Science topics: Anthropology
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Anthropology - Science topic

Anthropology is an any and everything anthropological.
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Communication is the key-word for both COVID causes and effects. Consequently, "life will not be the same" for the Social Sciences too. Researchers will soon want to develop a broader vision and new perspectives. This question is an invitation to brainstorm the future of the social paradigm.
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How to establish new theories in the field of digital communication ?
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Do I have a right sense, when I imagine that traditional anthropology which studied 'primitives', is near to biological than to socio-cultural?
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Traditional anthropology, imo, is closely connected to the eminent biological works of Charles Darwin. I would say that ethnography via B. Malinowski, E. Durkheim and W. Wundt brought the turn to the socio-cultural perspective, i.e. the interplay of cultural psychology and material conditions of life.
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Since mental health is the most prominent issue in 21st century. Interdisciplinary approaches might be the prominent and potent field of research. How can we interrelate mental health issues with anthropology with references to anthropology? Are there any established practices followed by certain community and culture?
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Psychological anthropology is the study of psychological topics using anthropological concepts and methods. Among the areas of interest are personal identity, selfhood, subjectivity, memory, consciousness, emotion, motivation, cognition, madness, and mental health.
https://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199766567/obo-9780199766567-0124.xml A very close relationship is found between anthropology and psychology. Psychology studies the mental creations and behaviors of humans. Anthropology, on the other hand, is a holistic study of humans. There is a comparative study of human behavior and experiences.
Imo, the most exciting intersection is the history of madness, with respect to madness and civilization, e.g. rapid cultural change and mental health.
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What do you mean by anthropology in public sphere? Kindly share your idea(s) about the role of anthropology in global peace and development.
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Robert Borofsky, for one, has invited anthropologists to move beyond the immediate compass of their discipline; illuminate larger social issues; and encourage broad, public conversations with the explicit goal of fostering social change. (Some have criticized Borofsky's concept of "public anthropology", or what this query terms "anthropology in the public sphere", on the ground that "applied anthropology" is already about the application of the methods and theory of anthropology to the analysis and solution of practical problems.) Irrespective, there can be doubt that applied/public anthropology can shine a light on global peace and development, for example by investigating the personal, relational, structural, and cultural dimensions of conflict.
Presentation Learning for Peace
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I'm starting to work in vulnerable communities. I'm interested in instruments and research techniques to do an anthropological study.
Furthermore, I'm looking for Partners.
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Clifford Geertz in his work The Interpretation of Cultures states that all anthropological writings are interpretations of culture one way or the other: “In short, anthropological writings are themselves interpretations, and second and third order ones to boot. (By definition, only a "native" makes first order ones: it's his culture.)" (1973:15). Geertz here reechoes the words of Malinowski in his Introduction to The Argonauts of the Western Pacific that an ethnographer should strive “to grasp the native’s point of view, his relation to life, to realize his vision of hisworld” (1932:25).
Thus, while it would be useful to follow the ethnographic method in your study, the related ethnographic indicators could be taken into account. For an understanding of these, Writing Culture by James Clifford and George E. Marcus (1986) could be read.
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Hello! I'm writing my (anthropology) thesis on the taboo of the prostate and how men's sexuality is shaped by patriarchal gender norms. This means I need to conduct an ethnography on my university campus, interviewing students about their sexual practices. Since this is a delicate topic and I'm not sure how to formulate my interview questions, I was wondering if any of you know of an ethnography/book/documentary/article/interview that I could use to get inspiration from. The sources don't have to be anthropological, any help is much appreciated :)
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I suggest Sabah Mahmood
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I'm struggling to find literature that can answer this seemingly straightforward question.
It seems apparent that for someone trying to integrate themselves into a new culture/society, learning the language is necessary.
I'm wondering however if there have ever been studies that have measured the degree to which speaking and reading/writing are differentially correlated with the degree of cultural integration?
Suppose a new immigrant had limited time/resources, and could either spend their time trying to speak to as many people as possible, or read as many texts as possible. Which one should they prioritize?
Any help is appreciated, thanks.
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As acculturation can be defined as the process of learning the norms, values and behaviours expected by the culture in which the individual immigrated, meaning, in this respect, what is socially expected from the immigrants who want to settle and stay in the host country, I would say that the spoken language is defintely the main tool to do and show all this, at least in the first phases of acculturation, that is, the stronger sociological predictor.
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What is Islamic anthropology? is it a new discipline? or a sub-field in Anthropology? or Islamization of western anthropology?
If I take the first question, then, would claim a Quranic Anthropology?
If a new discipline, then what would be the methodology? is it recasting the Malinowskian fieldwork and techniques?
If Subfield, then obviously, what is the line of demarcation with Anthropology of Islam of Islamic Anthropology?
Scholars, in the locked down time, can we discuss?
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A scientific field worth researching, we may work on developing research matters and increasing studies in it..but the answer needs a lengthy search
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Heading off to the American Anthropological Association meetings next week, I find myself thinking about technical terminology and jargon as I prepare the talk I will give as a discussant. I have been to many panels over the years that are easily accessible by a wide variety of scholars and also many that are virtually impenetrable by anyone outside of a very tiny circle. Do we have any obligations to be inclusive of scholars outside our specialization or perhaps on the edge of our field of interest in a conference presentation?
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From listeners point of view simple, accessible content is more worthy. Few technical terms are required to explain the main content.
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Entomophagy is practiced in various parts of Oaxaca, however, it's history is unclear. While its place in central Mexico is more evident, it has been difficult to find data and information on its practice in Oaxaca, and in particular where chapulines (toasted grasshoppers) might fit. Grateful for any insights.
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Good Day!
I was thinking whether Edward Said's theory and his writings on anthropology represented the death of anthropology or a new life through the awareness of important concepts such as representation, (we) versus (them). I think that the post-colonial Theory provided an important vision for anthropology and literature, so what do you think about post-colonial Theory and its Impact on anthropology?
Wishing everyone a Happy New Year!
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Happy new year Dr. Heba.
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This question arises out of December 2021 Scientific American article Spying on your emotions by John McQuaid, and two articles it refers to, Facial expressions of emotion are not culturally universal by Rachael Jack et al., Emotional Expressions Reconsidered: Challenges to Inferring Emotion From Human Facial Movements by Lisa Feldman Barrett et al.
The question is considered in
A possible way to test the question is suggested at the end of the article, in section 6.2.
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Hi,
Here are some references
Rama T, Wichmann S. A test of Generalized Bayesian dating: A new linguistic dating method. PLoS One. 2020 Aug 12;15(8):e0236522. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0236522
Gray RD, Atkinson QD, Greenhill SJ. Language evolution and human history: what a difference a date makes. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2011 Apr 12;366(1567):1090-100. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0378.
Serva M, Petroni F, Volchenkov D, Wichmann S. Malagasy dialects and the peopling of Madagascar. J R Soc Interface. 2012 Jan 7;9(66):54-67. doi: 10.1098/rsif.2011.0228
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I'm part of a project creating a public atlas to document and map people's subjective experiences of extreme weather events. I've included information and a link to a short survey below. Feel free to fill this out yourself, and/or forward to your networks via email, social media, etc. Thanks!
Extreme Weather Events Survey
Ecologies of Harm: Mapping Contexts of Vulnerability in the Time of Covid-19 The University of British Columbia
This is a digital commons project intended to provide equitable access to knowledge.
COVID-19 presents the potential for people and groups to become exposed to harm in new ways. To see the overlapping ways in which these harms may be occurring, we’ve designed a survey for experiences of extreme weather events that are affecting people across the world.
This is a citizen / community observation survey, open to anyone 18 years of age and older who wishes to contribute. Your descriptions will upload directly to an interactive map of the world that is publicly accessible on this website: https://blogs.ubc.ca/ecologiesofharmproject
Your participation is entirely voluntary, and you do not have to answer every question. If you do wish to participate, you do not need to record your name. You may contribute as many observations as you like!
Please share widely, and keep in mind that re-posting, “liking,” or “following,” will be visible to others on public network platforms.
Link to survey: https://arcg.is/fvO4G0
Principal Investigator: Dr. Leslie Robertson
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indeed very interesting
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This thread is for those who want to know how to calculate Research Interest (RI) and participate in this validation study. *** Welcome to the validation study of my formula for Research Interest (RI) on the RG site! Details are in the first reply in this discussion.
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Hello, good day.
Please I'm working on a project which needs a "review of relevant theories" of the study "medical negligence behavior"
I found 2 theories relating to this study (conflict theory and theory of negligence), but they are not enough.
Please can I get more theories concerning medical negligence?
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There are four legal elements which must be proven: a professional duty owed to the patient; breach of such duty; injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages.
In general, malpractice claims are adjudicated in state courts according to laws (e.g., USA), which typically require three elements for a successful claim: the patient suffered an adverse event; the provider caused the event due to action or inaction; and 3) the provider was negligent, which essentially entails showing that the provider took less care than that which is customarily practiced by the average member of the profession in good standing, given the circumstances of the doctor and the patient. Collectively, this three-part test of the validity of a malpractice claim is known as the “negligence rule.” In theory, this rule should provide compensation to iatrogenically injured patients and lead doctors to take appropriate precautions against accidental harm. In practice, however, the rule performs poorly on both dimensions.
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The fields cited in the question are the scientific fields in which we are affiliated to carry out research
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Rivers State University, Port Harcourt or you try University of Port Harcourt
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What is more important to study when it comes to anthropology?
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According to the type of Anthropology in question: Eg. Cultural Anthropology is not the same as Paleo Anthropology, Comparative Anatomical Anthropology, etc., etc., etc.
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We could conceive of a society in which men practically never meet face to face—in which all business is conducted by individuals in isolation who communicate by typed letters or by telegrams, and who go about in closed motor-cars. (Artificial insemination would allow even propagation without a personal element.) Such a fictitious society might be called a ‘completely abstract or depersonalized society’. Now the interesting point is that our modern society resembles in many of its aspects such a completely abstract society.
-The Open Society and Its Enemies Ch.10
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And he added:
"Of course, our picture is even in this form highly exaggerated. There never will be or can be a completely abstract or even a predominantly abstract society—no more than a completely rational or even a predominantly rational society. Men still form real groups and enter into real social contacts of all kinds, and try to satisfy their emotional social needs as well as they can."
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'An initial review of "name of article" has made it clear that this submission does not fit within the scope and focus of Secularism and Nonreligion as it stands. We would be delighted to consider a reworked version of the article if you can  more clearly position it within the interdisciplinary scope of the journal by engaging clearly with scholarship in the history, sociology and/or anthropology of secularism. A concerted reading of some of our back issues should provide a solid grounding. Also, making the broader implications of the article beyond the Kazakh context would strengthen things. Alternatively, you might also consider submitting this manuscript to another journal. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but, as I say, if you do rework things as suggested we would happily consider putting this through the review process.' This is decision of the journall editor. What is mean?
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It means that your article does not seem to fall within the scope (purpose) of the journal. The editors are willing to consider a resubmission if you rework the manuscript to be more in line with their scope. They suggest that you read older issues to get a better feel for the scope.
In saying that their scope is interdisciplinary, they mean that manuscripts need to address their topics from the perspective of more than one discipline.
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We need to know how much attention has been paid to architectural research from an anthropological point of view today. Is it important for architects to know this approach?
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Study of anthropology guides an architect to relate the architectural aspects of a building to the people who will inhabit the building. An architect uses anthropology to understand how architecture influences peoples, how it makes people, how it shapes them and how it sustains social relations between people.
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Dear RG Academics who Travel,
This is an important topic because many academics relish going to desirable places for conferences. My husband and I used to travel to scientific conferences but so much red tape is involved he and I are glad to attend mostly on video conferencing technologies (yes, like Zoom and others whose names I don't know. No intent to favor one or the other technology company)
It is good to remember that social bragging rights do not equal additions to knowledge (i.e., what exotic place one has traveled lately.). Yet, local economies are helped by all kinds of conferences and the money that they bring.
There are costs and benefits either way, so please share your ideas about continuing in-person conferences when there is little we cannot do via remote presentation, informal conferring and virtual "hallway" chatter.
Look look forward to your ideas.
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Good question related to all of academicians! Its true there is lot of codal formalities to get funding and visa processing time etc. I think face to face attending is better than online mode. As we can make new connections, friends, links in the field, visit different places, understand the work of other and many more. I was lucky to have chances to visit different places in the world. Currently lockdown stations shifted most of the academic activities as online mode. I hope situation will be better soon and we again have a chance.
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Dear all
I have a crucial methodological question. I am working on the problem of food waste sensitivity (field of consumer behaviour) and its antecedents. Among the concepts which we suppose could be determinant (perceived sacredness of the food, a rather anthropological concept), do not have an adapted or adaptable measurement scale. My question: does this justify the construction of a measurement scale in the thesis project? Or such a project (development of a scale in a PhD thesis) must concern only the variable of interest (endogene) of the thesis, (in addition I am not an anthropological expert). I look forward to your response and thank you in advance.
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This is the software developed by IBM for model building only .it is adding function of spss . Various video of prof Gaskin available. Even if some one has strong theoretical framework and sound data collection then this invariance techniques can applying to examine it is established scale or not .
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I would like to add some visual example to illustrate the different types of participant observation (complete observer, observer as participant, participant as observer, and complete participant). Any suggestion is welcome.
Thank you,
Isabella
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In researching the enduring place of racism in society, I have been impressed with Leon Poliakov's 1971 analysis of various social mythologies/genealogies in "The Aryan Myth." I am also interested in hearing other perspectives on the "stickiness factor" of these ideas.
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The cause of racism is not skin color, but human thinking. Therefore, healing from racial prejudice, xenophobia and intolerance should be sought primarily in rescuing from misconceptions that for centuries have been a source of misconceptions about the benefits or, conversely, the lower position of various groups among mankind.
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The Ages of Life and the basic essential connection to the Earth that we all share, regardless of color or Race
Which other cultures have mystical references and metaphors in their music?
And please share examples with us- for our mutual upliftment
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Yes, many of the new styles, trends and types of music that arose in developed and developing economies from the late 19th century to the present day drew from various forms of music derived from African cultures.
Regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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I have moved away from asking students in a variety of classes (ethnographic methods, introductions to anthropology as well as advanced courses) to develop unique projects. I have a few reasons for these changes and am interested in learning what others think.
In place of unique projects, I give students short "experiments" where they can apply effort to specific work. For example, in methods, I give students a subject and ask them to develop questions, analyze responses, think about ethics and about what does and does not work. My goal is to teach the conduct of inquiry and it is my belief that regardless of the project, there are some basic skills that will define success. Additionally, anthropological research does not take place in the span of a few weeks--and teaching students they can successfully complete a project in a semester is problematic to say the least. So, my question is how do you manage classes where students are learning methods or applying anthropological concepts? Do you give students free reign to develop a project they are interested in? Do you give students an assigned series of exercises? Or is there an alternative that works for you that I and others can learn from?
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Ethnography can help investigate very complicated or critical design challenges. A ... Ethnography was popularised by anthropology, but is used across a wide ... The aim of an ethnographic study within a usability project is to get 'under the ... As discussed above, ethnographic studies do not always require a long
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Dear All,
I have noticed that there are a few companies, which are selling awards for research scholars and professors. For example, I often receive such emails (mentioned below) from different companies. What is your opinion on this?
"Dear Sir/Madam ... No fee for submitting your nomination. If selected by our review committee then you will be considered as a Premium Member of InSc with many technical benefits to which you have to register by paying a package amount of Rs.5000/- which includes 18% GST & postal charges within India. For foreign countries, registration fee is 100USD which also includes postal charges. Benefits are mentioned below: 1.Hard copy of the certificate with respective Award Title and Brass plated Memento will be given where awardee name and work details will be mentioned. 2. Life time valid  InSc Professional Membership which is worth of Rs.1500/- will be given. Id card and certificate will be issued for the same.For more details and benefits visit www.insc.in/membership 3.He/She will be considered as reviewer for our InSc Journals and certificate will be issued for the same. For more details on InSc Journals log on to www.insc.in/journals 4. Registered participants details along with photo will be published in the InSc Year book which will be circulated among more than 15,000 subscribers and soft copy of the year book will be given. 5.His/Her details will be displayed in our awards department page www.insc.in/awards which has page views in thousands. 6. He/She may be invited as a session chair / resource person for InSc events in his/her area of expertise 7. Support  for Book Publication with ISBN. For more details visit www.insc.in/iph 8. Support for publication in Scopus, UGC, SCI listed Journals 9. Free plagiarism checking service. 10. Platform to interact with research experts at INSC Conferences www.insc.in/conferences 11. 10% Reduction in fee of INSC events like International conferences, Seminars and workshops. 12. InSc Professional Member will get free access to all the InSc papers available in InSc Digital Library of Research Papers (DLRP) www.insc.in/dlrp 13. There will be a region wise Coordinator and Chief Coordinator for InSc members based on their involvement and support to INSC technical operations. 14.  Adds points to your API score as per NAAC and UGC API Score criterias. For more details visit www.insc.in/awards"
Thanks in advance.
Regards,
Devi Prasad
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From my point of view, buying various academic titles is immoral from the moral and ethical side. In recent years, there have been many dubious "academies" (I know about 12 of them) that openly sell beautiful titles (academician, corresponding member, etc.). It should be noted that these so-called "academies" are all private offices that are practically not connected with official state academies. The price of all these titles is scanty and these titles are valued among the same "academicians". All these titles will not help the author in obtaining a publication in a prestigious journal (WoS), because conscientious reviewers do not pay attention to these nonsense. And you can publish in less prestigious magazines just for the money.
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A relação entre o ruido urbano e a forma como os diversos atores sociais com ele se relacionam tem vindo a ser negligenciada dentro do seio académico (em especial dentro de áreas como a sociologia, antropologia e estudos urbanos). Por certo que, dentro do horizonte das ideias, ligada a uma relação bilateral entre as paisagens socialmente construidas e a evolução das cidades, existem algumas produções (como a de Carlos Fortuna; Augoyard e Torgue; Halligan e Hegarty; entre outros), mas ainda existe alguma falta no sentido da normalização (ou naturalização de G. Simmel) entre os sons e o meio urbano.
Assim, gostaria de perguntar se, dentro dos constrangimentos que a globalização permite, conhecem mais produções dentro desta área?
Obrigado pelo tempo.
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One of the rights of a citizen is his peace of mind. Lack of responsibility for this issue leads to lack of concentration, aggression and ultimately mental disorders of citizens. This is stated in Article 6 of the Charter of Citizenship Rights: Citizens have the right to participate in the performance of legal responsibilities and to provide the necessary financial resources, clean air, public green space and parks, clean and waste-free passages and a city without pollution. Have audio and ecology.
The main sources of urban noise pollution include factories, construction works, noises from the air conditioning system and noises from transportation (aircraft engine noises, car horns). Noise inside the home, such as the sound of televisions and vacuum cleaners, is also important.
Different sound levels based on the distance of each noise source.
Below are some frequently heard sounds with their approximate decibel levels at the same distance from the noise source. As you can see in the table below, it is defined in terms of "dB (A)" when the measurement is made on an "A" scale to simulate human hearing.
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My apologies for cross-posting but this is an issue that is close to my heart. The University of Sheffield in their wisdom are proposing to close the Archaeology Department for the sole reason they are not making money!
The department has been a leading institute for prehistory research and has trained hundreds archaeologists in environmental archaeology and anthropology over the years. It is a vibrant community that has been reduced to 11 teaching staff but the University is run by accountants...
Please support our fellow archaeologists at Sheffield by signing this petition.
Also please disseminate this information through your networks. #SaveSheffieldArchaeology!
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Hi both,
I don't think the Department is not making money, not at all. In fact, as far as I know, the economic figures have not been disclosed by the university. I think the University Executive Board believes they could make more money investing in STEM departments as lecturers cost the same but these typically attract more students. There also a more systemic problem with the UK government reducing funds for arts and humanities departments. I wonder which model of education (and society) are they promoting. In any case, Archaeology at Sheffield is a very successful department and it is probably generating much more money than it requires.
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Any source/s to refer to on identifying methodological gaps/methodology gaps in research?
Please mention the links.
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I can recommend reading the following article. You may get it through Google Scholar:
- Manuela Marra; Carla Di Biccari; Mariangela Lazoi; and Angelo Corallo (2017) A Gap Analysis Methodology for Product Lifecycle Management Assessment, IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, Volume 65, Issue 1.
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Dear all,
I am new in the Mobility of populations movement, coming up with 2 questions:
1. What is the definition of Mobility and Migration in terms of populations movement? What are their differences in Geography and Anthropology?
2. What are the common or well-known conceptual and analytical frameworks and theories for the study at micro and macro levels?
Thanks in advance,
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Hi Li, as per your question, The term "geographic mobility" refers to how people and goods travel over time. A measure that tracks movement within a country is known as geographic mobility, population mobility, or simply mobility. It's a term that's commonly used in demography and population studies to describe the movement of populations between spaces. These relocations may be as big as foreign relocations. Mobility is mostly temporary in nature.
While migration is the movement of people between regions or countries. It is the process of changing's one place of residence and permanently living from a region or a country. According to the UN Demographic dictionary " Migration is such an event in which people move from one geographical area to another area. When people leaving their place of residence and go to live permanently in another area is called migration". It may be temporary or permanent with intentions of returning to the place of origin in future.
For your further clarification attaching some reference below,
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Anthropology is regarded as scientific study of ‘man and his work’. it studies the network of social relationship. Then the two important questions which come to our mind: (1) Are children NOT human beings? (2) Are children NOT part of network of social relationships or social structure?
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Thank you very much for your insightful and analytical reply.
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I think the colonial anthropologists applied it in respect to groups of people who were not yet exposed to the "outside world". So with the growing awareness of mutual intelligibility, among ethnic groups, "tribe" in their context becomes narrow and loses a sense of universality.
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I think this deconstruction should not effect in reduction of point of reference (the number of groups we could call tribes in an isolationist terms). The crux of the matter is to think about tribes in antinaturalist and relationist terms following Morton Fried (as mentioned above).
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In Brazil at a seminar sponsored by the special committee of the Chamber of Deputies, the consensus was that the hardening of punishments applied to juvenile offenders would not be the solution to reduce the practice of criminal acts of the same.
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Exactly, the only thing that is gained from calling a 14-year-old child a criminal is a further decline in the overall structure of the social environment. The system is terrible and beyond repair...worldwide.
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What is the link between anthropology and ethnobotany?
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Salam Sir , a little bit effort for your question. A related paper is attached.
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Does anyone here know scholarship, research, publication, or sources that would be good on the Latin/Roman treatment of "Societas"?
I am reaching out to the community here for some help to understand the use and character of "socius, socii" and "societas" in Roman and Latin customs.  I am very much interested in understanding the difference between what I take "societas" in Latin to mean (the relations among Rome and its Socii) and what the Greeks understood as koinonia.
I am also interested in Roman and Latin practice regarding "socius, socii" and "societas" and what Roman law had to say about the issue. So if can direct me to sources you think I should look at I would be very grateful.
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One of the main sources is Cicero, De Republica, text that translates the Aristotelian concept of "koinonia politike" by "societas civilis". It is probably a key development since "socius" was used to any kind of association from trade to other professional gatherings. Cicero explains that the specific difference which makes a people is to be the unit from a plurality (multitiudo) formed by association (sociatus), on the basis of a legal agreement (consensus juris) and a community of interest (communio utilitatis).
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Because of (Covid-19) Corona, the traditional method of study in anthropology will change.
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Dear Islam Abdullah El-Ghani Ghanem thank you for this excellent technical question. As a chemist I'm certainly not a proven expert in the field of anthropology. However, I'm convinced that this disciplines will be severely affected and changed by the corona pandemic. In this context pleas have a look at the following relevant articles:
1. The (Im)possibility of Ethnographic Research during Corona
and
2. The Future of Anthropological Research: Ethics, Questions, and Methods in the Age of COVID-19: Part I
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I'm having a large dataset consisting of videos, pictures, narratives and interviews about dairy farming practices. This was informed by practice theory. But how does it inform rigorous analysis of data? Or does it require going back to established procedures coming fro m anthropology, sociology, et cetera?
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Hi, I too am applying practice theory ( to understand entrepreneurial opportunity and collective identity construction in start-up teams) and have collected an array of data from ethnographic methods - namely; interviews, observations and documentation. I also am wondering what the conventions are for data analysis in PT and/or interesting novel approaches aside from thematic analyis?
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Does anyone knows results from the new dating program from the Isimila Prehistoric Site in Tanzania?- of course without to give away too much, before a final publication.
The data of ca 260 k.a. from the 1970ies have never been validated with up-to-date methods, so far I know.
Regarding the revised data of Olorgesailie or Kalambo Falls. they may be older than originally estimated,
Thanks
JM
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Here, in the late 1950s, amid a dramatic landscape of eroded sandstone pillars, archaeologists unearthed one of the most significant Stone Age finds ever identified. Tools found at the site – hammerstones, axeheads, flints and scrapers – are estimated to be between 60,000 and 100,000 years old.
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I am interested in examples of anthropological methods that have been applied across different disciplines, for exmple in mathematics education.
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  1. The role of design ethnography in the development of corporate anthropology
  2. The evidence for sociality in fossil primates
  3. Mountain studies in anthropology
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Pesticides become prime compo in agricultural activities to meet the growing demand of the human population. But indiscriminate usage and mishandling led to two disasters in India such as Bhopal (MIC) and Kasaragood (Endosulfon) tragedy. Was there other disasters which were not reported?
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Can I quote this information in my research article?
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Reflections on the strategic future of housing (in terms of the anthropology of space and housing)
- The evolved man, the evolved family and the society also evolved at extraordinary speeds, but the legs of the followers of the modern current in terms of architecture of the inhabitant - standard, stereotyped design, straitjacket type, unique and non-evolving model in time and space- until then remains problematic. So, we often witness uncontrolled self-rehabilitation operations in housing, this terribly affects the architecture proposed and produced by the developer (public or private)… in the absence of a technical and scholarly contribution to settle the problems that are acute there for (Co) tenants and (Co) owners. The old strategies of design and construction of housing (inherited from the modern era) have shown their limit in terms of responses to new concerns, requirements and evaluation: (technical, almost widespread evolution of the elements of comfort, functioning and preferential socio-cultural trends…).
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So changing the strategy involves changing lots of design decisions, which is a cognitively demanding process.
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If someone conducts a PhD research in natural science such as Physics, Chemistry etc, but meanwhile grows interest on social-science related research such as in anthropology, sociology etc and can provide evidences of relevant self-learnt skills, is he/she likely to get a post-doc position in social science? Can anybody share his/her personal experiences on anything similar?
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Yes and no! There's a number of fields which welcome researchers into projects from what might be a non-linear point of view, and there are even some programmes to encourage cross-pollination. However, it doesn't sound like you want to do an anthology of physics project or similar (science and technology studies etc).
Activism studies is also an underfunded but tightknit area, which means you will be competing with people who have developed strong connections and a network through their masters and PhD. It is also now increasingly common to have published during your PhD.
However, there are quite a few opportunities to volunteer on research projects, esp with monitoring and evaluation with charities/third sector organisations. This would help you build up your connects in relation to the area you want to work in, and learn from experts.
It also depends on your long term goals -if you want to work in a uni long term, you are better getting a PhD in the subject you want to work within. If you want to go into international or charity work, then I don't think there would be a value in that. Instead, it is more important to build up a coherent narrative of your background and showing that you have connects.
Good luck!
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Everyone knows, the fast changing climatic condition with altered physical factors due to various anthropologic activities. Humans are unable to handle the issue of climate change due to growing needs and population. So, how nature will resolve the issue of climate change without human interference?
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If greenhouse gas emissions continue to grow in the coming years, the global warming process will accelerate and become an irreversible process in the next several dozen years. Therefore, climate change can be so great that nature will not solve the problem either. Forest fires, droughts, and weather anomalies will intensify. The biodiversity of natural ecosystems will quickly decline, it will be impoverished in terms of the composition of flora, fauna, fungi and microorganisms, and in terms of the genetic composition of the planet Earth's biosphere. Nature will not stop these unfavorable processes of climate change, but will be subject to these processes. So nature, preserving the biodiversity of natural ecosystems, can be helped primarily by people who, by implementing the principles of sustainable development, social environmental (ecological) responsibility, pro-ecological reforms of implementing eco-innovations in economic processes, etc., and other pro-ecological transformation of the traditional brown economy into a sustainable green economy / circular economy can save the biosphere of planet Earth from the climate crisis. If it's not too late, of course. But no matter how much time is left for the implementation of this pro-ecological action plan, it must be implemented urgently.
Best regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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Anthropology and Sociology are two different things to be study. Is that true?
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At some point in the past it might have been reasonable to cast the difference between the two in terms of sociology tending to focus on the society in which it resided while anthropologists tended to concentrate on societies that are different or alien to theirs. Given many of the same theorists inform both disciplines and that both arrived in the academy at about the same time (for example Emile Durkheim), a clear demarcation is not that self evident. Ethnography practices, generally involving participant observation, is common to both. Anthropology has too, for some years, turned its focus on the society in which it resides, be that rural or city societies. Psychology, also arriving at about the same time, also informs both practices these days, though it tends to concentrate on the individual. First sociology and a little later anthropology began critical self-reflection, looking in particular at their epistemological underpinnings. An excellent question Kunalani that requires a lot of unpicking.
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Dear Colleagues around the world at RG,
This is an open forum for your comments. RG is one place where people from all over can exchange views.
The world is a rather hostile and violently competitive place in many aspects. That is not new.
But along with frightening news and media coverage, I do see people forming new pathways to work together. Do yo think that this will help to foster cooperatve behavior as a stimulus?
I think that anthropologists, sociologists, historians, creative field workers in the arts and humanities all can answer this Q from their own field's perspective.
How can we make this happen? That include people in rhetoric and communications, those in public health, manufacturers, etc.
What do you have to share?
This proverb may come from China. The sources say it is difficult to pin down:
"It is better to light just one little candle than to curse the darkness."
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Just as the ocean is made of many droplets. sometimes we can be the change we wish to see.
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With the Mexican Circle of Korean Studies (https://www.facebook.com/CMEC.edu/) we are looking to build a latin-american perspective of korean studies, so we are wondering about the pioneer works and classic texts which are part of the korean studies in and outside of Korea. Thank you so much!
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The book that I remember reading with interest was: CHENG, Sealing. On the Move for Love: Migrant Entertainers and the U.S. Military in South Korea. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013. Nonetheless, I have learned much more about South Korean cultures by visiting the astonishing National Museum of Korea in Seoul. After, one can complement the rich experience by going to the National Folk Museum of Korea.
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Having suffered a MA poetry seminar  where I was the only male amongst 10 women, and resented for being there, is this what you mean by New Australian Poetry?
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the "New Australian Poetry" refers to the Australian Poetry collection edited by John Tranter encompassing the poets of the '68 Movement. The title is a 
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Which method do you think is better and more robust in anthropology? Quantitative or qualitative research methods and why?
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In anthropology and the other social sciences (in fact, in all sciences...), there isn't an apriori preferred method since methodology and methods depend on the research question and subject. One can't decide research starting from selecting a method, but rather from deciding a question. Since research is researching what we don't know, the research question must be "original" or "new". It is true that in anthropology, "qualitative" observation and ethnographic methods are predominant, but there are also good examples of researches using large amounts of quantitative, serial, and statistical data, what is the case of several anthropological studies related to formal and informal education, schooling, students' habits, etc.
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When I looked at the controversy around holding or not holding the World Congress of Anthropology 2023 at the venue of Kalinga Institute of Social Science (KISS) in the Odisha state of India, I found stranger fictions, which often betrayed the facts. Thus, the venue of the Congress became more important than the factuality of the discipline, opinion of the few masqueraded as many, the same individual abstaining from voting indulged in wanton verbose and took a committed position on a particular side while writing letters and memoranda.
I constructed a fact sheet, which seemed to me like writing ethnography of the present for looking at ourselves, here in this case, anthropologists in India. My presence in this narrative was like an interlocutor who not only participated in the dialogues but also tried to understand the events from an ethnographic standpoint with the aim of writing an interpretative account of the crisis.
The foregoing narrative revealed not only the chronology and succession of events leading to a crisis around the organization of the World Congress 2023 in India but also exposed the attitude of the Indian anthropologists towards the discipline as well as in handling a crisis situation. By and large, the Indian anthropologists have failed to generate real academic debate in the public domain around the anthropology and sociology of factory schools and their relationship with the large-scale displacement and socio-economic deprivation of the Adivasis (Indigenous communities designated as ‘Tribe’ in the governmental and anthropological terminology) caused by mining, deforestation and industrialisation in the context of their Hinduaisation in India. This is a tragic outcome of public anthropology in the country.
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This is a very important question and your example demands serious reflection. Unfortunately, the answer to your question is YES, there is an ongoing trend to privilege the venue rather than the conference. Here, in Macau (Macao SAR, Special Administrative Region of China as Hong Kong), there is in the last years a huge investment of the government, the gambling companies, and the main entrepreneurs to attract large scientific conferences. Last year, prior to de pandemic, Macau had the largest GDP per capita in the world fueled by casinos' profits that were 8 times higher than Las Vegas (now, downturned more than 90%). Thus, we had an Asian scholars' conference gathering more than 5000 participants, Latin American conferences, Asian-Latin American-Caribbean conferences, African conferences, etc., all with more than 2000 participants that fuelled the big casinos' venues, hotels, restaurants, and travel agencies. The scientific participation of Macau researchers in these conferences was ridiculous, and their academic and scholarship local impact was zero: none of the 4 universities of Macau offer Asian, Southeast Asian, or Asia-Pacific studies, there are no Latin American or African studies and not even a small research center in these areas. There is, therefore, a huge commofication, commercialization, and industrialization of scientific conferences as a product, touristic or whatever. Are these conferences still mainly scientific and academic? I really doubt...
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I am a PhD scholar of Humanities and my research is broadly connected to Anthropological studies and framework. I have also published with an Anthropological journal of global repute and looking forward to doing a few more. Will my PhD benefit me in Postdoc/Jobs in the field of Anthropology too? I am asking about its scope in India as well as abroad.
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Yes, your PhD is definitely going to help you out for applying in future. You can apply for post doc like ICSSR as well for TISS pdfs. For jobs, you will be welcomed in various state and central universities as teaching faculty for sure..
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The experts of paleoanthropology and paleontology, I have put some pictures of hominid tool in the files (Below the group picture). For protect the sites and the fossils, I hope you take your 2 or 3 minutes .I also welcome you to the hominid group. By the way, All fossils are from tow site. The name beginning with f is from first site. The name beginning with s is from second side. For experts I do not need to say anything. I can find them just because the sites have been destroyed by our city developing. The experts of paleoanthropology and paleontology know our city well.
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Where are the pictures?
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In an article Dr. Blaire suggested that until there was contact with western societies, many societies had a more fluid notion of gender roles https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/inclusive-insight/201809/has-gender-always-been-binary
I am not sure that I agree with this idea. Gender is culturally defined, and is an eidos related to sex, as I suggest in
But that does not mean that gender is likely to be fluid. From what I can see, it is not that gender roles were fluid, but rather that there are simply a number of cultures with ternary and quaternary gender divisions. For instance, many Native American tribes expressed the concept of “two-spirit” people. This established a quaternary gender system. But I don’t think that people easily existed outside of those four roles or that the roles were not well defined. It’s just that there were more of them.
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Given that cultures exist/are concentrated in certain geographical places at particular times in history, am not sure what you are implying. And, patriarchy was a Western system, not a native Indigenous one.
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I´m a undergrad student in anthropology from Peru, anthropology of emotions is not a field with much attention and I believe there´s a heavy emotional aspect in the relation between the employer and the employee in a household , being it even more serious as it tends to be a relation between two women where gender intersects with class and ethnicity. If you could help me with references I would be really happy, would like to know much more about your investigation. Thank you for your time.
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Dear Carlos,
I think that it is an very important topic. Maybe you can read:
GALLARDO, S. (ed.): "Mujer, familia y trabajo", UCAV, Ávila, 2018.
There are two chapters about the woman and the work. One about the thought of Edith Stein. Another about the relationship between woman and work nowadays.
Good luck and don't give up,
Marisa
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I am interested in the process of transmitting technological knowledge from one generation to another in hunter-gatherer societies. What bibliographic references related to this topic do you recommend?
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Sam Lin makes an excellent set of points about learning in traditional societies, particular in regard to hunter-gatherers where accurate scientific knowledge about environments and their common and unusual variations are critical to the success of this economic form of human adaptations. The importance of experiential learning cannot be overstated in the current intellectual debates about how transmission is accomplished. I wish to comment on the use of the term "mythical stories". In my opinion and experience, the continued use of the term "myth" is generally a under appreciation of the empirical scientific knowledge of traditional populations. Elsewhere on RG I have recounted scientifically accurate "stories" about natural events that are couched in metaphors in traditional languages, and may sound quaint or uninformed in translation to fieldworkers who have not learned the language of a particular population (referenced in my 1 March answer here). I have had many such experience in my work with the Pume of Venezuela, where I would ask informants about some of their behaviors, and had to wait up to 1.5 years for them to provide a detailed answer beyond "because" (as I've mentioned on RG before, this is the automatic response to a child's kind of question of ignorance, even by young adult anthropologist or greyhead). I want to recount an interesting Australian example, from the problematic divulgences of Richard Gould in his book 1969 book Yiwara: Foragers of the Australian Desert. Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Gould offended some (many?) Ptjantjara, Ngatajara, and other Aboriginal peoples for including photographs of sacred elements in a waterhole, and possibly some of his descriptions of the events surrounding a teaching went at this location. I wish to recount what I feel is the important learning event that was described, and discuss the use of the term "sacred" by traditional populations that includes practical environmental knowledge. I have spoken extensively with Dick Gould about this event, He identified the visit to the Pukura waterhole (pp. 120-128, as an example of the importance of experiential environmental learning and he agrees that what he described in Yiwara as a set of "ritual" activities is really just science as we conceive of it, although it includes a level of cultural importance that can be approximated by some of our anthropological and popular terms implying r"religious" significance, but is not mythological. Gould begins this discussion referencing Norman Tindale's point that alleged "myths" about landscape features and initiations were practical teaching. When they arrived at the waterhole, Gould describes the men clearing off the vegetation grown around it, adding mud from within the waterhole all around its banks, and then coat it with red ochre. As they removed mud from the bottom of the waterhole that , they also retrieved 47 stones and sticks from within the waterhole. These objects were discussed in detail, they had individual stories. These objects were then replaced at the bottom f the waterhole. What was accomplished at Pukura was to stabilize the margins of this waterhole and dredge sediments that had accumulated in it to re-establish its maximum capacity. The 47 objects retrieved were markers of the maximum base of the pool. The activities associated with this event are not "myth', they were mnemonics about what needed to be done to accomplish environmental stewardship of a critical resource. The stories, dances, songs, costumes, etc. associated with not only Australian Aboriginal practices such as this but in many societies are "sacred" in a sense that maintaining a healthy, functioning environment for hunting & gathering is a critically important cultural practice. I believe that many traditional people identify a number of practices as sacred or part of their "religious" life because they understand that (at least now in what we hope is a more tolerant social milieu that does no denigrate practices outside of the more common Abrahamic, Buddhist, Shinto, and other religions of larger populations) these are afforded a certain level of protection, whereas their own views on environmental stewardship have been run roughshod by outsiders for centuries. Only relatively recently have forest managers in Australia recognized that Aboriginal practices of fire management prevent larger, destructive fires. Recent research by Bliege-Bird, Bird, and Codding have demonstrated that smaller fires also create more productive post-fire mosaic environments with more diverse resources (as following recovery, smaller fires create a patchwork of different recovery flora & fauna compared with more monolithic and less diverse succession in the wake of more extensive fires. Traditional peoples are very wise to identify the terms outsiders might respect as the vessel for much of their profound, empirically-based scientific knowledge. Like their kinship systems, Australian Desert peoples have an amazingly diverse set of complex practices that perpetuate the details of environmental variation, distribute that knowledge among a dispersed and interacting set of "different" language population groups, and have developed to make life possible for tens of thousands of years in an extremely challenging kind of environment. Many so-called "initiation rituals" are a forms of making certain that a diversity of environmental knowledge is maintained in a cultural system; another way that humans are able to feed on high value foods and use hunting & gathering as a viable and economic practice even into the 21st century. Learning in traditional societies is infinitely more complex than our modeling expectations about simplistic transmission of information about how to make particular tools or maintain "cultural norms". They actual practices are situationally responsive, constantly updating new information, may cover vast areas depending of the kinds of geography we look at (and that diversity can only be minimally sampled even in long-term ethnographic fieldwork), and have a much greater temporal record of utility than the "schooling" or "apprentice" perspectives that dominate our current modeling approaches to transmission of cultural knowledge. To use a popular culture analogy, the calculus-like complexity of these systems make Mr. Spock's 3-D chess (and many of our modeling assumptions) look like tiddlywinks. Science is astonishing when we confront our own ignorance about how the world works. We must encourage our students to go to the field and explore what is still practiced that can help us better understand the real-life concerns of foragers about managing economic options that are critical to such successful life ways, and will help us more informatively develop models to address what is challenging in archaeological research of past human activities and cultural maintenance of their profound scientific knowledge.
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Anthropology is regarded as scientific study of ‘man and his work’. it studies the network of social relationship. Then the two important questions which come to our mind: (1) Are children NOT human beings? (2) Are children NOT part of network of social relationships or social structure?
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Abdelkader Mohamed Abdelkader Elsayed many thanks for providing the link. This will certainly help us to further our understanding on ethnographies and ethnographers.
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I spent the past few months interning as an independent researcher at the Field Museum in Chicago. Here, I spent my time observing the design procedure that leads up to the creation of a context-focused exhibition. The term culminated with a paper at the end on the nature of objects in such exhibitions. I'm currently looking for places which can help me review, edit, and publish this work. Any direction would be helpful!
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Some journals will accept conceptual papers, i.e. not based on empirical data collection. But you would still need to draw on the academic literature.
Here is my recommended structure for a conceptual paper:
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Besides Chinese (2600 BC) textual references to gonorrhea-like symptoms, is there any evidence for its (presumably) more ancient origins? In the Near East or Africa perhaps? 
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Gonorrhea is an ancient human disease, with references to its symptoms found in the Old Testament of the Bible (Leviticus 15:1–3). For almost 700 years, it has been known as “the clap,” a likely reference to the old Le Clapiers district of Paris where prostitutes were housed.
Please check this link:
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Hi there,
I have troubles verifying a journal I recently published an article in. The name of the is "Teaching Anthropology: a Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute."
Could you tell me how to insert the name?
Many thanks,
Mascha Gugganig
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It is present in the paper or abstract
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Along with a colleague, I am getting a book proposal together for a collection of chapters on health and well being research in custodial settings. The book will focus upon different approaches to conducting research in this topic within this setting. We are looking for authors. Are you interested?
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Thanks, Paul. I'll try the email address.
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Navigating paradox does not only entail a solution to the problems that we are struggling with nowadays because of it or not, but it changes the nature of these problems that we had, have and/or having yet involve us in a thinking that is apart from the one we are used to. it takes us to a place where experience and reason coopete to deliver an answer that converges the divergent goals of a paradoxical tension along the way, we notice a change in our behaviour, a new sharpe and honed culture in our organizations and whole new set of problems that we did not even know they existed arise as we exploit more and more of paradox powers.
Hope you will meditate with me on my little small thought and help me get it as right as it can be for my second publication.
Best regards
Maci
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Dear
Ben Levin
Your reasoning is impeccable, also it is well aligned with the era when the brain was considered to be what it is and never change which is by the way not along ago. Developments in brain plasticity have given more insights than we could have ever imagined. I would recommend my introductory paper published on my profile. the question is not the question of utility nor the question of already existing means. the questions here above all are: : can we ignite and shape our brain plasticity to suit the requirements of given tensions of paradox. Can we develop an organization culture where an answer that does not satisfy two divergent goals is considered not enough? can we think and act on different level than the one we know? from this point onward the issues you brought become dependent on the bigger picture which allows us to even push harder taking in consideration that the nature of the paradoxes is abound and last but not least some paradoxes are not meant to be solved they just replaced.
I hope that would help with some new insights and i believe that once i am done with my research and finally some university grants me a chance to graduate everyone will have the chance to apply paradox tensions to their advantage.
please stay tuned i will publish my next article on the above concept very soon and i will upload it here right away.
my best regards,
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Present humanity is based on application of S&T. Political and social framework provide a base to development of S&T. This framework is not so strong due to selfish nature of individuals in a community.
The other issue is that invertebrates and primitive organisms may be more successful in the changed climatic conditions in future due to their adaptability and immense reproduction rates.
Knowledge provides ability to change the environment at the place of changing own DNA and genes. How far humanity can be successful by changing (and damaging) the environment. Adaptability of human society is being ceased due to increasing dependency on medical facilities.
Can S&T sustain without strengthening political, cultural and ethical framework?
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OF COURSE NOT.
above the salt , it means:
— Of or in a position of high standing, rank, regard, or repute. The term is derived from the social hierarchy of nobility in medieval times, in which salt, a precious commodity then, was set in the middle of the dining table. Those of high noble rank were seated "above the salt," that is, closer to the lord and lady of the house, while those in lower social standing were seated "below" it.
So, Knowledge is not the whole thing, I guess.
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I wanted to understand the science behind mythotherapy and who are the one's practicing it. What type of mental effects it has and in what amount of time?
A basic definition to mythotherapy from google search, " Mythotherapy is an interdisciplinary therapeutic method which uses myths and sacred texts and mythological findings for therapy; and at the same time uses psychology, cognitive sciences, cognitive behavior therapy, anthropology, philosophy and ancient knowledge and wisdom for therapeutic intentions. Mythotherapy is also a method for knowing the self and self-actualization. What is important in mythotherapy is the fundamental realms of human soul and spirit. They are said to contain archetypes as well as an unconscious knowledge and wisdom. "
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Myotherapy is not part of scientific allopathy. It is offered vias Skype - without any direct patient contact.
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Most of what I have seen regarding the reform of Education is being attempted by educators, exclusively. In order to establish robust reforms, a systemic approach is needed. Inputs and participation are required from experts in diverse fields: raising school funding; increasing appreciation and support for education in families; increasing the professionalism and allowing for innovation in teaching; fostering self-actualization for each student; continual incorporation of new insights about the learning process from neuroscience and psychology; inviting speakers who have been successful in the arts, science, engineering, anthropology, etc., to inspire students.
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Thank you for starting this important discussion, Dr. Lucero. I agree with you on all essential points -- except perhaps one. Before I come to this point, I would like to remind you of a bon mot that I believe is attributed to Benjamin Bloom: the educational reality lags at least 50 years behind the state of scientific knowledge. (However, I am not quite sure whether I would rather follow a proven scientist or an intelligent practitioner in case of doubt, see Ziegler & Vialle, 2017). And this 50-year gap, which I do not question, leaves me stunned.
The point where I don't entirely agree with you is that most reform efforts in education come from educators. In fact, I find that education has become far too much the plaything of various interest groups all trying to bring about reforms in their own sense. Whether it is the economy (education as preparation for a profession) or politics (many ideological education reforms), parents' or teachers' associations, etc., they all have their own agendas.
There are now two things to distinguish: (1) Who determines the direction of the reforms and (2) who is needed to implement them?
For (1) intelligent practitioners and (educational) scientists should provide the essential impetus. For (2) it requires a concerted action of all relevant social forces, otherwise reforms remain piecemeal and reflect the handwriting of the social group that was able to assert itself by chance.
I therefore regard it as the most important task to bring the various actors together. But let's not kid ourselves: Bringing all relevant actors together at one table and getting them to put their own interests aside in the interest of a good education almost sounds like an educational fairy tale. This is politics and goes far beyond the possibilities of the societal subsystem of education.
Reference
Ziegler, A. & Vialle, W. (2017). Using the Actiotope Model of Giftedness to bridge the gap between experiences and practice. In J. A. Plucker, A. N. Rinn, & M. C. Makel (Eds.), From giftedness to gifted education: Reflecting theory in practice (pp. 203-226). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
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So far I have got a primary impression on the existing studies on 'stigma' in the context on Bangladesh is mostly focused on the aspects of 'public health' issues. But, in real life, stigmas are diversified in many ways based on different social, cultural, political and economic situations. I feel, it is really very important to address this complex issue from the theoretical perspectives of Sociology & Anthropology. Hence I am projecting on a probable in-depth understanding on stigma(s) in Bangladesh from Sociological & Anthropological perspectives, I need to explore & learn first if there is any similar/relative study(s) have been done yet.
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Thanks for your support.
I think that paper you suggested is a good one but not that much related to my quarries. Anyway, I am optimistic to receive similar responses from researchers like you.
Best wishes,
Samiul
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There are a number of common methods to measure religiosity. These include measuring church attendance and self identification of religiosity. However, are these methods valid? In order for self identification to give reasonable results, people have to have a solid understanding of what religion is. Otherwise they may mislabel themselves.
For instance, a person may believe that they're not religious because they don't believe in a god, but a god belief isn't a necessary component of a religion. The belief just needs to be "religioid" in nature:
Moreover, there is potentially a whole group of religions that is going unnoticed, because they are simply placed under the label of "atheists" rather than potentially a religion:
So are we accurately measuring religiosity? If not, does it even matter?
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Religiosity is participation in religious activities or symbols of thereof; you can be religious without exhibiting it or without being a symbol of religiosity. Religiosity has given this world hates, while religious with faith in God and love for His creations is the way to love and peace.
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I am writing a research proposal on sidewalks in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. As you know, the sidewalk is the place of seen and unseen, the symbol of the power. HCMC experienced many historical periods from the French colonial period to the socialist city. The study uses digital anthropological methods to study the sidewalk before and now by picture. Besides, the policy for sidewalk development will be considered and analyzed by the critical indigenous studies
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I want that, I want to apply it to urban development and it is important to study the sidewalk. I want to see the colonial era in Sai Gon, How the French government used sidewalks? And today, how does the HCMC government view sidewalks?
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Max Scheler focuses on human feelings and considers love to be the essence of human nature. Scheler’s argument opens up a broad horizon of possible interpretations regarding the meaning of being human. Contemporary philosophical anthropology takes its point of departure from two opposing conceptions: that attributed to Scheler and that of Plessner. With Scheler and Plessner the anthropological discourse takes into account the challenges emerging from the sciences as well as from the humanities. Scheler focuses on human feelings and considers the love to be the essence of the nature of man. Scheler defines the logic of love as different from the logic of pure reason. Today we can see a new significant interest in emotions, so much so that we openly speak about Emotional Turn and, under the pressure of the migration flows involving Europe, about the consequent increasing interest in themes concerning intercultural and interreligious dialogue. This process has in turn increased the interest for empathy questions and alterity’s phenomenology.
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@ Martin Klvana
have a look at this link please
Scheler's Phenomenology of Love
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In my Anthropology class last week, we discussed that humans are more altruistic than chimpanzees. But working as a Tagalog language interpreter with autistic kids I saw that once a psychologists dropped any object, the autistic child will not pick it up. Same goes with chimpanzees who will only do it if they get a treat. But among autistic kids is there altruism? It is a test of human subjects and my professor says it cannot be done due to ethical reasons.. Thank you.
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Gdday. An individual with autistics may need to reestablish responsible care taker with more productivity activities of interaction that will improve their cognitive ability to smile, counting, coping skills, eating, cooking, jogging and reading as well as singing. All these may demonstrates social and physical environmental health upbringing role in their life.
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In most contexts, the terms alternative medicine, complementary medicine, integrative medicine, holistic medicine, natural medicine, and unconventional medicine are almost synonymous.
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Everyday more patients seek non conventional approaches to their non resolved medical problems. Many of these approaches are safe and recommended by credited physicians. At the same time, conventional medicine discredits this therapies because of lack of demonstrative clinical studies.
I believe many non conventional therapies should be includes after judicious consideration, and serious clinical studies should be performed when a positive balance between (good) efficacy and (low) risk is perceived.
In this way, many today’s innocuous, non conventional therapies could precede more aggressive mainstream therapeutical approaches.
Two main factual problems should be taken in consideration:
First the lack of clinical studies comes from huge imbalance between private pharmaceutical funding and that of non conventional therapies. This brings up the ethical question: Is clinical research really at patient´s service or at the service of pharmacology?
Secondly, I believe that not only "scientifically" proven medicine acceptable. Good clinical sense should always come first, based when necessary but never exclusively on clinical studies. In this sense, we must remember that most of our conventional practice is based on "accepted" opinions and not in the so called "science”. Many of the cases because of obvious reasons ... nobody is refraining from performing CPR to a arrested patient, or ventilate a patient in critical respiratory failure just because no randomized, double blind, controlled studies were made to demonstrate its efficacy in that particular situation.
As a consequence my position is to approach non conventional medicines as an opportunity rather than as a problem.
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In the final chapters of the global review of all parenting practices titled "The Anthropology of Childhood: Cherubs, Chattel, Changelings" the anthropologist David F. Lancy lists a set of core differences between all modern and all traditional parenting practices.
I'm neither anthropologist nor family psychologist; so, I have a question for professionals in these fields (just out of curiosity, not for research).
Question:
Is it possible to consider the following list of compared particularities of parenting practices as a comprehensive set of components for building personal parenting style adapted to different circumstances of living in different parts of the second world where traditional and modern cultures are merged in all possible combinations? Or maybe this list does not cover some particularities of child psychology and some particularities of parents-children/society-children relationships?
Here is the list extracted from that book of David F. Lancy. It is summarized and rewritten with my own words to highlight the sense of my question in a better way. (Items that are specific for extremely traditional third world societies were not included because they do not relate to my question.) Speaking figuratively, with this list I'm trying to "formalize" and "digitize" the term "parenting style". Each item of the list may be expressed with some number as you can understand. And I would like to understand whether such "digitizing" approach is reasonable or not.
Thank you.
The list:
1. Priority of child's wellbeing in comparison to priority of wellbeing of other family members.
2. Amount of value assigned to newborns.
3. Age when child is considered as a a thinking human.
4. Amount of protection placed on children against the adult world.
5. Fertility rate.
6. Family structure.
7. Amount of unique home environment created especially for children.
8. Age when mothers stop nurturing children actively.
9. Age when intellectual stimulation of children is started.
10. Amount of children's participation in household duties and caring of younger siblings.
11. Amount of grandparents' involvement in childcare.
12. Amount of father' involvement in childcare.
13. Intensity of toddler rejection.
14. Amount of using services of professional child-caretakers.
15. Amount of relying on scientific works in the process of parenting.
16. Amount of reliance on formal schooling in passing knowledge and cultural values.
17. Amount of efforts applied to socializing children through conversations and amount of interfering with children's autonomy. 18. Amount of toys purchased for children.
19. Amount of adult interfering and guidance in children's play.
20. Amount of tolerating the aggressive behavior of children.
21. The level of strictness of gender roles applied to children.
22. Amount of value given to children's play.
23. The balance level for children between being recipients of care and being active part of the family/community.
24. Presence and level of adolescent-parent conflict and "typical" adolescent problems; length of the adolescent period.
25. Amount of teaching provided from parents to children.
26. Interpreting "happiness" as a normal condition of children.
27. The balance level for children between "learning by doing" and "learning by listening lectures".
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Yes, I agree with Stephen. Traditionally, childhood was considered to be a preparation for adulthood. Children were integrated into family life to be "socialized" through contact with adult models. Today, childhood has been idealized, and an entire industry has sprung up to create a world of food and entertainment devoted exclusively to them. Adulthood (with its attendant responsibilities) is no longer perceived as a goal towards which we strive, but rather as an unwelcome and intrusive "dose of reality" into an otherwise perfect world. We bemoan the loss of our innocence and the carefree lifestyle of our youth, and are encouraged to rediscover our "inner child."
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i want to explore the changing food dynamics of consumption and prioritization habits during and post Irish famine. How famines affect the food supply chains and distributions throughout, ultimately forcing consumers to substitute or include a variety of different nourishment, from an anthropological view
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Have you read Alexander Somerville's "Letters from Ireland during the Famine of 1847" - he makes many observations on agriculture and the local economy as he travelled throughout the country from Feb to April 1847 which you might find useful.
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I am to study, a particular caste among Scheduled castes in Bihar, I am facing methodological challenge to frame the research. Please suggest me some methodologies to conduct an unique study.
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I suggest that you read Louis Dumont's work on Homo Hierarchicus: The Caste System and Its Implications (1981).
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I need you help Can I get Contemporary Marketing Book?
the book details is :
Contemporary Marketing And Consumer Behavior An
Anthropological Sourcebook
by John F. Sherry 1996
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Try this: Marketing theory evidence practice, 2nd edition, Byron Sharp with contributions from lots of other people.
The book is research-based, and the theory contained in it is explanatory. It starts by making consumer behaviour the basis for marketing. It's practical and down to earth, and written in a way that's easy to understand. Good luck
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Comments on cannibalism by homo sapiens during times of economic stress or survival efforts are indeed very interesting...We know that modern man can and will resort to this tactic to keep alive. Other societies have used cannibalism for other reasons as to capture the bravery or memory of the dearly departed. The ritual use of this topic may make for some dynamic research.
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"Progress in all branches of science has enabled us to discover not only the immensity but also the fecundity of the historical progress. In that way we have become more fully aware of the extent and the dept of the social bond".
What do you think about?
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Many thanks for your answer. El-Sayed El-Aswad, Science is not Ideology or much better is NOT supposed to be Ideology.
The definition of Science is: "The intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behaviour of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment". https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/science