraeff et al, editors, Algae of Australia phytoplankton of
temperate coastal waters. CSIRO Publishing / ABRS. Melbourne. pp. 145–212.
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Thank you Dr. Króliczewski ! I will try.
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I am conducting an outdoor pond experiment with fish. We are trying to replicate submerged aquatic vegetation from the wild, but have had no luck so far. Last year we used plastic ivy which was not that great. I know there are a lot of pond experimenters out there... Any suggestions?
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We use black bin bags cut into strips and tied in a bundle. Fast to make, standard size and shape, easy to transport, submerge, inspect and retrieve. This is great for Triturus salamanders to lay eggs (on folded leaves)
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I found that there are contrasting opinions in the correct application of the equation of state for freshwater proposed by Chen and Millero, 1986.
Should the in situ or the potential temperature be used?
Chen, C-T. A., and F.J. Millero, 1986, Precise thermodynamic properties of natural waters covering only limnological range, Limnology and Oceanography 31(3):657-662
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I agree that this is not made clear in the Chen and Millero (1986) paper as they refer simply to "temperature".
My understanding is that Equation 1 allows you to compute the in situ density of a water parcel, RhoP as a function of its in situ temperature (t), salinity (S) and pressure (P).
Should you wish to compute the potential density, RhoTheta, which is the density this water parcel would have if it were raised adiabatically to the sea surface, then you need to plug in the potential temperature, Theta, into the One Atmosphere Equation of State given in Equation 2: RhoTheta = RhoP(Theta, S)
Theta itself can be calculated from t, S and P using a potential temperature calculator freely available online.
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Tardigrada and Bdelloidea research in México is very limited, so I would like to identify researchers or grups on these topics to make a network. I work mainly on systematics of Tardigrada and Bdelloidea groups. 
Thanks for your answers
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I work with bdelloids. I would be glad to try to help you.
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I will be increasing T by 2C every few days and need a heater that can do this accurately for a few gallons of seawater
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Tubular Immersion heaters are best option. It can be designed to based on Tank dimensions n with a suitable control System ( Panel). We make such heaters.
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I am trying to investigate if the choice of molting sites for waterbirds are influenced by the amounts of sulphur that is obtained by food items that the birds eat. Sulphur is a important component in feather production in birds
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You can use CARBON-SULPHUR analyser to determine TC,TS,IC,IS,OC,OS
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I am going to be testing fish under certain dissolved zinc concentrations and I need way to check zinc levels multiple times a day and get immediate results. 
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Depending on organics colorimetric and iron selective electrodes may have issues over time and AA or ICP-MS cost/time and portability issues.
If assays are required quickly, in very low ppb range, even for salt or brackish waters, consider Atomic Striping Voltammetry (ASV) with medial cost much lower. It may be necessary to strip organics with a UV cell or denaturing, but results can be had within minutes. Test, assays generally 30sec. Units such as the PDV6000+ square wave formats, totally portable with battery operation yet reliable and comparable to AA/ICP for a range of metals. Furthermore ASV has wide applications, including portability for biological samples.
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What will be effects of Feed spacers in parameters? i have read about it but any details about it, and what is standard No of Feed spacers in Sea water membranes, used by manufactures? 
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See: Impact of feed spacer and membrane modification by hydrophilic, bactericidal and biocidal coating on biofouling control, Desalination 295 (2012) 1–10.
I hope this helps!
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item required in the setting up of RECIRCULATING AQUACULTURE SYSTEMS ?
38556 / liter water capacity tank.
how many area required for the filter part in 38556/liter 
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You can calculate required volume of biofiliter using daily feed amount. For instance, 1 cubic meter of moving bed filter can filter the waste of about 14 kg of feed. This amount is about 3.5 kg feed for trickling filters, 15 kg feed for bead filters and can reach up to 28 kg feed for combined trickling and bead filters.
With best.
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Organisms are collected by trawl net from sandy-mud substrate. First of all I would like to thank to everyone who send the answer ant try to help me. Than for one who asked: samples were collected from south Adriatic Sea (Montenegro) at depth from 80-100 m. I put more photo about size and dissection.  
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Having seen the new image of the dissected specimen, I reiterate my original opinion that this is probably the anemone Actinauge richardii, or if not, a closely related species. The retracted tentacles are visible and the mass of sediment 'inside' the animal is not actually inside but the pedal disc forms a concavity that is filled with sediment such that the animal becomes firmly embedded. The degree of rugosity of the body depends in part on the state of contraction of the animal. See also: http://www.marinespecies.org/photogallery.php?album=4487&pic=1774
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Large scale project casue dimensional impacts on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. How and where it caused impacts especially terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna. What methods would be useful to identified those impacts quantitatively?
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Australian research can help you in this regard if you get success to find a proper link.
regards
ijaz
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People living in Jaffna are facing a grave threat in accessing clean drinking water due to groundwater pollution caused by oil leakage. In recent days, oil waste is clearly observed in drinking-water sources (wells etc) in Chunnagam and Valigamam areas. Wells are the prime and mostly the sole source of water in Jaffna and this contamination is severely affecting the livelihood in those areas.
This issue has resulted in scarcity for clean drinking water for the people living in the areas. No satisfactory action has been taken yet by authorities. Hence, there is an imminent need to create awareness of the issue to a wider audience in order to accelerate the phase at which actions are taken to solve the issue.
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Dear Sir.
Конечно, это правильная мера. В проекте на бурение  после цементации затрубного пространства верхней колоны труб целесообразно предусмотреть проверку герметичности.
Угрозу второму водоносному горизонту представляют скважины, которые бурятся стихийно населением с использованием примитивных средств, когда не предусматривается изоляция верхнего горизонта (одна труба). С этим можно бороться только широким распространением информации о зря потраченных средствах на такие скважины. 
Good luck
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