Science topic

Applied Linguistics - Science topic

Applied linguistics is an interdisciplinary field of study that identifies, investigates, and offers solutions to language-related real-life problems.
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if there is space in your team contact me. muhammadjahangeer2@gmail.com
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i am working on the role of mindfulness and resilience in online environment. If you do not mind, you can join me.
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What will be impact of technology in popularity of Western Music Notation for musicology and music composition? Since invention of phonograph transcribing songs and music for the purpose of preservation became useless because simply we can record it to avoid a song to be forgotten. Today development of technology provide a huge possibility of analyzing a piece of music. Most of young composers benefit from a great verity of sound processors and music software in their music compositions. Does it mean that western music notation is going to be less required in future of musicology and composition?
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I agree. developments are happening.
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Hi everyone! I'm writing for my masters dissertation in Education and I got a question about the findings from cross-case analysis. Must each section (I have 3 sections there) correspond to each research question (I have 3 RQs)? Currently, all the sections I wrote only answer RQ2 & 3 (Section 1 > RQ2; Section 2 > RQ2&3; Section 3 > RQ3) as these are the more crucial RQs. Is this good practice? Thank you!
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Your manuscript should be organized around answering your research question. For each question, you should have a process to collect data and analyze it. Your Methods section and your Findings section should both be organized by research question. For example: "The answer research question 1, about _____, the researcher used ________."
I do not think the manuscript should describe collecting and analyzing data that does not answer one (or more) of your research questions.
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Dear fellow researchers,
Do you know of any linguistics or applied linguistics journals that accept research letters, short reports, technical notes or similar, in addition to the standard research article? I know these types of article are used in STEM but I am not sure if they are at all widespread in linguistics or applied linguistics. I would be most grateful to anyone who could tell me which journals in the stated field accept these formats and how much prestige they (the formats) currently enjoy.
Thank you,
Chris Turner
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Applied linguistics journals that accept research manuscripts and short research notes or reports include the following (in alphabetical order):
  • Applied Linguistics
  • Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
  • English for Specific Purposes
  • Journal of Language, Identity, and Education
  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development
  • Multilingua
  • Studies in Second Language Acquisition
You could go through the attached guide, referenced below, for more insights.
Editors of TESOL Quarterly. (2017). how to get published in a TESOL or applied linguistics serial publication. TESOL International Association: Information for authors. https://www.tesol.org/docs/default-source/books/how-to-get-published-in-a-tesol-or-applied-linguistics-serial-publication-2017.pdf?sfvrsn=686ee5dc_0
Good luck,
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I'm going to work on my PhD dissertation. I'm going to work on ADHD and OCPD and their impact on learning English. I would prefer to work on adults learners particularly Iranian EFL Learners. my professor asked me to relate this topic to class management (to make it more practical). I would appreciate if you could give me any comments /advice.
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The language problem in ADHD could be expressed in any age, in different intensity levels, that could bring negative effects in all daily activities and learning process, which depends on the right language acquisition during the child’s development. Among the most common comorbidities in ADHD, the abnormalities in language result in greater unsatisfactory evolution and many problems in verbal and nonverbal abilities, and even more in academic life, as a result of losses in reading and writing appropriation.
People who have some kind of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) can in certain circumstance train themselves away from that behavior. In so doing they actually alter the metabolism of the OCD circuit in the brain. I remember as a child that my father could wiggle his ears and I could not. However, by spending a lot of time willing my ears to move, they eventually did. Reattribute by recognizing the need to develop new brain circuitry, taking advantage of the fact that the brain is known to be plastic throughout one’s adult life. Until the circuitry develops it is pointless to be disappointed at mistakes or less than perfect pronunciation or communication in the new language.
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Could you kindly share some free open access scopus indexed journals Q3 and Q4 , please?
Research areas: Applied linguistics, psychology, and language issues
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Hello, feel free to try Slovo a slovesnost: http://sas.ujc.cas.cz/?lang=en. It is even indexed in WoS.
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Should one analyze only one field's abstracts or combine more than one? If combining/comparing is better, which is the most appropriate field to compare with Linguistics/Applied Linguistics?
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It depends on the goals of your study and the research questions. In other words, what are you trying to accomplish with your study? Answering that question will tell you what data sources you need.
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Hello All,
I have a theory paper on the teaching of pronunciation to EFL/ESL/L2 contexts. I have received positive feedback on the paper itself, but am having a hard time finding it a home because everyone prefers to publish empirical papers. Does anyone know of any relevant calls for theory (it's a critical socioecological frame) and/or best journals? Thoughts?
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It seems to me that seeking to publish theory in an applied linguistics outlet is like trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. When the theory becomes viable, you may apply it and publish your findings in applied linguistics journals. I suggest for theory journals such as Journal of Linguistics, Theoretical Linguistics, Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, etc. Good luck with your theory.
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Case study in applied linguistics/ Language teaching
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I am having the same problem with my research design at the moment. I don't have enough participants for an experiment design and my data will be mainly qualitative, so I am looking into doing a case study. But I also have an intervention whose effectiveness I want to test and varify. So I guess it would be a case study with intervention then.
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Dear all,
Can anyone point to a theoretical reference / article discussing course notes (what students write down) as data in applied linguistics research?
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A theoretical article, in general, comprises or alludes to new or established abstract concepts relating to a certain field of knowledge. These articles are peer-reviewed, however, they do not often include research or experimental data.
These articles might help, have a look:
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Could you tell me, please if shaping reflective culture(value-cogitative potential) of a student through analytical reading is a branch of applied linguistics.
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“I am a writer of books in retrospect. I talk in order to understand; I teach in order to learn”
― Robert Frost
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Hello everyone,
I am adopting and adapting a survey which have 5 scales (commitment control, emotion control, ect) to measure self-regulation of language learning (a certain skill), the aim of the survey as I mentioned to measure the high and low self-regulation capacity among participants.
How can I use the questionnaire to generate more interesting findings? other than just the low and high self-regulation? can you inspire me with some creative ideas?
I was thinking to see gender differences among groups, and to add a part about socio-economic status.
Please inspire me with new ideas without having to make major changes to the survey. Let me know also the name of the tests required for the specific idea.
Thank you.
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Dear Samaher, your research would need to start from the research question(s) that you want to answer - and not from the research instruments you are using. The instrument itself is only a way to gather data that can help you to answer your question(s). So the simplest idea to help you would be to turn your research back on its feet: Start with want you want to find out about (which usually derives from what is already know/not yet known in your area of research) - and only then pick the scales that are appropriate to measure the student characteristics that you are interested in.
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Proverbs are commonly used in communicating important and deep meanings, especially in Africa. Can we really describe as a theoretical category in communication?  
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A Proverb is more worth than thousands of words. A proverb is like "A picture is worth a thousand words".
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I`m doing my masters on applied linguistics for spanish as a foreign language and the topic I chose for my research is about the use of humor in social media, specifically the use of imemes, as a way to bring students from different cultural background together in a multicultural class.
So I`m currently looking for some information about the origins of imemes
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Re i-memes and Social Media, check out this PowerPoint about Humor and Journalism where we show that Western Tall Tales became Urban Legends, which became Q-Anon Conspiracy Theories. We also discuss humor in the news and humor in fake news.
International Society for Humor Studies: http://www.humorstudies.org/ .
Alleen and Don Nilsen’s The Language of Humor (Cambridge University Press, 2019) is now available. We have developed a PowerPoint to accompany each of the twenty-five chapters of the book as follows:
Chapter 1: Introduction & Humor Theories Chapter 2: Humor in Anthropology & Ethnic Studies Chapter 3: Humor in Art Chapter 4: Humor in Business Chapter 5: Humor in Computer Science Chapter 6: Humor in Education Chapter 7: Humor in Gender Studies Chapter 8a: Humor in Geography I (International Humor: Books, Conferences and Organizations) Chapter 8b: Humor in Geography II (International Humor: Examples and Discussion) Chapter 9: Humor in Gerontology Chapter 10: Humor in History Chapter 11: Humor in Journalism Chapter 12: Humor in Law Chapter 13: Humor in Linguistics Chapter 14: Humor in Literature Chapter 15: Humor in Medicine and Health Chapter 16: Humor in Music Chapter 17: Humor in Names and Naming Chapter 18: Humor in the Performing Arts Chapter 19: Humor in Philosophy Chapter 20: Humor in Physical Education Chapter 21: Humor in Politics Chapter 22: Humor in Psychology Chapter 23: Humor in Religion Chapter 24: Humor in Rhetoric and Composition Chapter 25: Humor in Sociology We’re sending you a PowerPoint indicating how humor is important to your particular discipline. Please let us know if you would like to receive any of our other humor-related PowerPoints (see above). Thanks. Don and Alleen Nilsen don.nilsen@asu.edu alleen.nilsen@asu.edu .
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Hello,
What is the difference between pilot study/ phase? preliminary study/ feasibility study?
What they call the type of piloting that aims to test the instrument (e.g. survey, interview)? and what is the name of the type of piloting that is considered a smaller version of the main (PhD) thesis?
In the confirmation viva what type of piloting new PGRs usually use in their first year?
My major is Applied Linguistics.
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Hi Dr Samaher Saud . There are two types :
(1) smaller versions of studies, called feasibility studies, and
(2) “the pre-testing or 'trying out' of a particular research instrument”
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To simplify -- different verbs require different number of nouns to be complete. Some of arguments may be implicit in the real usage of language. So, my question is there any database containing many verbs (around 1000 verbs) with their argument structure. Or alternatively, a list of papers where argument structure is analyzed for specific verbs.
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There are several (it would be nice to have an organised list of these databases, or point toward some list if it already exists):
-FrameNet (for English and Spanish, and perhaps other languages that I'm not aware of): https://framenet.icsi.berkeley.edu/fndrupal/about
-SemLink: This one merges several other databases:
In Spanish there are other:
-AnCora: http://clic.ub.edu/corpus/es/ancora (also for catalán)
-SenSem: http://grial.uab.es/ (once available, now apparently broken) (also catalán).
Also, regarding your question, it would be useful to become familiar with the linguistic framework that guided the construction of these databases, whether they include arguments and adjuncts, etc. Some of them are available to download, others aren't.
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Can anyone shed some lights on the extent to which he has shifted his position on problematising practices from postmodernist approach?
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Yes it going to leave a huge impact after understanding of competing views in language education
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Holding a PhD in applied linguistics in countries like Belgium, where French and Dutch is a formal language, is not easy to guarantee a position in English linguistics. Looking for fellowship opportunities through universities' websites and others is very limited. I would like to know the best way to build research career if someone has the experience.
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You could look for a postdoc opportunity on Linguist List. Here is an example.
LINGUIST List. (2021, June 3). LINGUIST List 32.1926. https://linguistlist.org/issues/32.1926/
Good luck,
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The first thing which comes to mind in online examinations is the possibility of cheating. Instructors often use different ways like setting up the exam to show only one question at the time and limiting the allotted time for each question. Changing the sequence of the questions might be a good solution too especially if students of the same class are planning to get help from each other. But these suggestions are strongly context-specific.
So, I really want you to share your valuable experience.
Thanks indeed.
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using reliable software for exam
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The final qualification assessment for major programs is a strict regimen that involves different stages - oral and written exams, final project viva, internal and external review.
How are ICT tools used to translate real-life qualification assessment practices into the online qualification assessment process in a blended format? Especially due to COVID-19 quarantine measures?
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Thank you for sharing the paper, Dr. Yuliya Shtaltovna
I will read it as I promised as soon as have some time available.
Best Regards.
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I have a research and i should analyze the types of code-switching. however, i can't use Poplack's theory because my instructor said that it is too old. Any suggestions of new theories?
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Garcia or Cangarajah's concepts of translanguaging might help you.
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Prof. Emerita Sue Ellen Wright from Kent State University has posted on LinkedIn a message in which she reports the death of Prof. Juan Carlos Sager.
What a sad coincidence it is that I am currently lecturing a course on Terminology at the University of Antioquia in Colombia and some excerpts of his well-known "Practical Course in Terminology Processing" were part of the discussion of the last session.
I wish I could have had the opportunity to meet him in person.
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Sincere condolences to his family members, friends, and colleagues.
May his soul rest in peace.
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It is my first time in doing thesis and I'm confused regarding topic selection. Please give me suggestions in sociolinguistic field.
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Hi Laiba,
SL is a vast and interesting field! One project I did was about politeness. we compared an observation of interactions at a small grocery store to questionnaire results for another set of subjects with scenarios that were witnessed in the observation. We found that the differences in what people say that they do and what people actually do are differentiated along categories like, culture, gender, and socioeconomic strata.
Basically you should ask yourself . . .
"What differences in the way people speak interest me?"
then ask
"How can I study that?"
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What program is best for the computer-assisted phonetic comparison of dialects? We would like to compare several phonetically quite close dialects of a more or less well-documented language (with the respective protoforms available in case they're required for comparison). The aim of the comparison is to see how close the dialects are to each other and if maybe one stands out against the others, as well as to possibly get input for solving the questions of how the language and / or its speakers spread across the area where the dialects are currently spoken (within the possibilities, of course).
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Praat could be practically useful for doing various tasks of phonetic analysis by computer.
More info:
Good luck,
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We attempt to make a research to explore prosodic features of verbal irony read by Chinese EFL learners. We want to figure out:
1. the prosodic features of verbal irony read by Chinese learners;
2. the difference of prosodic features in verbal irony read by Chinese learners and native speakers;
3. whether context (high and low) influence the reading of verbal irony. 
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(LLS= Language Learning Strategies).
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One of the goals of the scientific platforms, including Research Gate, is to help researchers to update their knowledge regarding the recent developments in research in their area of study. We can help new researchers by suggesting titles or topics for research and in this way we can promote spreading knowledge and it would be another way for connecting researchers all over the world. Moreover, some researchers may co-author some topics as well as brainstorm ideas in their areas. I'll start with some topics that might be interesting for some researchers in the field of "translation" and I expect others to contribute. Thanks a lot in advance for your contribution. And I think you will get lots of thanks from such researchers.
1.Metonymy as a pragmatic style for politeness in religious texts with reference to translation.
2. Naturalness in translation: advantages and disadvantages.
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Definitely we should help each other
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I need to cross check several words that appear in subtitles of a movie with what is spoken out in a movie - a word in English or Hindi. A list of words in time order is provided. Is there anyone who would have a capacity to help?
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Hi, I am from India, doing research on subtitles (AVT) in foreign language like Chinese, English. If you have done any research on same, may share with me also.
Thank you! @Agata Bednarek
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If I’m looking at language variation, and expecting a gender difference between ‘style’ and ‘content’, and how does that interact with different meanings of a specific terms used by male or female? i.e. one would be more content-ful than the other?
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Jinan F. B. Al-Hajaj Thank you so much! :)
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I have been studying Zen in general and Koans in particular for a while. And it's applications in BUSINESS
The formulation of these Koans at first glance seems absurd and an austere waste of time, at least to me at first, but I suddenly started to see the logic behind it.
My troubles at the moment are;
1) How would I generate such Koans where my aim would be to seek answers that satisfy two divergent goals, tasks, concepts etc...
And second
2) if I somehow manage to generate such thing, how would I present it to my audience?
A statement, a question, a puzzle, a riddle anything else?....
The above is the object of my next publication and I it seems my brain is too small to handle it, therefore I am asking your help to generate some Koans for the business world
Many thanks in advance
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Can you give me more clarification on this subject
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I am trying to find some websites that list "call for book chapters" in applied linguistics or relevant areas (linguistics, language education, etc.). Can anyone give some suggestions? Thanks.
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The LinguistList Mailing list has these all the time.
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I am a sociolinguist/applied linguist whose part of research focuses on heritage language education. I would like to know details on GCSE/A levels in community languages (number of those who sit those exams, grades and pass rates, which languages, how many boards, chronological changes etc.). Where do I find data on GCSE/A levels in community languages?
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Assuming you're referring to the UK context, I'd think that this kind of data may be kept private in the Department of Education. Perhaps it's worth trying to check with the National Resource Centre for Supplementary Education https://www.supplementaryeducation.org.uk/
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I would like to compare two lists of collocations and find out the collocations they share and the ones they do not.
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Hi guys!
I have a question on a framing effect-like issue. Well, everyone of us has the immediate feeling that there's a huge difference between saying - for instance - "you should respect the environment" and "we should respect the environment", or also "the environment should be respected".
The difference might lie in how such sentences are interpreted by our minds and of course it affects the compliance to the described behavior (i.e., "respect the environment").
I'm convinced that I'm no genius and there must be a huge literature behind such an effect; but I'm not skilled in these themes, so I'm calling for help. Any clues?
P.S.: I know that nudge units and behavioral interventions teams in general promote the "make it personal" magic recipe to increase compliance, but I wonder where such strategies come from. I'm particularly interested in understanding the differences between "you should /we should", that is how grammatical phrasing (i.e., switching the person in the phrase) affects the interpretation and the relative compliance.
thanks in advance for any help
all the best,
Alessandro
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(1) You should do X / (2) we should do X / (3) X should be done — note that this is about deontic utterances, which are performative. They have no truth value but have variable speech act force. That FORCE stems from the authority that backs up the speaker in context. In (1), the back up is, basically: "...because I say so!" = personal authority. In (2), there is a collective morality behind the speaker. And in (3), there is an appeal to rationality, so the speaker speaks in the name of what he thinks is best according to impersonal logics and knowledge.
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If someone has PhD in TESOL from USA and he returned to iraq , can TESOL be equated with applied linguistics ?
Thank you in advance.
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DearReza Biria
Thank you very much foy your informative answer.
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This is so far the procedure I was trying upon and then I couldn't fix it
As per my understanding here some definitions:
- lexical frequencies, that is, the frequencies with which correspondences occur in a dictionary or, as here, in a word list;
- lexical frequency is the frequency with which the correspondence occurs when you count all and only the correspondences in a dictionary.
- text frequencies, that is, the frequencies with which correspondences occur in a large corpus.
- text frequency is the frequency with which a correspondence occurs when you count all the correspondences in a large set of pieces of continuous prose ...;
You will see that lexical frequency produces much lower counts than text frequency because in lexical frequency each correspondence is counted only once per word in which it occurs, whereas text frequency counts each correspondence multiple times, depending on how often the words in which it appears to occur.
When referring to the frequency of occurrence, two different frequencies are used: type and token. Type frequency counts a word once.
So I understand that probably lexical frequencies deal with types counting the words once and text frequencies deal with tokens counting the words multiple times in a corpus, therefore for the last, we need to take into account the word frequency in which those phonemes and graphemes occur.
So far I managed phoneme frequencies as it follows
Phoneme frequencies:
Lexical frequency is: (single count of a phoneme per word/total number of counted phonemes in the word list)*100= Lexical Frequency % of a specific phoneme in the word list.
Text frequency is similar but then I fail when trying to add the frequencies of the words in the word list: (all counts of a phoneme per word/total number of counted phonemes in the word list)*100 vs (sum of the word frequencies of the targeted words that contain the phoneme/total sum of all the frequencies of all the words in the list)= Text Frequency % of a specific phoneme in the word list.
PLEASE HELP ME TO FIND A FORMULA ON HOW TO CALCULATE THE LEXICAL FREQUENCY AND THE TEXT FREQUENCY of phonemes and graphemes.
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Hola,
Para el cálculo de la frecuencia léxica de unidades simples o complejas, se suele utilizar WordSmith o AntCon.
Saludos
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This is so far the procedure I was trying upon and then I couldn't fix it
As per my understanding:
- lexical frequencies, that is, the frequencies with which correspondences occur in a dictionary or, as here, in a word list;
- lexical frequency is the frequency with which the correspondence occurs when you count all and only the correspondences in a dictionary.
- text frequencies, that is, the frequencies with which correspondences occur in a large corpus.
- text frequency is the frequency with which a correspondence occurs when you count all the correspondences in a large set of pieces of continuous prose ...;
You will see that lexical frequency produces much lower counts than text frequency because in lexical frequency each correspondence is counted only once per word in which it occurs, whereas text frequency counts each correspondence multiple times, depending on how often the words in which it appears to occur.
When referring to the frequency of occurrence, two different frequencies are used: type and token. Type frequency counts a word once.
So I understand that probably lexical frequencies deal with types counting the words once and text frequencies deal with tokens counting the words multiple times in a corpus, therefore for the last, we need to take into account the word frequency in which those phonemes and graphemes occur.
So far I managed phoneme frequencies as it follows
Phoneme frequencies:
Lexical frequency is: (single count of a phoneme per word/total number of counted phonemes in the word list)*100= Lexical Frequency % of a specific phoneme in the word list.
Text frequency is similar but then I fail when trying to add the frequencies of the words in the word list: (all counts of a phoneme per word/total number of counted phonemes in the word list)*100 vs (sum of the word frequencies of the targeted words that contain the phoneme/total sum of all the frequencies of all the words in the list)= Text Frequency % of a specific phoneme in the word list.
PLEASE HELP ME TO FIND A FORMULA ON HOW TO CALCULATE THE LEXICAL FREQUENCY AND THE TEXT FREQUENCY of phonemes and graphemes.
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It will help if you use a suitable and powerful qualitative research software as Atlas.ti (https://atlasti.com/) or equivalent. This software allows you to introduce and research large amounts of text, written or oral, images, videos, etc. Then, you can select diverse research techniques, including frequencies, correlations, modulations, structures, and several other tools.
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actually I need semantic relations to agent nominals as well.
fx. I need the verb 'grave' (eng: (to) dig) which have semantic relations to 'jord' (eng: dirt) and 'skovl' (eng: showel) and of course alot of other obvious relations.
I need the verbs in order to test how organizational resources (knowledge, money, stuff which is all nominals) can be combined with verbs into tasks fx "grav i jorden med skovlen" (eng: dig into the dirt with the showel)
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I would suggest using Standford CoreNLP to annotate your texts (corpus) with POS tags, and I believe this computational package can have different scripts for different languages. Then, extract the words with verb tags. Let me know if there is any question.
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Is there such thing as false interpretation in Literature?
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An interpretation is considered admissible if it's not in contradiction with the text, but since the text is open and polysemous, the return to the text is often insufficient to determine the validity of the interpretations, which are diverses and can be contradictory. Literary interpretation is both subjective and in part conditioned by interpretative communities (Fish). We cannot use a criterion of truth (true / false) but an intersubjective validation process (admissible / contestable), in other words to be admissible an interpretation must be recognized as such by other readers. We must then turn to the explanation by the readers of the sources of their interpretations. In my educational research, I have shown that teachers refer more to literary culture and students to the values ​​shared in their communities as well as to their personal experiences of the world. Thank you for the rich discussion!
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The public question is to all experts of linguists, applied linguists and sociolinguists. This helps to figure out the impact of society in language and the impact of language in society.
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I would say that there is a great influence of the Society on the language and its behavior. Taking into account terms such as: "linguistic attitude" or "linguistic identity". The first refers to the responses that as individuals or a community we make to the use of the language of a certain individual or social group, these can be: rejection, acceptance, prestige, pride. It also has a great influence on the adoption, use or study of a language. so that, if a language has prestige, the more likely it is to be reproduced or spoken; Quite the opposite happens with languages ​​that do not enjoy that prestige, due to disuse, they are gradually forgotten until they become extinct. On the other hand, linguistic identity is the link we have with a speaking community. Duzak (2002) indicates that we do not develop a single linguistic identity, but rather that according to situations and contexts we adapt a multiplicity of identities.
However, taking into account aspects such as the use of language in a community, and its impact on the modification and acceptance of certain rules regarding speech, we find phenomena such as the insertion of terms that we could consider incorrect in the Dictionary of the Real Language Academy.
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Many L2 vocabulary items tend to be easier to learn. Other items, however, tend to be more difficult. What factors do you think might make L2 vocabulary items easier or more difficult to learn? Thanks in advance for any thoughts you could share!
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Follow.
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I am looking for research articles on photo-elicitation related to language education or linguistics.
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Annelies Kusters and Maartje De Meulder, The use of language portraits in the study of multilingual and multimodal repertoires, https://bib.irb.hr/datoteka/1009214.visual_verbal_abstracts_final.pdf
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Part 3 of Autonomous Language Learning with Technology: Beyond the Classroom (Advances in Digital Language Learning and Teaching), Chun Lai, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017
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I am looking for analysis of questions using semantic primes and NSM theory.
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The Mercator Institute for Literacy and Language Education at the University of Cologne, Germany, is conducting a systematic review on the effectiveness of language integrated strategies (e.g. scaffolding, Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP)) in classrooms. In this review, it is intended to collate, critically appraise and synthesize existing research evidence according to pre-defined criteria.
To complement our electronic database search, we are looking for manuscripts/working papers/project reports/dissertations (except for BA-/MA-thesis) that have not (yet) been published or submitted for publication (and are not (yet) indexed in databases).
We are interested in (quasi-)experimental and observational studies using a control group design that (statistically) examine
  • the effectiveness of concepts of instruction that integrate language support and subject teaching
  • for children of primary or secondary school age.
If you have carried out this type of study or if first results of an ongoing study are available, we would like to kindly request the document. Submitted studies will be reviewed by the project team; studies that match the review inclusion criteria will be included in the final review synthesis (i.e. summarized and discussed). Publication of the results is planned for 2021.
Of course, your submissions will only be used within the scope of the review and will not be passed to third parties.
Please send documents by September 30th, 2019 to Leonie Twente at leonie.twente@mercator.uni-koeln.de. If you have any questions, please contact Till Woerfel at till.woerfel@mercator.uni-koeln.de. Alternatively you can use the comment field below.
Thank you for your support!
Kind regards,
Till Woerfel, Martha Höfler, Annika Witte, Anastasia Knaus, Rebekka Wanka and Leonie Twente
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Dear Research Colleagues,
Are you familiar with studies on language acquisition in early simultaneous trilingual children that show whether there are any delays in their language development? I am familiar with several studies on early simultaneous bilinguals indicating that such speakers are not significantly delayed in language acquisition. I wonder if trilinguals differ from mono- and bilinguals in how fast they acquire their languages.
I will appreciate your feedback.
Thank you.
Pleasant regards,
Monika
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We'll be doing language tests with bilingual children: forced choice tasks, sentence repetition & grammaticality judgment. We'll be measuring reaction times too. I don't have experience with programming. Which software do you recommend to set up the experiment, and why? Also, links to helpful resources to learn to use the software will be much appreciated.
Thank you!!
Raina
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Based on personal experience, I need suggestions for an international journal to publish my paper. I need a journal that is responsive, has a good impact factor and has a print version.
Thank you.
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Hello,
These new journals have fast workflow, but they are not yet indexed in Scopus or ISI.
1. Middle East Journal of Applied Linguistics (MEJAL)
2. Middle East Journal of English Language and Literature (MEJELL).
Hope it helps
Regards,
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Perception of TBLT is significant because perception changes the attitude and readiness to use something. But how to measue the perception of TBLT among high school English teacher.
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Microsoft Word doesn't have the bibliography styles for linguistics journals like Corpora, SAGE and the De Gruyter Mouton journals, so I created my own.
Latest first-ever-in-the-world addition:
  1. APA 7th Edition (Alpha version for English MS Office)
  2. Language, Context and Text : The Social Semiotics Forum
  3. Corpora
  4. De Gruyter Mouton journals
  5. SAGE Harvard for SAGE journals
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Boshra A Arnout
, you are welcome. Do report bugs to me if you find any.
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Are there any relevant features that make some prepositional combinations relatively easier to learn than others?
Thank you in advance for your participation!
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A growing number of studies, including Mkhelif’s which is to come, have recently provided evidence indicative of an important role of frequency in the acquisition of EFL vocabulary items.
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Hi, 
Would like to know if it is common/necessary to translate the qualitative interviews collected in different languages into the language in which the dissertation is written? My Ph.D. dissertation is in English and narrative interviews that I collected for this research project are in German, English, Russian and Azerbaijani. Since I will be graduating from a German University, I guess, there is no need to translate the interview transcripts in the German language, and, naturally those in English, either, because this is the original language of the dissertation. But what to do with the interview transcriptions in Azerbaijani and Russian? Should those be translated into English, too? 
Has anyone had such experience? Grateful for any tips! 
Many thanks!
Aysel 
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I just finished my dissertation in which a few interviews were in foreign language. This is what I did, and it worked like a charm.
1. Code all interviews in their original language - without translation. In this, you will not loose the meaning.
2. Translate only those parts of the foreign-language-interviews, what you would like to it as quotes. This is so much easier.
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What factors do you think might contribute to making L2 collocations easier or more difficult to learn?
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Relevant corpora can be made use of, but is that enough?
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“Emoción en la interacción digital: de los recursos lingüísticos a los emojis, memes y stickers”
Pedido de contribuciones
Envío de las propuestas: hasta el 15 de julio de 2019
Notificación de contribuciones aceptadas: 31 de octubre de 2019
La Revista de Estudios del Discurso Digital (REDD) invita a investigadores que trabajen en lengua española a enviar manuscritos para su segundo número, cuyo tema central es “Emoción en la interacción digital: de los recursos lingüísticos a los emojis, memes y stickers”. El objetivo de este número especial es atender a diferentes recursos y estrategias que los usuarios emplean para canalizar la expresividad en las interacciones digitales (escritas y orales). Desde los primeros recursos textuales que se emplearon (abreviaciones, mayúsculas y minúsculas alternadas y otras estrategias de escritura creativa) a los diferentes recursos multimodales que las interfaces ofrecieron, los usuarios han desarrollado un repertorio de estrategias pragmáticas para canalizar sus intenciones comunicativas.
En este número se priorizarán los trabajos de alta calidad que describan y analicen algunas de las siguientes temáticas en relación a una o más plataformas (redes sociales, correo electrónico, etc.) y/o tipos textuales (textos breves, chats, post/comentarios, mensajería instantánea, etc.):
1. Evolución diacrónica de los recursos expresivos.
2. Usos y funciones de emojis, memes, stickers, videos, etc. en la interacción digital.
3. Recursos expresivos en la interacción digital oral (videos, videollamadas, audios).
Los artículos podrán ser tanto reflexiones teóricas como análisis empírico de un conjunto de datos. En el caso de que utilicen corpus, estos deberán ser recolectados bajo protocolos éticos que salvaguarden la identidad de los interlocutores. Por otro lado, y dado que el principal interés de REDD es la lengua española, se valorarán los artículos que atiendan a la riqueza y variación inter e intralingüística del español empleado en las interacciones digitales. Asimismo, se invita a todos los interesados publicar en la revista a enviar propuestas para el segundo número de contenido general. El plazo de recepción de aportaciones para REDD se encuentra abierto durante todo el año.
Indicaciones para enviar manuscritos
Los manuscritos deberán ser enviados por vía electrónica mediante el Portal de Revistas UVa (Universidad de Valladolid, España), en la siguiente dirección: https://revistas.uva.es/index.php/redd.
Los artículos tendrán una extensión máxima de 15.000 palabras (incluyendo tablas, gráficos, ilustraciones y bibliografía) y respetar las normas editoriales de la revista. Se deberá enviar maquetado en la plantilla de REDD. Todos los textos que cumplan estos requisitos serán revisados por pares ciegos. La decisión de publicación será comunicada a los autores en un plazo máximo de tres meses.
Para informaciones adicionales, enviar un correo electrónico a revista.discurso.digital@uva.es
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Violeta Cautin-Epifani te envío por privado! :)
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Dear Colleagues and friends
Actually, I have done such a thing in applied linguistics, and I need to justify my research. More precisely, after interviewing some expert teachers, a questionnaire was developed and administered to a large number of teachers. My main concern is with the construct validity of the questionnaire. I haven't done much to exactly evaluate the construct validity of the questionnaire, but it was extracted from the interview. Now, is there any citation or reference to strengthen the logic of my research?
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It's always a good idea to have a very clear justification for your research design and methods before collecting data, but now that you've already done it, you might look to a textbook on mixed methods to reflect on your rationale for the approach you've taken (e.g. see Creswell and Plano Clark, 2017).
Similarly, it would have been a good idea to consider construct validity to some extent before actually administering the questionnaire (e.g. face validity, at least), but perhaps you can go back to the construct(s) you were trying to measure and look more explicitly at whether and how your items measure all aspects of that/those construct(s)?
The lesson learned here, really, is not to jump ahead too quickly to data collection, and to make sure you have your justifications for design and methods fully fleshed-out before proceeding.
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For instance, how should a language teacher teach different speech acts, implicit meaning, etc.
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Notably, the pragmatic aspects of language use can be actualized by the anguage contexts. To this end, problem solving tasks fostering critical thinking and collaborative work such as discourse completion , role play, and consciousness raising activities engaging the learners in group work can make a difference.
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Our language is the origin and the building mean of formal languages of math and physics. Artificial intelligence mashines creates even their own language.
Are there research to create new languages to create new science or to simplify and make more understandable the current science? Or is it just my fantasy? Maybe if a man can see, say in ifrared range then he could invent new words? Maybe we should go in this direction?
How will one create new language describing our world and qualitatively different from the today one? Maybe we should study other creatures likes delphines?
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Yes, we can make science more clear and powerful with new language, but we can't neglect English because English currently plainly settled as the principle language of universal logical correspondence, specialists keep on distributing their work in different dialects than English too.We encourage mainstream researchers to attempt to handle this issue and propose potential methodologies both for incorporating non-English scientific knowledge viably and for upgrading the multilingualism of new and existing information accessible just in English for the clients of such learning.
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  1. Which journals in applied linguistics have short turnaround times?
  2. How long was your longest wait from the first draft submission till the first substantial response from the editor / reviewers?
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I am still waiting to hear from IAFOR.
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Fellow researchers,
I'm on a lookout for any research into the priming potential of morphemes. Say, -ism which can (potntially) activate semantic frames of medicalisation? Any hint at studies along these lines would be much appreciated!
It does not need to specifically talk about derivational morphemes, the example above is just to illustrate what I'm after.
Thanks again!
Łukasz
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Since morphemes such as '-ism', 'un-', 'bi-' stand for semantic concepts, albeit somewhat ambiguously, e.g. 'un-' can mean 'not', or 'reverse (an action)', you should look at Laurence Urdang's two books Prefixes and Other Word-Initial Elements of English and Suffixes and Other Word-Final Elements of English. Both were published by the Gale Research Company, the latter in 1983 and the former in 1984. Both are out of print but secondhand copies are available from ABE Books Secondhand, or possibly from your university library.
Prefixes lists 2860 elements, Suffixes, 1545.
In addition, you could examine C.K. Ogden's 1930 Basic English (Cambridge: The Orthological Institute) which provides a core vocabulary of 850 words. These words overlap to a degree with the 200 concepts listed by Morris Swadesh (1950 and 1971) and Cliff Goddard's Natural Semantic Metalanguage (Google Cliff Goddard or NSM).
Since many artificial languages e.g. Esperanto, Eh May Gee Chah (by Hankes) and Nobel (by Randic) start with a core vocabulary and elements which can modify that vocabulary, it would be worth researching these, too.
For further information, e-mail: I.C.Maun@exeter.ac.uk
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  • Based on the model presented by Goh and Burns in "Teaching Speaking: A Holistic Approach" (Page 53), it seems that we have two sides of a bridge in terms of second language speaking competence. One of them is knowledge, and the other one is the skill. The "knowledge" phase puts the emphasis on teaching the components related to the knowledge of a language such as grammatical points, vocabulary, idioms, etc. Based on my interpretations of the first four chapters of the book, it seems that teaching the "knowledge" of a language is not going to result in competent second language learners in terms of their speaking competence. In fact, it seems that beginning the process of language teaching from the "knowledge" side is not going to reach to the other side of the bridge that is the skill.
  • If we investigate the other side of the bridge, the skill has some key features. A skill is unconscious, automatic, etc. Based on the mentioned model, moving from the bottom of the triangle to the top (from the skill to knowledge) might have better results in the sense of speaking competence. In fact, adding the needed knowledge to the already-gained skill might let the learners have access to the knowledge in a blink of an eye for negotiation of meaning while the needed knowledge without the presence of the needed skill might not be accessible for the negotiation of meaning. Metaphorically speaking, having a glass prior to pouring water in, is more logical than having water with no glass.
  • Having the mentioned points in mind, some language teachers limit the teaching a language to its knowledge. Now there are several questions to be asked:
  • 1. How can teachers move from skill to knowledge in practice?
  • 2. Do material designers consider such theoretical issues in designing coursebooks?
  • 3. Is there any relationship between the Interface hypothesis and the mentioned issues?
Reference
  1. Goh, C. C., & Burns, A. (2012). Teaching speaking: A holistic approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
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Sabri Thabit Saleh Ahmed Thanks for your participation in my discussion and your nice answer. In my opinion, the authors of the mentioned book intended to mention that teaching the knowledge of a language with the aim of reaching to the skill in the second step is not a successful path. Therefore, it seems that it might be better to change the initiation point to the skill side.
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Since Lakoff and Johnson's "Metaphors We Live By", Applied Linguists use Conceptual Metaphor Theory for different pedagogical purposes. While some researchers use a pure cognitive perspective in researching Metaphor, some others add Sociocutural perspective to the cognitive view. Therefore, the question is what are the weaknesses of the pure cognitive view that led to the emergence of Sociocutural perspective in Metaphor studies?
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For literature on the socio-cultural perspective in metaphor research, I recommend that you read the work by e.g. Kövecses, Musolff and Charteris-Black. They have different takes on the relation between the socio-cultural, discourse and the cognitive, but provide relevant perspectives on the subject.
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I have read studies in Applied Linguistics journals that have conducted numerous ANOVAs on the data, followed by a Bonferroni adjustment. A structural equation model would be appropriate if a latent variable was present (which may not always be the case), but why would a Path Analysis not be more appropriate?
Furthermore, this study (link below) has also got me thinking about multiplicity control within SEM itself. Why is this not common practice in education / Applied Linguistics literature?
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Sorry, but your exercise still being inductive. Please review the theory about SEM and regression, there are a lot written and evaluated... In this way it is just pseudoscience...
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Can anyone suggest me tools or a model to apply in doing a linguistic critical discourse analysis of newspapers?
Thank you very much indeed.
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Dear Jamal,
You have to have a good command of Systemic Functional Grammar by M. Halliday. The common denominator of Fairclough, van Dijk , Hodge and Kress and van Leeuwen is their employment of Systemic Functional Grammar. If you would like to focus on "who did what to whom, what is not said rather than what is said" concerning social power abuse, dominance and inequality, read Halliday.
Best,
N. Kansu-Yetkiner
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Dear Colleagues at RG,
As a college English instructor who has taught everything from literature to scientific writing, I was taught ways to read essays in order to grade them that were far from my own field.
Scientists often complain that in this time of increasing specialization they can no longer understand research reports from domains outside their own.
Do some colleagues have methods to share that allow use to understand essays or technical reports outside our own fields?
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Many thanks, Agnieszka Will geb. Gronek !
I hope grad students read this who are assigned large stacks of research essays outside their own areas.
Here are the three key parts in outline form (from my Ph.D. professor):
METHODS (note number of subjects in experiment and who is funding if noted in this or INTRO.) Who funded the study is most important when cnsidering possible biased findings or not.
DISCUSSION OF DATA AND EXPERIMENT (skim this unless needed for evaluating the text. May have difficult material such as advanced equations ans innumerbale names of chemical reactions, etc.)
CONCLUSION
The Intro, methods, and conclusion can re written in understandable langauge. If more is needed, get help from a person of that speciality.
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.Quranic schools are environments of Arabic grammar, which the learner learns.
المدارس القرآنية تعد بيئات للانغماس اللغوي في العربية، مما يساد المتعلم في تعلمها.
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أعتقد أن للتعليم القرآني عموما سواء أكان عبارة عن مدارس نظامية أم في صورة كتاتيب وزوايا وحلقات مسجدية ...إلخ دورا هاما في تعليم العربية وترسيخ ملكتها لدى منتسبي هذا النوع من التعليم، وذلك من خلال البيئة الاصطناعية من الانغماس في النص القرآني سماعا وتكرارا وتدبرا وحفظا ... مما يساعد على عملية الاكتساب للغة وإن لم تكن مقصودة عينا، وهو ما تؤكده النظرية السلوكية في تعليم وتعلّم اللغات، وغيرها من النظريات مثل نظرية تشوكمسكي العقلية ونظرية الفطرة والممارسة لعبد الدنان...إلخ
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It is said that language and culture are inseparable and learning language is void without achieving an awareness of its culture. Language is the carrier of culture and without culture languageis of nonsense. On the other hand, many communities consider learning a foreign culture as a kind of cultural invasion and prefer to expose their children to foreign language but not to its culture… What do you think we as EFL teachers should do in our classes? And should our teaching of English be culture-free or culture oriented??
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I teach English and language awareness i.e., not only one English but Englishes especially the varieties they speak and/or need to learn, so not necessarily British or American English but International English, the one spoken and understood by the nonnative speakers (EFL/ESL). World Englishes proponents & supporters respect all varieties.
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Good day! I need some topic suggestions for my Language and Linguistic Research class. Can you please help me with a researchable topic? I prefer applied, corpus, or sociolinguistics. Thank you!
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Applied linguistics includes teaching languages' the fist language & the second language', different kinds of written and spoken texts (corpus linguistics), style, sociolinguistics, compiling dictionaries, machine translation, language and brain 'neurolinguistics', language disorders.
Good luck
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I wonder if it is possible to combine applied linguistics and daily life issues in the classes for EFL learners. My goal is to make them interested in learning applied linguistics without following rigid order of classical applied linguistics textbooks.
Thanks.
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It is true . Language is life. And life is a theater . Because no person can live a normal life without it . But the most important point I think is that , how language items are used and in what situation they are appropriate .(use.+ usage)
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Is there a social justice problem behind the dominance of English in scientific writing? ... (and I'm writing this in English! how is that for irony?) I'm curious to get your input/experiences and also some references.
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We are creating the discussions and use English so it is a resource in a positive sense. Why English? Of course it is the matter of power but it's been historical process and no sense in condemning it now - we have to deal with it, and leave space for other languages including minor languages and in science too. There is an author writing on linguistic imperialism - Robert Philipson - he published a lot on that.
I personally think major languages representing major economies will be used in all processes during our way to Industry 4.0 and I assume within the Industry 4.0 era minor languages will be in the most vulnerable position and might not survive that era. However if they do survive and reach the next stage - Society 5.0 - they will have a chance as the technology will be supposed to serve human needs first, not businesses and languages as well as age and gender will stop being a tool for personal social and professional development - but that is the distant perspective and more of a hypothetical view
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I was asked to design a course description for MA Linguistics particularly Sociolinguistics and Stylistics.
Can anyone suggest some good books for these two courses ?
Thank you very much indeed!
Jamal Kaid
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The fields of linguistics are lot and you need to decide which one you are interested in. Then, google what you need.
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An author cited my paper and it appeared in Google Scholar and everywhere, but it was suddenly disappeared.
Do you know the logic behind citation disappearance?
Thank you very much indeed!
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Sometimes the journal itself disapear
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Hello again! Applied linguists seem divided as to whether permit their EFL/ESL students to speak in their L1 during discussion or talk English only. Do you enjoin your students to stick to English explanation only or you allow them to process and verbalize information in their MT? Thanks
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I believe using L1 in EFL/ESL classroom is beneficial. According to Lin (2008), the use of L1 in L2 classroom is helpful for:
  • Interpretation and clarification of subject;
  • Explain complex grammar points, phonology, cross-cultural issues, and spelling;
  • Explain complex ideas;
  • Evaluation of comprehension;
  • Management;
  • Save class time, as a substitute for a lengthy explanation in the target language;
  • Affirmation and stimulation of participation;
  • Pass on meaning through providing the L1 equivalence through translating L2 items or sentences;
  • Humour and sign of bilingual identity. Explanation of errors
Reference:
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I am working on a Bantu A90 language (considered by Guthrie to be Sub-Bantu). We have four past tense markers, and I am working through some very helpful tests from Seth Cable right now for determining their range of meaning. However, for the future tenses I am finding little work done. Can you recommend any articles I could read where the tests are described in detail regarding future tense semantics?
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I could imagine that there are some tests in Rebecca T. Cover's chapter "Semantic fieldwork on TAM" in "Methodologies in Semantic Fieldwork", edited by
M. Ryan Bochnak and Lisa Matthewson. Conceptually, the important thing is of course to make up one's mind on whether "all futures are modal" or not - in the latter case you will have to chose your test sentences very carefully, guaranteeing that informants are really sure that the main proposition does hold at some later time.
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Dear Sir/Mdm,
It gives me great pleasure to inform you that the Malaysian Association of Applied Linguistics International Conference (MAALIC) 2018 will be held at the Asia-Europe Institute, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on 3rd to 4thDecember 2018. The theme of the conference is Applied Linguistics and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): Language, Communication and the Professions. 
This conference provides an opportunity to explore how language and communication in a multiplicity of languages and settings is vital in achieving these universal sustainable development goals.It also aims to provide a platform for the sharing of ideas and to promote research collaboration between applied linguists and the working professionals.
Our two Keynote Speakers are: 
  • Prof. Tan Sri Dato Dzulkifli Abdul Razak, Rector, International Islamic University Malaysia and Senior Advisor, Asia-Europe Institute, University of Malaya 
  • Prof. Vijay Bhatia, Visiting Professor, Hellenic American University Athens (Greece) and Adjunct Professor, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Please find more information @ https://maal.org.my/maalic-2018/
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Dear sir, could you please do us a favor and distribute this to your friends and students?
Many thanks in advance.
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As many young doctors widely use the English root of the word in an Arabic style, to produce Arabian English, in this way they use the word (imdayed) in stead of saying he is dead, and thay said ( imsatble) in stead of saying he gots stable.
Could this developed as a new medical language in Arabian countries?
Do you have other examples of the words used by doctors in your countries?
your participations will be appreciated.
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A good observation respected Azzawi Hadi, as this phenomenon is already happening every where; who are non natives English speakers.
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I am looking for fast publishing ISI/ Scopus journals to publish some papers in. Your help is highly appreciated. Thanks in advance
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There are two reputed journals with fast publication process:
1- Applied Linguistics (Oxford journal, IF: 3.22)
2- International Journal of Applied Linguistics (Wiley Publications)
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Which techniques do you reccomend for quantitative term mapping? We are conducting a literature review to disambiguate a group of closely related technical words in education. Or aim is to provide a clear definition for each of them, as based on the mainstream use among researchers in the field. We were thinking on a quantitative analysis which helped us conducting kind of a cluster analysis of the most often alluded meanings under each term. Can you reccomend something?
Thanks!
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So the first step would be to 'lock down' the terms / lexicalizations. You can do a bit of explorative reading to get to them, of course. But you should not just build up the totality of the corpus as you go. That will skew tha data to some direction. Don't try to go wide by getting many terms. Try to get deep by getting a few terms in as much different contexts as you could possibly lay your hands on. Typically you'd want your corpus to reflect the balance of contexts in the actual discourse. But, often enough, insights are gained by the odd low-count contex . So do try to get them in, even if at an expense of balance.
Then, 'lock down' corpus size. Corpora grow to be virtual behemoths these days (up to millions and tens of millions tokens). If you'd like to retain the option to close-read when necessary you'd want to go on the low end -or design for sub-corpora. Sub-corpora are extra nice, because they can allow for keyness analyses (texts where your terms are key would be more likely to elaborate on them). So, get your size fixed and go reach it, without changing your mind about what should go in and what shouldn't midway. Ideally, you'd want to crowd-source that part; it both speeds up the procedure and keeps you impartial. Set up a Train-Test split (dedicate part of your data to derive your scheme from and part to test it on). You can also go for a cross-testing arrangment.
Perform standard collocation and collostructional analyses with your terms as KWICs and wide enough spans on both sides on your Train set. See if any interesting n-grams -including skip-grams- with discriminative power pop-up (n-grams mostly showing up with one but not the other term). Run collocation analyses on items in them too. If an n-gram strongly selects a term as collocate both ways and not another, well done, you've found a disambiguating feature. Add the feature to a lexicon. You'd want at least one disambiguating feature for every term touple. Once there's a scheme in place, evaluate it against the Test set. Observe where it hits and where it misses. Go back and refine as necessary.
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How is the notion of "linguistic distance" perceived/defined/employed/researched/tackled in current linguistics?
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This is a very broad question that deserves a really long answer, but very generally linguistic distance can either be defined in terms of phylogenetic distance / (un)relatedness or in terms of typological distance independent of phylogenetic distance. Whereas the former concerns how closely related a set of languages are, the latter involves similarities and differences in terms of typological traits, e.g. phonological, lexical, morphological and syntactic (dis)-similarities. These tro often go hand in hand but do not have to, due to e.g. contact effects between unrelated (but geographically closely) languages or by pure chance.
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I always read some online headlines in Arabic on an attractive issue and click the link and find no relation between the headline which comes to my mind and the news. They choose a headline to attract many readers and they do.
Let me give you an example to make the point clear.