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Anthropology of Religion - Science topic

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We always tend to show that there is a link between the archaeological discoveries and ancient religious facts, especially in countries such as Egypt, Israel and other parts of the world.
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Religious stories are nothing but symbols of real historical facts... Archaeological investigations revealed some of them...
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Hello team, sounds like a great project. Just wanted to touch base with you about a co-operative project I may have coming up on the Hawkesbury - involving Aboriginal names and archaeological sites. I'll be back in touch if we get the funding! best wishes Grace
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Still waiting for the kick off of the project. kindly update us
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The European Academy of Religion announces its fourth Annual Conference, which will take place in Münster (Germany) between Monday, August 30th and Thursday, September 2nd. Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster will be the organizing institution.
Due to the cancellation of #EuARe2020, it will be possible to re-submit for the next annual conference those panels that were already accepted in 2020 and were listed in the conference program - This is our case!
Proponents will find a dedicated submission form that will be open from Friday, December 4th to Wednesday, December 23rd. Re-submitted panels will be automatically included in the conference program.
Further to the re-submission, proponents will be able to make adjustments to the general setting of their sessions. Changes to the panel duration are possible, but not guaranteed.
PANEL: Religious experiences of contemporary pilgrims The panel aims to discuss relations between cultural and religious heritage and the religious experiences of modern pilgrims. Who is a modern “real” pilgrim? How the religious heritage is perceived and experienced during its journey? How the religious heritage is interpreted in literary and visual representations? The panel is mainly focused on networks called European Cultural Route i.e. Santiago de Compostela Pilgrim Routes (1987); Via Francigena (1994); Saint Martin of Tours Route (2005), Cluniac Sites in Europe (2005), European Route of Cistercian abbeys (2010), European Cemeteries Route (2010), Route of Saint Olav Ways (2010), Huguenot and Waldensian trail (2013), Routes of Reformation (2019) but it accepts papers on other local examples and non-European studies and perspectives.
The deadline for paper submission is Friday, MARCH, 19th, 2021 (23.59, GMT +1) Contact: pabloplichta@gmail.com
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I am very interested in this topic. I am a mental health nurse in the UK and have also walked the Camino on a number of occasions. A close friend of mine who is also a nurse supported a fellow Pilgrim on the Camino Way who then had to be admitted to a psychiatric ward - with unusual beliefs of a religious nature. The narrative which psychiatry adds to such experience seems to have a pivotal role in recovery. Often there is a total rejection of personal narrative - and in so doing - missing connection and understanding. I look forward to hearing others views. Rebecca - Bradford Early Intervention in Psychosis Team
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WAC2020 SESSION 18 – CALL FOR PAPERS
THEME: F. IDENTITIES AND ONTOLOGIES
15. Archaeologies of Identity
Organisers: Gail Higginbottom, Cecilia Dal Zovo, Felipe Criado-Boado
Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit)
Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Direction (CSIC)
**Feel free to download our flyer and share (click on title)**
Invitation
We invite you to participate in our session. This session wishes to address approaches and interpretations that determine in what ways megaliths & earthworks first became phenomena in particular regions and/or why they didn´t. Connected to this is whether or not people saw themselves as affiliated groups. Indeed, we also want to know why some regions chose one of these phenomenon and not the other within the same temporal span, or gave one precedence over the other. The building of megalithic monuments is a worldwide, time-transcending phenomenon, hundreds of thousands were erected across the World, with some places like the Korean Peninsula holding about 30,000 dolmens. The fact that they still exist in situ, highlights their past and continued relevance in the Cultural Landscape today; it also highlights their on-going collective identities. A similar story is attached to earthworks like mounds, ditches, embankments and pathways and their combinations. Megaliths & earthworks are clearly a dominant form for creating a materiality of social & spiritual engagement across the World. Is it possible that similar material practices mean shared worlds in some regions, and how might we differentiate between this and co-vergent evolution? As these monuments continued to develop through time, it is possible that so too did their meaning(s). Or is this rationale only an assumption, and indeed rather misguided? With such deliberations, this session, then, also wishes to see evidence that might answer this for us, too, or indeed provide evidence for the stability of a cultural practices, meaning and identity through time. Perhaps there is macro and micro evidence that displays stability but the micro reveals the forms of change within local communities. We are seeking works that present ideas related to these themes and which seek to answer questions such as these, or indeed, by default, have done so.
Keywords: Megaliths, Earthworks, Cultural Landscapes, Social engagement, Shared Worlds
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How do we define normal and abnormal behavior?
How can we determine What is Normal Behavior and What is Not?
The idea
"of physical illness is readily understood: the body becomes infected or inflamed, or grows abnormally, or is affected in any number of ways, all of which can be studied conventionally with laboratory tests or under a microscope. But a mental illness is something else altogether. Mental illnesses, or emotional illnesses, are disturbances of behavior and of feeling and thought. They are disorders of function that do not correspond readily to precise physical impairments and that seem, therefore, intangible--vague, aberrant expressions of the mind. At the same time, they are elusive, because they seem to be only exaggerations of the way ordinary people think and behave. And so they are".
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Normality is something we define, we chose, an agreement of the society we live in. ("eating spiders" here vs in the rainforest). The most behavior is like the most normality differing from the true "relaxation", the "true normality" - the state no force is activated, nothing is "needed", the state of natural changes - this state is called love (or beeing in harmony with the absolute).
The most "behavior" deviates from "beeing normal" but we (our current social system, the most religions etc) define this deviation from love as normal. Therefore so many dys-harmonic (diabolic from greec dia: apart and balein: to throw) "normalities" like pollution, patriachal structures (in a separating sence), mass-farming, war, hunger and many other love disconnected behaviors are possible. Because WE define them as "normal".
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researcher in anthropology of religions in Latin America. I published four books and more than one hundred articles. I don’t know well your kind of
organization. If you can give me more details, It would be welcome.
Cordially.
Marion Aubrée
(anthropologist in CRBC and CéSor in Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris)
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I am trying to know the possibility of application of this theory to the interpretation of archaeological artifacts and other ancient evidence.
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this reply comes rather late, but Pascal Boyer and Pierre Lienard have written many fantastic papers on the cognitive and evolutionary foundations of the “obvious” aspects of ritual (repetition, boundaries, stereotypy, etc.) outlined by Rapport. They also identify threat-detection as an important mechanism in the mediation of ritualized behaviour.
cheers
Samuel
Liénard, P., & Boyer, P. (2006). Whence collective rituals? A cultural selection model of ritualized behavior. American Anthropologist108(4), 814-827.
Boyer, P., & Liénard, P. (2006). Precaution systems and ritualized behavior. Behavioral and brain sciences29(6), 635-641.
Lienard, P., & Lawson, E. T. (2008). Evoked culture, ritualization and religious rituals. Religion38(2), 157-171.
Boyer, Pascal, and Brian Bergstrom. "Threat-detection in child development: An evolutionary perspective." Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 35, no. 4 (2011): 1034-1041.
Boyer, P., & Parren, N. (2015). Threat-related information suggests competence: A possible factor in the spread of rumors. PloS one10(6), e0128421.
Veissière, S., & Gibbs-Bravo, L. (2016). Language, Ritual, and Placebo Sociality in a Community of Extreme Eaters. Food Cults: How Fads, Dogma, and Doctrine Influence Diet, 63.
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Greetings to all
Can we establish a new concept for man that takes into account the ideas of moral morality and also does not sacrifice the religious constants that have the credit to bear the burdens of man and humanity through ancient history?
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I would say that human beings are the only species that is partially determined and partially undetermined by its genetic makeup and the impact of its five senses. Humans can be understood as in the imago Dei by virtue of the fact that they have soft libertarian freedom: in some significant circumstances, humans have the ability to choose between alternatives. This is especially evident in the moral arena.
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Will this work only focus on the various Christian traditions or is the breadth to incorporate other traditions? Most traditions incorporate an idea of a malevolent species of creatures that is broadly covered by the idea of demons, such as jinn, nagga, bunyips, spirits, etc. Muslim communities have a substantial body of literature and practice on exorcisms and there has been an increase of Islamic ruquya practice within non-Muslim countries. Is this something that this project will cover?    
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Interesting project. In other examples of this kind of work did incorporate or attempt to engage with these types of questions cross-culturally and interreligiously. I think it will probably go there in other volumes. Maybe check out if they are affiliated with a broader research question.
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I needed some help with this topic. This is for my psychology research paper. I wanted to know if there are any helpful links and/or ideas that anybody can help me with. Thank you.  
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The UN has a report on abortion policies for every country in the world. http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/abortion/
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E.g. 'Cosa Montana' for a hypothetical mountainous area of the Ager Cosanus.
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In that case it is legitimate whenever the reader is warned that it is a retrospective use of the medieval toponym.
Thank you
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I am trying to find research papers and literature about carved boxwood prayer beads dated 1470-1500s.  Other than the occasional museum catalogue entry, information is very sparse.  Can anyone recommend research paper or literature please?
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I am sorry I need to know this wood for use and whether it is part of a mass in the church
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The OLAF
report 2015
Sixteenth report of the
European Anti-Fraud Office,
1 January to 31 December 2015
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Well, if you are asking about 'on the street' action, you can coordinate the activities of those who are being excluded to organize an initial resistance. In the U.S., we call this "voting with your wallet"- simply get people to stop buying (to the degree they can) from those who are practicing unequal economics. A good recent example you may have heard of (although outside my own class experience!) is efforts to boycott United Airlines, after the apparent injustice toward a customer. Or, consumers can shift to buying from companies that don't deal with risky stock options and other economically dangerous actions, and so on. The key is educating the people who are in the middle- because they have enough resources to help those who don't, but not so many to be part of the upper-end 'problem', themselves.
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Buddhism had spread into the Far East, but not Hinduism.  Far Easterners translated voluminous Buddhist literature.  Buddhism and Hinduism came from South Asia.
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Two answers to this question.  First, Hinduism has not traditionally been a missionary religion (though some specific Hindu schools of thought have proselytized; but this is atypical).  Second, in a sense, it did spread to East Asia.  The Alan Watts quote that Michael David Kurak has provided is not far off the mark.  The boundaries of these traditions as depicted in modern-day accounts were not so sharp in earlier periods of history.  Buddhism in practice is full of Vedic deities, artistic forms, mantras, and so on.  If you pay a visit to the temple to Kannon/Avalokiteśvara in Kyoto, Sanjusangendo, all the guardian deities surrounding the central image of the bodhisattva are Hindu: Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, Lakshmi, Saraswati, etc.  The whole family is there, with Japanese names and facial features.
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Especially interested in sugar or coffee plantations
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Muchísimas gracias.
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I´m writing a thesis about use wear analysis of bronze age axes in area of nowadays Czechia. Do you know some similar works? I know a lot of works about use wear analysis of swords and halberds but I didn´t find some about axes. Thank you very much. 
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There is a very nice short study of Bronze & Iron Age toolmarks that took advantage of excellent wood preservation from Oakbank Crannog, in Scotland. The author, Rob Sands, was able to look at toolmarks in wood and identify particular axes (not present in the archaeological assemblage) and some of the changing wear on them from the marks they left on preserved wood. He also inferred the use of knives, gouges/chisels,boring tools, and awls, although the toolmarks are not as distinctive as those of the axes. I think this is an elegant study that took advantage of unique preservation to begin developing exciting ways to apply use-wear and extend its utility: 
Sands, Rob, 1997. Prehistoric Woodworking: The Analysis and Interpretation of Bronze and Iron Age Toolmarks. Wood in Archaeology, Vol 1. The Institute of Archaeology, University College London. 
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Do you know of descriptions in which one social constituency positions it’s  version of anarrative as historically ‘true’, whereas a different constituency claims that its own version of the same ‘events’  is ‘symbolic’ in nature? Any bibliography on this aspect of the history/myth dichotomy would be most welcome.
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Thanks all for your very interesting responses.  Best wishes.
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how anthropology views a miracle
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Hello Yvonne
This bibliography might have something relevant:
Likewise this website:
MIRACLES, IN OTHER WORDS: Social Science Perspectives on Healings
Neyrey, J. H. (1999). Miracles, in other words: Social science perspectives on healings. Miracles in Jewish and Christian antiquity: Imagining truth, Notre Dame Studies in Theology, 3, 19-56.
I have not seen the full text of this but it might be of interest:
Shanafelt, R. (2004). Magic, miracle, and marvels in anthropology. Ethnos, 69(3), 317-340.
Very best wishes
Mary
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I am conducting research on university students' religious fundamentalism and its implication to collaborative learning. Would you please pinpoint me the best way to measure religious fundamentalism?
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There are different measures of Religious Fundamentalism:
- The - RFS 12 item revised see Altemeyer and Hunsberger 2004  - unidimensional
- The Intratextual Religious Fundamentalism see Williamson et al. 2010 - unidimensional
- The Multicultural-Fundamentalism Scale see J Liht 2011 - multidimensional
These measures are the "most" used, cross-culturally tested and Content Free. 
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I will be getting an an academic leave this coming fall and want to visit with scientists and mythologist in Greece and Italy.
It appears that much of the neuroscience research that I read comes from Italy. I am looking for advice on a researcher who would be wiling to work with me.
I also want to visit Greece to work with anthropologists or mythologists to deepen my understanding of myth and to see original locales for the observance of rituals.
Can I get some suggestions for who I should talk to and where I should go? Or better yet,
volunteers?
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Thank you all for the answers to my question. As it turns out, I went to Parma and visited with Dr Rizzolatti. It was wonderful and even though the visit was brief, I learned a great deal!
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Do followers of Vodou (Voodoo) in Haiti have any specific attitudes towards the poor, homeless or street beggars? I can't find any texts which address this issue. Any information would be much appreciated.
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Mizè mennen parespè = If you show suffering, then people lose respect for you.  There are several important writers on the relationship between Vodou and Haitian culture.  Karen McCarthy Brown writes that "there is a special shame associated with begging.  When the spirits want to teach a lesson in humility to a devotee, they command that person to don the ritual version of rags and go to the market and beg .  The ignominy of begging comes largely from the fact that beggars are seen as isolated individuals whose activity announces to the world that they have been abandoned by the extended kin group and now must forage on their own.  Even if the family were lost through death rather than discord, the person who must beg can easily be seen as someone who was not clever enough or respectful enough or sufficiently hardworking to find a place as adopted kin in another family."
(Brown, K. M. (2006). Afro-Caribbean spirituality: A Haitian case study. In C. Michel & P. Bellegarde-Smith (Eds.), Vodou in Haitian life and culture; Invisible powers (pp. 1-25). New York: Palgrave Macmililan.) The editors of this book have published extensively in books and peer-reviewed journals about Vodou.  I just noticed that you are in California: Get in touch with Claudine Michel and Patrickk Bellegarde-Smith who are associated with KOSANBA (The Congress of Santa Barbara) which is a scholarly association for the study of Haitian Vodou.
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I've started to investigate rites, tradition, law, permission, about Muslim burial in contemporary Italy. I'm starting from an explorative sociological point of view. I'd like to compare my ongoing findings to European situations. Bibliography and articles suggestions are welcome.
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Dear Francesco,
It might be usefull to look into publications of Claudia Venhorst. She's a researcher at the thanatology centre in Nijmegen, the Netherlands and her focus of research within this field is Islam.
Anne
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I am conducting a research on "wheat and religions", and am interested in cereal offerings in the larger context of defining the nature and rationale of non bloody sacrifices in different religious settings.
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Truly interesting, many thanks!!!
I have finished a kind of encyclopedic article on "Wheat and religion" for the "World Wheat Book, volume 3" to be published in September, but (together with the main editor of this publication, Alain Bonjean) am still engaged into a comparative research on cereals and rituals. So, still reaping these grains of wisdom, myths and practices...
Will keep you up to date….
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It appears that there are different options of doing the economy in different Christian churches (orthodox, catholic, protestant). We would like conduct research focused on livelihood strategies of priests, who are dependent from local community on the one, and diocese on the other side.
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Mr. Fikfak,
One may wish to look at Max Weber's "The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism."  While much criticism has been raised about this work, I think there is value in what Weber is saying.  The mistake made by many is they claim Weber is showing a cause and effect while I see only a correlation that may have enhanced the environment for the development of capitalism in the USA.  One must be careful of claiming historical accidents as intended cause.  As the old academy saw goes, 'Correlation is not causation.'
Weber and others did not see the Catholic influence making a contribution toward capitalism's development.  This may be too simply stated, because the Catholic Church developed the organizational structure that was used to develop large capitalistic organizations.  
If you are looking only at clergy's strategies for survival from a material standpoint, I would think that the structure of the different faith communities would hinder.  This is especially true for the Protestants, where materialism is much more accepted as a sign of election.  I think this is absent in the Catholic Churches where the spiritual is more the goal, and the material is no indicator of progress.  In fact, there are orders in the Catholic Church that take vows of poverty.  This would tend to be quite contrary to the Protestant notions.
I wish you the best on your research.  I'd be delighted to see your work.
Neal 
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I am writing my bachelor's thesis at the moment, the topic is: globalization as a social identity threat. I want to look at this topic from the perspective of religious and cultural groups, how they see globalization as a stressor and how they react to it. To measure my outcome variables I am looking for a scale to asses ingroup bias and one to assess 'radicalization' (e.g., muslims who favor fundamentalism after the manipulation).
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You could use the Social Profile* to determine if there are two sub-groups in your larger group. This could be used for discussion with the group as to whether the sub-groups are undermining the larger group, or are OK, or add to the group's richness.
*[AOTA Press. com and www.Social-Profile.com.]
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The etymological similarity of Maya with the Maayans of Meso America are huge. Is there a relationships between the Earliest Civilizations of India and South America that can prove the relation
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Thank you David Charles Wright-Carr I would keep searching and Since Maya Civilization is a vast topic and needs a lot of background reading which I do not have at present. I will remove my first post . But at the same time I would keep following the work of science which deals with the etymological similarity of Maya with the Maayans of Meso America. For me the interest in this field was born out of curiousity and the intended post was written just in transmitting the information I gained
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I am trying to think of a theoretical framework that I can use to base and analyze my study on the phenomenon of spirit possession in Kenya.
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Have you read Desjarlais' book on Yolmo (Sherpa) shamans, called Body and Emotion ?
Also, a more heady treatment by Tom Csordas, The Sacred Self, read for the theoretical approach. Have you ever read "Mama Lola"? about a vodu priestess in NY ? very good.
What you want to do is mix cognitive with emotive; I find it very hard to speak of religious and spiritual phenomena in purely cognitive categories. See also, Shelly Rosaldo's Knowledge and Passion in Ilongot society.
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Throughout history we have evidenced some religious political movements that force to rule the governments. They proclaim some rights they think they have to rule states e.g. Christian states, Islamic states etc. Since countries are naturally have mixed people of different religions, what is the basis for a religion to claim supremacy and power politically to rule a country?
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While it is true, Emmanuel and Karrar, that religion should not be the basis for ruling a State, the reality of history is that religions do become such a basis. The most glaring contradiction is the Papal State, the Vatican, when Christ said, "Give to Caesar what is Caesar´s and to God what is God´s." Fortunately, the Vatican today is fairly apolitical thanks to its present leader, but in the Renaissance the opposite was the case. One could point to other states-- Islamic States-- where religion has become the basis. So there is no use denying an actual fact of the religiously grounded State. I live in the United States, founded on the principle of the separation of church and state, but there are many reactionaries here today who would love to change that principle in their own ways.
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I'm investigating the links between the church and the emergency room as -- conceptually speaking -- places of sanctuary that in many ways are nearly synonymous. Work in any field regarding this subject will be extremely useful to me. One might view the emergency room as a secular church or confessional or mission, and vice versa. Any thoughts, links, guidance, etc. will be most appreciated. Thank you.
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I'm making researches on a few underground places of worship in Italy, so it would be of a great help if I could compare with similar places in Europe.
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A temple built before the pyramids
Hal Saflieni Hypogeum: 3600-3000 BC
Malta!
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Of course religion helps organizing a society and life. But so does science, law, etc... These are important but 'utilitarian' functions of religion. Many people today believe that in the age of science religion is not needed (and could only be useful for uneducated people). For the purpose of this question I consider religion as internal spirituality (not a concrete religion with its regular specific customs). So, is there a fundamental cognitive function of religion?
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As far as the developed/non-developed duality that was referred to above, I think it's worth pondering whether the hunter/gatherer people's weren't even more spiritual than thier modern day counterparts. . . . There's a difference between 'spirituality' and 'religion'. Spirituality refers to one's basic stance toward the universe, toward one's life, toward the great and awesome mysteries that our existence on this planet evokes within us, and spiritual revelations are relatively fluid and temporary. Religion, on the other hand, is an attempt to 'codify' or 'objectivy' particular spiritual 'revelations' into formulas that make those highly personal and fluid spiritual revelations 'accessible' to others. Religion is the priviledging of some sets of spritual revelations over others, and there is a power dimension to religion that does not directly attend spirituality.