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Antibacterials - Science topic

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The extraction was done by maceration method and kept at room temperature, but the antibacterial results were negative.
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I suppose you evaluate the activities before keeping the extract and after on the sample sample with the same reactants ! You also have to consider photo-chemical reactions, which can change the structures of some compounds.
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1. I need to immobilize microbes, how can I understand that hydroxyapatite chemical is antibacterial?
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Again, not sure what you re asking here, but growing biofilms on hydroxyapatite is easy. Commercial HA is not antibacterial (unless you use one that has antibiotic added). The interesting paper posted by Dr Geis also shows this clearly.
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Although the material I used in the first week of my study showed an antibacterial effect, it did not show an antibacterial effect when I repeated the experiment 3 weeks later.
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After the questions of Phil Geis I am still confused as to what the question is really asking. The questions need to be answered, but should begin with"
- Is the biofilm what is 'antibacterial' or something else brought into contact with the biofilm?
- If it is the biofilm, of course it will be different after growing longer and changing.
- If it is something else (non-living) that was antibacterial, and you used it again against a biofilm, yes there should be differences. The biofilm might have changed, become more 'defensive' after first contact. Or if the same agent was used, it might have residue from the first contact which renders it not as effective.
Kağan Veryer - Without more information, clear answers, a research protocol, or other information, it is impossible to give you an answer.
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In antibacterial sensitivity assay, can a lower concentrations of a tested compound give a larger zone of inhibition than the larger concentrations of that compound?
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Some cationic antimicrobials are less effective at high concentrations -> CMC. Don't know that this would be demonstrated in disc diffusion.
Suppose you might have precipitation at higher levels
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As we all know using Cu, Ag, Ti etc given antibacterial properties. Is there any special metal which can give better then the above
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Silver
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Hi,
We need co-author for performing bio-imaging ( live cell imaging, cyto-toxicity, antibacterial, anti fungal activity study) study. If anybody interested please inbox me.
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Greetings,
I am interested in joining the group
thanks
phone no: 009647707346115 watsapp
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Hello al
Please i want to manually prepare antibiotic disk for disk diffusion method for an antibacterial plus enzyme inhibitor ( as amoxiclave for example)
My question is that how disk can be prepared? First mix the fractions then put on the disk or individually?
Thanks in advance
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If the end application is antibacterial ,does the stabilizing agent used has any role to play?
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Stabilization requires a good affinity of the stabilizing molecules towards the metal oxide nanoparticles. Now depending on the functional group of the stabilizing molecules, for different metal oxides the stabilizing molecules vary. For example, we found that thiols bind strongly to ZnO and CuO but not to TiO2 and WO3. While amines bind strongly to TiO2 and WO3 but not ZnO and CuO. This work may be interesting to you:
In your case, both PVP and starch have oxygens to bind. I think they can bind to TiO2 for example. Amines, phosphonic acids or Thiols have stronger but more selective interactions.
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Silver nanoparticles are prepared commercially in solid form, but i want to make the solution for antibacterial properties through MIC 96 well plates
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If the nanoparticles will stay in suspension without mixing, or if they will stay in suspension with occasional mixing, then it may be possible. It is also necessary that the nanoparticle suspension is not so turbid that you can't tell whether the bacteria grew or not.
One way to achieve periodic plate mixing is to use a plate reader, such as a Spectramax, that has this function, as well as the ability to control the temperature. It can be programmed to agitate the plate at specified intervals. You would incubate the plate in the plate reader for the necessary amount of time at the desired temperature. You could also take absorbance measurements during the incubation at regular intervals.
You might also consider doing agar MICs, in which the nanoparticles are suspended in the agar at a different concentration in each of several plates.
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Our goal is to encapsulate Essential Oil nanoparticles with antibacterial properties to make the application on textiles (fibers).
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I would like to know how to interpretate the relationship between energy gap ∆E, calculated by DFT methods, and results of antibacteriel activity using disk diffusion methods of two compounds (comparative study)
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By the DFT analysis you can get the HOMO-LUMO gap value. Depending on the value you can have an idea about the reactivity of your compound. Then you can simultaneously do the molecular potential map analysis, which provides insight regarding the electrophilic and nucleophilic sites.
I hope this answer will be helpful.
With regards,
Chethan
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I have synthesized Selenium nanoparticles using a plant source. After drying them in Petri plates , these nanoparticles were scraped out. Because of that some of them are found as large thin sheets. It was found to be difficult to reduce their size and also they are not properly suspended in distilled water for antibacterial studies. Is there any solution for these?
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Instead of drying them on petri plates, you can try lyophilization or other minimally disruptive methods. Parvathi M a
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Mono- species biofilm such as E.faecalis
Dual - species biofilm such as E.faecalis & S.mutans
What is better for intracanal medicamments antibacterial experiment?
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Mono might give accuracy but it will be to an irrelevant endpoint. The author apparently is pursuing medication - a treatment option effective in application of biofilm composed of multiple species. @
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Although it is often said that plant- or mushroom-extracted compounds display their antibacterial activity through a dose-dependent manner, sometimes I observe that it is not practically always the case. Sometimes, an extract show potent antibacterial activity at lower doses, while it is ineffective at high doses. Any suggestion or postulation is welcome!
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protein extraction for antibacterial activity
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Hello Bita, Extraction is usually referred to a situation where the enzyme or protein is intracellular in nature (resides inside a cell) and require cell disruption. From the question, it is clear that the enzyme is secreted by fungi or it is extracellular in nature. Well you have to separate the mycellia or fungi by filtration using cheesecloth or muslin. The next step would be to determine activity in the filtrate and in case a purer preparation is needed, different protein purification strategies can be used. For example, ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography, SEC etc depending upon degree of purity required.
Hope this will help
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Which methods are best for determining the inhibition zone for bacteria? agar well diffusion method or disk diffusion methods.
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In my understanding, broth dilution is the best among the above-mentioned methods. It can provide a quantitative value of microbial susceptibility and ensure the proper mixing to microbes. But diluent for individual antimicrobial should be selected carefully that supports solubility well.
Disc diffusion and Etest have limitations on the diffusion capacity of antibiotics when their molecular sizes are large (eg. colistin).
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I have got following results can you please tell me my result are fine or not if not what I should do to improve my result. Moreover, I haven't seen inhibition zone in that experiment. 10-6 I have got 160 colony calculated as 0.062 is it correct calculation??
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Satwik Majumder Yes you are right. Because the above concentration(ng) has much variation to the last OD value. As well NC and PC also have error.
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There are so many antibacterial NPs available ranging from organic , inorganic to carbon and MXenes. I am planning to do an anti-biofilm study against oral polymicrobial biofilms. I am confused which nanoparticles should I choose from the available options.
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I am trying to get the antibacterial activity of the fruit bark extracts. Please if you have any suggestion, kindly drop it.
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Please read research articles.
Do not waste time in asking some useless questions like thus one. Ask only if you have any specific questions.
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I have performed antibacterial screening of new compounds (tried different combinations in different concentrations) against oral pathogens, and I got good activity against oral pathogens. Should I select these combinations with good antibacterial activity for my oral care gel formulation?
For Example.
compound A + compound B + compound C = 1ug/ml + 2ug/ml + 1ug/ml
The above combination gives a good antibacterial effect.
Can I consider this combination (with respective concentrations) for my oral care gel formulation?
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I have prepared the silver nanoparticles via chemical reduction method using NaBH4. Upon turning yellow color of the solution I stopped the reaction. I got UV vis peak of nanoparticle solution at 400 nm.
But when I centrifuged the solution the pellet is so small that unable to use it for antibacterial activity. I want to ask whether I can use the AgNPs solution for MIC by diluting it with D.W. or pellet is necessary?
Also which medium will be suitable for the growth curve? either nutrient broth or PBS?
I will be grateful for your help.
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Dear Researcher,
Use high concentrations of primary materials to have finally enough concentrations of Ag NPs and on the other hand, apply ultra-centrifuge for precipitation of Ag NPs.
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Antibacterial activity was performed against gram positive and gram negative bacteria using 0.05M HCl as control. in gram positive bacteria control has not shown any significant activity whereas it has shown slight activity against gram negative bacteria . Pls suggest me how can i Calculate the % of inhibition in this case
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It is not the usual practice to report % inhibition of growth of rapidly-growing bacteria. The usual practice is to report the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the substance. The reason for this is that it is usually easy to tell in a set of 2-fold serial dilutions of the inhibitor which was the lowest concentration that prevented growth.
In contrast, if you try to make a plot of growth (either by colony forming units or optical density) versus concentration, it will usually show a very steep transition from full growth to no growth within one or two dilutions, making it difficult to calculate the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) accurately.
So, since you have already measured the MIC, the measurement is complete.
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The problem of antibacterial resistance to frequently
used antibiotics has led to a search for newer and
alternative compounds for the treatment of drugresistant
infections[1]. Although pharmaceutical
companies have designed a number of new antibiotics
in the last three decades, resistance against these drugs
by microorganisms has also been observed. Drug
resistant bacterial infections are causing immense
mortality and morbidity worldwide. For example, in
2005, in the United States, 19 000 out of 95 000 patients
affected from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus
aureus (MRSA) have died. Number of death was
higher than number of deaths combined from HIV/
AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, emphysema, and homicides
combined[2]. As many branches of treatments like postsurgical
care, neonatal care, transplantation medicine,
cancer chemotherapy, and care of the critically ill
patients need effective antibiotic treatment, failure
of conventional antibiotic treatment to combat multidrug
resistant (MDR) pathogens, caused high rate
of mortality. With this background, World Health
Organization (WHO) identified MDR bacteria as one
of the top three high priority threats to human health.
Infectious Disease Society of America has addressed
the biomedical community to declare a war against the
MDR bacterial threat. Along with intensifying research
on understanding the resistance pattern of MDR
infection, they have stressed that the ultimate goal of
scientist would be to identify appropriate and efficient
antimicrobial drugs to the patients.
As for a long period of time, plants have been a
valuable source of natural products for maintaining
human health, certain plant extracts can be a cure
for infections caused by MDR. Along with different
herbs, seaweeds and higher plants, many workers have
suggested the usefulness of mangroves in traditional
medicines. Mangroves have been used as a source of
timber, food, fuel, fodder, medicines and fish poison in
tropical coastal zones. Recently scientists have found
evidence that mangroves have medicinal properties that
can cure many diseases like asthma, diabetes, cancer,
ulcer, wounds and AIDS.
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Dear Abhijit Mitra . See Kindly the following useful RG link:
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In a broth microdilution antibacterial test, In some cases, I can observe the wells containing the tested bacteria mixed with a high concentration of the extract turn red after using TTC-based pectrophotometry, meaning the extract did not have any antibacterial activity. But in order to be accurate, I am wondering whether there are bacteria which are inhibited by the extract (and cannot grow anymore in the culture media) but are still metabolically active and thus they can reduce TTC to form formazon. How can I detect these types of bacteria?
Flowcytometry can be more accurate in that it can detect dead and viable bacterial cells. can it be more useful?
Best regards
Hamid
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Hamid Pourianfar Have you solved this question? I have searched the same reason because I have tried another assay based in ATP in which my extracts showed inhibitory activity but with TTC everything turned red. So I would like to know if you have tested another 96well assay like MTT (I don't know if there will be difference), because I was thinking if the problem maybe is that TTC is a toxicity assay and not inhibitory that's why the false negative...
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I performed a blend of essential oils against pathogens, in which I have chosen random combinations starting from respective MIC. One of these essential oils didn't show any effect against pathogens. Can I combine it with other essential oils with MIC values?
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Thank you, Gamal Enan
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Dear sir
W-type Hexaferrite was written and published in chemical physics letters by me. In this article, I addressed the UV and antibacterial properties of Hexaferrite. However, due to band energy gab and antibacterial activity, I am unable to connect the two studies. That's why i'm asking this question. Thank you for interacting this question, Jamee M.Abduljalil and Roger Bayston.
Thank you very much.
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Hi R. Sagayaraj,
I think there is no direct relationship between band-gap and antibacterial properties. The important thing for antibacterial activity is the formation of ROS which is referred to the existence of the excited cations due to UV excitation. Moreover, the metallic NPs have the same behavior to produce ROS.
For that, there is no scientific meaning to suggest that the antibacterial activity depends on the band-gap energy of the material used.
Regards.
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Dear colleagues I have synthesized ZnO from Zn Plate using fiber laser using liquid laser ablation but it has shown no antibacterial activity
could anyone suggest how to solve such a problem?
Best Regards
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Dear Huda M.H many thanks for posting this very interesting technical question on RG. The antimicrobial activity of zinc oxide (ZnO) depends very much on the particle size. Antimicrobial activity is exhibited mainly by ZnO nanoparticles, whereas is is not pronounced when you have bulk ZnO material. For more information about this issue, please have a look at the following potentially useful review article:
Review on Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles: Antibacterial Activity and Toxicity Mechanism
Fortunately this review has been posted by the authors as public full text on RG so that you can freely download it as pdf file.
I hope this helps. Good luck with your work and best wishes, Frank Edelmann
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how to make the disc of a particular nanoparticle concentration for antibacterial disc diffusion assay
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Thank for this interested question
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I need CLSI guidelines for Riemerella anatipestifer infection in ducks.
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okay. thank you@@ Sweta Singh
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In this investigate; the synthesis of cerium doped manganese ferrite (Mn1-xCexFe2O4) nanoparticle was carried outfacile Co-precipitation method. XRD, FTIR, FE-SEM, EDAX, VSM, XPS, and Antibacterial activities studied for synthesized materials. XRD reveals the cube structure after successful incorporation of Ce3+ ions in the Mn-ferrite matrix. FTIR studies confirmed spinel system ferrite. VSM exhibits enhanced magnetization of Ce3+ by MnFe2O4. XPS confirmed the cerium ions in all the doped samples and identified the chemical state of the ions in the ferrite material. Materials observed significant antibacterial activity at high cerium concentrations in manganese ferrite nanoparticles.
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>"Silver nanoparticles are used to treat people from COVID at public events"
Sorry, it is an anecdotal example of using of silver nano-particles by some asian dictators. It proved economically beneficial to the organizers, But I never seen any double-blind study on that.
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How can we know the ROS production when we treat bacterial cells with an antibiotic agent?
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The generation of ROS was determined using fluorogenic dye 20, 70-
dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA). About 1 mL of culture suspensions from pathogens with
cell load of 1x108 CFU mL-1
was taken into various test tubes and 2.5 μL of DCFDA solution was added. All the reaction tubes were incubated in shaker under dark condition for
25 min at 37°C. Prepared antimicrobial substance (eg.Au NPs) was added to each test tube and again 2 h incubated in dark condition. The ROS formed in the sample after 2 h was
detected at 488/525 nm of fluorescence excitation/emission intensity measured using
Fluorescence Multi-Detection Reader.
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Disclaimer: I am not a microbiologist by profession or training and this is a curious/knowledge question
I have read some old articles that suggest the inoculum concentration to be 10^5 according to EUCAST.
I have also read some review articles suggesting 10^8 (0.5McFarland standard)- citing CLSI.
I am not able to download CLSI guidelines, can anyone help me get a copy to read about broth dilution and initial cell density actually prescribed?
Please let me know if these standards have changed? What cell concentration do researchers commonly use to read MIC (in North America or elsewhere)
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I am struggling with the antibacterial activity trend of my hot-water extract (obtained from a mushroom). It inhibits the tested bacteria at very low concentrations but significantly stimulates the growth of the bacteria at high concentrations. This trend is the same with any bacterial species being tested. Can anyone please help me understand why this might happen?
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Follow up
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E.coli shown 10.83% of growth inhibition% and s.aureus shown 11.23% at its lower concentration how to decide antibacterial quality .and in higher concentration (100)it is showing more inhibition.
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I fully agree and support the opinion of our distinguished colleague Faraed Salman on this issue. Thanks!
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What is the role of size and shape of nanoparticles in their antibacterial activity? What is the mechanism of antibacterial action of the nanoparticles? And how does it depend on the target organism?
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In many cases (e.g. with 'silver' nanoparticles) the dissolution rate of the surface oxide defines the bactericide properties. Obviously the smaller the particles then the quicker the dissolution because of the higher specific surface area. Also different crystal faces dissolve at different rates and this is shape dependent. For more view this webinar (registration required):
Silver colloids and invisible ink
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Hi.
We have some carbon nanoparticles and want to check antibacterial activity against drug-resistant bacteria. Before working on drug-tolerant bacteria, Are there any protocols or parameters for checking nanoparticles whether have the antibacterial capability on drug-resistant bacteria?.
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Follow
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Hello,
I have a problem. My recombinant producted LL-37 form only alfa helix (CD spec.) and doesnt have antibacterial activity. Synthetic peptid LL-37 form random-coil (i see on CD spec.) and have antibacterial activity. Have you encountered anyone with this problem? How I transform alfa-helix to random-coil?
Thank you for answer,
Mr. Antonin Pavelka
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You most likely are familiar with this paper:
It states and I quote: “At micromolar concentration in water, LL-37 exhibits a circular dichroism spectrum consistent with a disordered structure. The addition of 15 mm HCO3−, SO42−, or CF3CO2− causes the peptide to adopt a helical structure, with approximately equal efficiency, while 160 mm Cl− is less efficient.” And “A cooperative transition from disordered to helical structure is observed as the peptide concentration is increased, consistent with formation of an oligomer.”
In other words (as also done in this paper), preferably your peptide should be dissolved in pure water (since ions can cause conformation changes and change the extend of oligomer formation). To achieve this, you might try to freeze-dry your recombinant peptide and dissolve it in water.
Best regards.
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Hi everyone
I am starting work on antibacterial activity from insects. Any help in protocols of preparation of Whole body extracts will be highly appreciated.
Thanks
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I have performed the antibacterial tests under the presence of E.Coli and S.aurus bacteria. I did not observe any zone of inhibition.
I have gone through various literature some literature discussed the following statement.
"As material did not show antibacterial activity. Therefore this material is not toxic for useful bacteria and can be used for implant application.
However, other literature reveals
A zone of inhibition can be seen, which concludes the antibacterial activity of the material, and material can be used for implant applications.
Both statements are contradicting each other.
So I want to know that which statement is true?
Is implant material (Tibial component of Knee) need to perform the antibacterial activity?
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Some of your literature sounds very off base. What beneficial bacteria would one want associated with a tibial implant? Certainly one would want sterility.
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I want to evaluate the antibacterial activity of metal nanoparticles at different time intervals. I am performing this experiment in a flask and after the specified time take out the sample for UV-vis. I am using PBS as growth media for bacteria. At 6 h the OD declines. What could be the possible reason of this? Also what should be the appropriate volume of the media?
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PBS is not a good medium for the bacteria to grow. I would suggest using an appropriate growth medium for the type of bacteria you are using. Also, the no drug control should show growth which would indicate the medium you are using for the bacteria is right.
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Should the final gel needs visible or UV light to stimulate the TiO2 nanoparticles to work as antibacterial?
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Dear Ishray,
Most effective is the TiO2 polymorph anatas, which has an optical band gap of 3.5 eV. Thus you need UV-A radiation or higher energy.
Please have a look to the attached slide taken from one of my lectures.
All the best for your research!
Thomas
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I'm intending to test the antibacterial activity of 2 medicinal plants from Comoros using disc diffusion assay. I wanted to used DMSO as negative control, however I've been told that it has some drawback and I should look for alternative. So what can I use instead of it?
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As a control, you should use the same solvent/buffer as that in which the samples to be tested are dissolved
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I have prepared hydrogels , I want to determine antibacterial activity. Should I use them In gel form ? or I have also in solid dried powder form. What is the way of sample preparation form them ?
For plant extracts polymers and other I normally use 10mg/ml to 40mg/ml. The gels swell in water and DMSO.
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Dear Yasir Iqbal, I suppose it is not a Virgin hydrogel, but loaded with an antibacterial agent, silver based for example. Please check the following documents. My Regards
10.1002/advs.201700527
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The extraction of plant extracts exhibit pharmacological properties such as antibacterial, anticancer, antidiabetic, etc and the researchers use NMR, HPLC, GC-MS, and other testing methods to identify and purify the bioactive components that are responsible for this activity.
I'm curious about the rationale behind the synthesis of nanoparticles, such as silver or gold, using plants that have proven pharmacological properties.
I look forward to your explanation. Thanks.
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i want fast publish free or low cost Scopus journal dealing with food antibacterial preservation
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Scopus journals needs time because it is academic process .
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We have active antibacterial compounds and they are highly lipophilic. So we are using 10% kolliphor and 10% DMSO to solubilize them in micelles. When we test this formulation for MIC we don't see any activity. We have tried shaking the plates at 250rpm while incubating the mic plates and adding tween20 up to 30% to disrupt the micelles but have not been successful.
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Instead of using plates, try a broth MIC measurement. The dilution of the formulation may allow the compound to dissociate from the formulation. Of course, it may precipitate when it dissociates.
Only the free compound will have an antibacterial effect.
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What is the best as chemicals what have antibacterial activity (like silver) for air treatment by tio2 photocatalyist to eliminate different types of bacteria and other air pollutants?
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Also, kindly check the following link entitled (Self-Cleaning Coatings and Surfaces of Modern Building Materials for the Removal of Some Air Pollutants):
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Please share the paper also ya. Thanks.
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During screening of microbial extracts for antibacterial activity I keep seeing an unusual effect on the growth of P. aeruginosa (PA), which I hope you can see in the images attached. Basically I am doing disk diffusion assays, so plates are inoculated with bacterial solution matching 0.5 McFarland standard. Whenever I do this with PA I see what looks like viral plaques. I have tried preparing the inoculum using both the overnight growth and direct suspension methods, but still see the same effect. The same thing happens with two different strains of PA, and on two types of media (MHA and BHA). Interestingly, the technician in the lab has tried to replicate this several times without success.
Also, there seems to be a strange effect where there is a halo of these plaque looking things around some of the disks, yet the bacteria are growing within the zone.
If anyone has come across this before, or has any idea, I would love to hear from you!
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antibacterial and antifungal activity Comparison between carboxymethylchitosan and quaternized chitosan
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Quaternization of chitosan's nitrogen atom is the most common way to make water-soluble chitosan derivatives, particularly at physiological pH. Recent studies have shown that chitosan derivatives with a permanent positive charge on nitrogen atoms side-bonded to the polymer backbone have excellent antimicrobial activity. Kindly check the following RG link:
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I did the hemolytic test, The result showing after 24 hours indicated that the bacteria have gamma-hemolytic (non-hemolytic), but I kept the plate in the incubator for 48 hours, then the clear halo zone showed around the colony (Beta-hemolytic). So which result should I use? I read some papers and normally they did incubation for around 16 -24 hours.
Another found was that 75-90% of my isolates from the fish gut have Alpha or Beta hemolytic. and almost 100% of my isolates with antibacterial activity are hemolytic strains. So I would like to ask two more questions:
1. Is hemolytic really a necessary safety test for probiotic due to many bacteria with hemolytic is available in the environment and we still can scope with them?
2. hemolytic activity and antibacterial activity are in correlated or not?
Thank you very much for your suggestion and comments!
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If Your bacteria is showing zone on the plates in between the incubation of 24 hours then there is no need to provide the more incubation.
Thank you
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for antibacterial activity, can we use other than standard isolates (as ATCC strains) for the purpose of knowing the effectiveness of certain herbs or any tested drug?
regards
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In my opinion, it is better to use ATCC because it is a strain, but it is possible to use such isolates if they are diagnosed microscopically, biochemically, serological and confirmed via molecular tests (PCR) ... If they pass those tests and they are positive, we can use them because here they were not diagnosed as presumptive spp. only but they confirmed by PCR, so they confirmed at the species level and here we can consider them as strains.
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I am working on depositing Polyaniline on titanium through electropolymerization using cyclic voltammeter for antibacterial effect. I found a couple of articles showing that they achieved antibacterial behavior by coating surfaces with Polyaniline. However, I am not able to achieve those results. I am able to form a film of Polyaniline (I assume that it is emaraldine because it is green in color) but my bacterial studies showed no antibacterial effect of the Polyaniline. Any ideas why or what should I do differently?
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Thank you Mehrdad
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I am checking the antibacterial effect of synthesized molecules which is soluble in HFIP. Is there any effect of HFIP on bacterial growth.
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DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2012.04.010
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is the so-called "sharp edge" a microscopic or macroscopic term? Any assembly or composite of molecules may form a "sharp edge". The real edge of GO is full of dangling bonds, functional groups, and structural defects. The reactivity is high at the edge. Of course, bacteria won't survive long enough. But the probability for a bacteria to stick on edge is relatively lower than on other sites/surfaces of the GO composites. The edge contribution may not be as significant as the authors have claimed. SBF induced HA appears to be "sharper" than any other components in the composites
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They are membrane stress induced by the nanosheets warping, cell membrane damage caused by direct contact with sharp edges of the nanosheets, and the oxidative stress generated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. You can check the paper below for more information
Regards,
K
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I have some plant samples and I want to check the antiviral activity and Antibacterial Activity. and I want to check it by using bioinformatics.
So I need Suggestions regarding which bioinformatics parameter or software is available that I can use for check by antiviral and Antibacterial activity.
#bioinformatics #antiviral #antibacterial #plants
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Hi
Your request is very general.
You need to have information about the compounds of the plants you want and find the antiviral or antimicrobial effects of those compounds.
For example, plant AMPs. Some of these AMPs are shared among eukaryotes (eg, defensins and cyclotides), others are plant specific (eg, snakins), while some are specific to certain plant families (such as heveins). You can use https://dbaasp.org website to predict the antimicrobial properties of peptides. This site is also a database of AMPs where you can see the antimicrobial properties of the AMP you are looking for.
Or other compounds in plants that have either been approved for antiviral and antimicrobial properties, or you can use docking tools to predict the interaction of these compounds with microbes or viruses(For example, a flavonoid compound with the corona virus s protein).
good luck
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If we find synergism between two antibacterial drugs (phytochemical allicin + commercial antibiotics) in vitro then will it work in in vivo situation? What interfering factors might cause problems? What can be done to mitigate those challanges? Please provide some suitable literatures also.
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Synergy in vivo depends on the pharmacokinetics of each antibiotic, and their efficacy at the site of infection,
It also depends on the presence of a similarity link between the type of strain and the type of antibiotic used
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Plant extract, activity, antibacterial, antifungal, enzyme inhibition
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I have prepared zein/laponite coacervates of size ranges between 500-600 nm and I want to use it for further as a drug delivery carrier for antibacterial and in cancer cells. So can I use that much of size for these purpose? please help.
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500-600 nm is on the same size scale as a bacterium, such as E. coli. The coacervate could possibly be antibacterial for some reason, but it is not going to be able to pass through the membrane, except by breaking the cell open. It is possible for particles of that size to be taken up into eukaryotic cells by phagocytosis.
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I performed the antibacterial activity of isolated herbal extract against Rhodococcus equi and used Erythromycin as a standard drug, ZOI of the plant extracts were 16-20mm and Erythromycin was 28 mm, are these herbal extracts are effective or not.
What is the criteria to consider any agent to consider as good/bad antibacterial.
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I need to prepare a stock of 10 mg / ml erythromycin to check the mic value. I am trying to dissolve 0.1g/10 ml of water but i can't dissolve erythromycin in water.
How can i prepare 10 mg/ml stock solution? Do i need to use a solvent that does not have an antibacterial effect other than water?
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I am working on a project for assessing the Antibacterial activity of various chemicals, I was wondering Can i make solution of those components using water as a solvent, depending on the fact that they can form hydrogen bond together which would make them together more likely soluble?
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Dear Youssef Abdelaziz your original question has been asked about six weeks ago. In the meantime, did you give it a try? It would e interesting to learn what you found out.
The following two articles could also be helpful i this respect:
The latter article is freely available as full text in the general internet.
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I am doing research to test antibacterial activity using plant leaves that I have mashed. How many ratio I should add between the simplicia and water to get 100% concentration in infusion technique?
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Rawaa Aswad .-. What is 'D' and '.w' ? If this is water, wouldn't this dilute the solution, so it could not be even close to 100%. Salim Hussein Hassan .-. if she wants a concentration of 100% how could it depend on a different concentration? I am confused by your answer.
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I am currently working on cytotoxicity of bacterial extract, the extract is already known to have a antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus from previous research. I am willing to know if both of those test (antibacterial and cytotoxicity) has any correlation ?
the extract itself only has Saponin as the secondary metabolite with simple phytochemical test.
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The goal of antibiotic discovery is to find a substance that kills bacteria but not human cells at therapeutic concentrations. It is easy to find compounds that kill both (such as antiseptics), not so easy to find compounds that only kill bacteria. They generally work by a specific mechanism, such as inhibiting a biochemical pathway present in bacteria but not present, or substantially different, in human cells. Saponins are detergents. They dissolve membrane lipids, which does not distinguish between human and bacterial cells.
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For a first screening of antibiotic properties in a given substance, which bacterial strains (risk group 1) would you test to get a first general indication on whether the substance has a broad antibiotic spectrum?
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If you want to compare the antibacterial activity of your substances to well-known antibiotic drugs, it might be a good idea to use the reference strains that are recommended for the drugs. See the EUCAST protocols for each drug to learn which reference strains are used.
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I want to determine the antibacterial activity of Zinc Oxide nanoparticles by the disc diffusion method. In order to impregnate the disc with the appropriate concentration of ZnO, it has to be diluted (not dissolved) homogeneously. I have used methanol, DCM, and DMSO. I also used sonication and vortex shaking for the homogenization. Nevertheless, the ZnO did not show any antibacterial activity. Can anyone provide me a detailed SOP or procedure and suggest me a suitable solvent? Thanks in advance.
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hello, here is the introduction of the Bacillus sp. i have been studying on:
1.it's Bacillus strain YB123 (haven't been identification).
2.it shows large inhibition zone with many phytobacterium.
3.it doesn't have any effect on plant immunity.
In so many literatures about antibacterial compounds from Bacillus spp., such as iturin, fengycin, surfactin,
they said that the supernatant was work on plate assay, and shows visible inhibition zone,
but i really can't understand why the supernatant of YB123 doesn't show any about that?
Are there any literature of antibacterial compound mentioned the compounds only secreted while the bacteria was present?
THANKS FOR YOUR HELP!!
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You have to first analyze the supernatant and if you find no antimicrobial compound(s) there then you will find the answer to your question.
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I want to check antibacterial activity of CaCO3 nanoparticles, and I have to make suspension in which they can easily disperse. I have tried DMSO, chloroform, ethanol, saline and DI water, but unable to do so.
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Calcium carbonate is a mineral (rock). It is not going to dissolve in aqueous or organic solvents. If you dissolve it in acid, it will cease to be calcium carbonate. The best you could do would be to grind it into a very fine powder and make a dispersion in water, which will eventually settle out.
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If you have a technical question about antimicrobial research, there is a resource called REVIVE.
"REVIVE is working with leading experts in the field of antimicrobial R&D who are committed to support scientists from across the world in advancing their research. With this interface we want to help you to get in touch with these experts and to give you the opportunity to discuss your research questions with them."
REVIVE is a project of The Global Antibiotic Research & Development Partnership (GARDP). From the above paper:
"The Global Antibiotic Research & Development Partnership (GARDP; https://www.gardp.org) is a not-for-profit research and development (R&D) organization that addresses global public health needs by developing and delivering new or improved antibiotic treatments, while endeavouring to ensure that access to them is sustainable. Initiated by the WHO and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), GARDP is an important element of the WHO’s Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance, which calls for new public–private partnerships to encourage research and development of new antimicrobial agents and diagnostics."
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Thank you for sharing such a nice information !
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Hey my dear freinds,
I wonder how to modify the known antibacterial peptides’ amino acids composition to make them more easily bond to both gram- positive and negative bacteria, which kinds of aa replaced could enhance this ability ?
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Hi,
Generally you will want your peptides to possess an amphipathic tertirary structure. You will want to have a large number of hydrophobic amino acids, and a number of positively charged residues.
Avoid negatively charged residues. A number of prediction services exist for prediction of anitimicrobial peptide activity, you can use those to evaluate your substitutions.
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Dear all,
I am looking for publications dealing with the long-term stability of antibacterial coatings. I need to know if the coating still works even after months or years. The latest term I found was 56 days which is not sufficient long for my research.
Thank you in advance.
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Dear Dr. Pavel Mareš,
antimicrobial coatings are able to prevent germ growth for many applications in applications well beyond healthcare. These are durable coatings that can continue to perform even through regular, repeated water exposure and cleaning.
Using silver ions as a permanent material component prevents strong germ growth between cleaning cycles and guarantees low bacterial attack for many years. Successfully fighting germ growth consists of three action mechanisms: 1) blockage of primary cell metabolism; 2) stoppage of cellular respiration; and 3) prevention of cell division. These three mechanisms prevent the growth of undesired microorganisms on surfaces. The substance combination is activated by moisture and develops its antimicrobial effect. This means the surface is kept clean.
For more details, please see the source:
How Do Antimicrobial Coatings Work? by Crest Coating Inc.
Best regards, Pierluigi Traverso.
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please suggest me the method to determine the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles with full of procedure or refer me any research paper.
thanks and best regards
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It depends in what the nanoparticles are incorporated (suspension, or in a material?) but the killing effect depends on either silver ions or, if small enough, direct incorporation of nanoparticles into the bacteria. Generally speaking, they do not diffuse through agar like antibiotics so a disc diffusion method would not be suitable. If in an aqueous suspension, you could use a simple doubling dilution method, but the method of test needs to be linked to the intended application: are you intending them to work in suspension, or when incorporated into a (bio)material?
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I have a polymer which have antibacterial effect, I need a full, clear procedure to do in order to test the polymer effect into bacterial (E.coli and staphyloccucs aureos)?
Note: The polymer has already fabricated.
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Dear Islam Al-Shurman,
I have attached some books about polymers with antimicrobial activity. i hope they would be useful.
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What is the best method to fix the extract of herbs onto cotton fabrics to impart them durable antibacterial properties, color and aroma?
It is known that fixation at high temperature for such substances may lead to lose of their characteristics. Also use of some chemicals is also not favorable.
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Dear Dr manal
It's been known that the microencapsulation method is the favorable to impart herbs or oil essentials into fabrics to obtain bodycare or cosmotic textiles or even antibacterial one.
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We want to study the antimicrobial potential of medicinal plant extracts. Kindly suggest the precautions for antibacterial and antifungal activities.
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Dear Dr.Vinesh Kumar,
We studied the antifungal activity of some plant extracts in vitro against the known standard strains of fungi. However, we did not perform in vivo experiment.
You first try to get the standard strains of bacteria and fungi to conduct in vito assay of plant extract. If the results are encouraging, you can go for in vivo studies on laboratory animals after obtaining ethical clearance from the authority.
Wishing you good luck in your mission.
Prof.Dr.Mahendra Pal
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what i observed in lab is that cellulose nanofibers are not antibacterial against s. aureus
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this is not possible for cellulose as a bulk or nano form to exhibit antimicrobial activity, As, it act as a nutrient for the bacteria itself. thats why we have to functionalize the cellulose substrate to get its antibacterial properties.
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types of antibacterial and anti fungal can you gives ?
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Dear dr.
Beta-lactam and cephalosporins
thanks
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Hello,
I am curious, do someone has the experiences with the the bacterial colonies aggregation (on the pictures), especially of B. subitlis, nearly behind or on the edge of inhibition (or rather no-growing) zone within Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion tests? And can I consider this phenomenon as the proof of the antibacterial activity of extracts 3, 4 and 5 or it has some other explanation, e.g. just some weak intolerance/sensitivity of bacterial strain for the metabolites followed by the transfer of highly mobile cells of B. subtilis to "non-toxic" zone? Thank you very much for each prospective reaction.
Hint for the pic.:
bacterial lawn - Bacillus subtilis culture inoculated from the liquid media Tryptic Soy Broth containing endospores of B. subtilis
samples on discs - 1,3,4,5,6 - different extracts of secondary metabolites from Streptomyces (after Ethyl acetate extraction, dissolved in methanol), 2 - Ethyl acetate control
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Thank you very much Dr. Pattnaik.