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Does the Beat movement of the 1980s differ in characteristics from that of 1960s?
The beat voice has subdued in the 1980s as the major members of the movement either passed away or grew old. And there is also perhaps the change in the audience's taste in a context in which much of the countercultural practices and attitudes of the 1960s were more or less normalized; like pornography, sexual liberty, the growing recognition (and recent empowerment) of the queer community, drug-taking, attitudes to traditional religion and spirituality.
But I wonder if anyone could pinpoint stylistic or ideological evolvement in the 1980s beat movement. I'm specifically interested in Allen Ginsberg.
Thanks for sharing ideas!
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Anti-imperialist Poetics involves issues of politics, identity, the self and the Other, and resistance among other topics. However, the amount of research done in this area seems to be not as wide as it may be expected (please correct me if you think otherwise).
So how much freedom do western academics really have in researching such areas that criticize the political history of their own nations? How willing are these researchers into investigating a topic that would present their countries in unfavorable lights? I'm asking from a literary studies view point, having American poetry in mind in particular.
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Anti-imperialist poetics has been a hot topic for the past ten years if you include post-colonialist theory as being anti-imperialist. And then in 2020, the black lives matter movement, which spread from the United States to many other places throughout the world, may be viewed as an extension. Post-colonialism pits the imperialist, primarily Anglo European, nations against nations in the African Continent, Asia (including India), and the Caribbean archipelagos. Currently, I am working on a study of the African American and Afro Caribbean poet Derek Walcott, who won the Nobel Award in Poetry in 1992, which was a breakthrough because he is the first black man to win this award. The following year, in 1993, Toni Morrison won the Nobel Award in Literature as the first black woman. Thus there is a shift from anti-imperialist poetics as more black poets and writers are achieving national and world-wide recognition for their work. Because this is a global movement away from anti-imperialist poetics toward post-colonial recognition. Certainly, the grass roots efforts of militant black panther activist novelists led to the curricular revolution in which standard courses in classical Greek and Roman literature and British literature have in the United States gradually been eclipsed, first by courses in American literature, and more recently, courses in African and African American literature, world literature, feminist theory and literature, and literature in interdisciplinary contexts. Since America is a democratic nation and literature is taught oftentimes in historical contexts, the idea you present of subversion is typically avoided by the objectivity factor. In other words, for example, the Middle Passage is a fact of history and a vast storehouse of slave narratives and other forms of non-fiction and fiction writing are an integral part of American history, culture, and literature, knowledge of which is a matter of scientific fact. Moreover, times have changed and codified laws have been enacted. Moreover, if a black professors teach black poetry, this obviates the notion that they are trying to subvert the contemporary national government and its people. Traditionally, the grievance has been that white professors were teaching courses in black and minority literatures. Admittedly, however, in recent months, I have observed a controversy rising about something with which I am not familiar, which is critical race theory. So I leave it to others who are knowledgeable to discuss this issue.
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Literature is not a documentary. However, biographical traces do exist in many literary works. Apart from depicting "real" events, experiences and characters, can we consider the feelings or emotions associated with these experiences as biographical traces, even though authorial factors changed the original events that instigated these emotions?
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It is important that you consider the genre of the novel that you have at hand.
A testimonial novel, a autofiction, or a historical novel tend to be based on 'true' facts or biographical data of the author.
Even in the testemonial novel, the biographical lie is totally condemned. Do you know the story of Binjamin Wilkomirski's novel Fragments? See: https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/1999/oct/15/features11.g24
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What sorts of things does imaginative literature teach us? Is imaginative literature a luxury or an essential aspect of the human experience? Should the teaching of imaginative literature be included in educational curricula as a required subject, or, at least, an elective?
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It is a simple fact that everything we feed is growing. And a second simple fact is that we only become to know what we are able to believe in. So it is very important to deal with imaginative literature to feed our Imagination!
The process of becomming able to to things is: Conception (Imagination) followed by perception, followed by action(radius).
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I'd appreciate suggestions for modern American poets whose poetry reveals preoccupation with their own image as individuals; a preoccupation with individual identity in which, for example they extensively use "I";
something reminiscent of Emily Dickinson's and Theodore Roethke's metaphysics and imagination.
Thanks!
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Karl Shapiro might be a good candidate. Although many of his poems are in third person, he has several poems that attempt to frame his own identity: "I am an atheist who says his prayers," for example. And the collections Poems of Jew, Bourgeois Poet, and White-Haired Lover. He is well known as an iconoclastic poet, and he is often iconoclastic with regard to his own identity and position.
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I am planning to apply textual network analysis to Poe's short stories on perversion to try to determine a basic pattern.
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Although E.A. Poe was the child of actor parents, was unfamiliar with the theatre. However, it is generally admitted that stories like "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "The Cask of Amontillado" have all the qualities of a good play.
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The list of writers fascinated with sport is long (Frost, Malamud, Nabokov, etc.). Please give any ideas that come to your minds.
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Baseball is often read as the defining element of US's independence from the European tradition. It is widely used in the contemporary novel as a metaphor for some uniquely American political and individual thought - for baseball in US lit, and sport more widely conceived, see Coover's Universal Baseball Association, Roth's Great American Novel, DeLillo's Underworld, Mailer's The Fight (boxing), Wallace's Infinite Jest (tennis).
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I am doing research work on the writings of William Faulkner and thinking of adding a Faulkner novel to my course on Law and Literature (probably Requiem for a Nun)
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Eric, if you go for Requiem for a Nun, it would be just perfect in your field of study. Best wishes.
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I currently work on MA thesis which discusses the influence of European existential thought (Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre) on American literature. As an example I provide the novels of Ernest Hemingway where I will depict existential themes.
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Check out the online article on
EXISTENTIALISM IN AMERICAN NOVELS
Also
Existentialism and the American Novel
Jean Bruneau
Yale French Studies
No. 1, Existentialism (1948), pp. 66-72 
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T.S. Eliot is famous for his use of symbols. He has used symbols in every piece of his work. How does he use symbols in his monumental work The Waste Land? 
Sibaprasad Dutta
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Eliot’s symbol of perpetual life appears first in the epigraph as the ancient Sybil who cannot die, and again, perhaps, in “The Burial of the Dead” as “Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks” (“She is older than the rocks among which she sits ...” runs Pater’s description). She is the woman in “The Game of Chess,” surrounded by “her strange synthetic perfumes” and on whose dressing-room walls hang the “withered stumps of time”—the artistic record of the mythical past (“... and all this has been to her but as the sound of lyres and flutes, and lives only in the delicacy with which it has moulded the changing lineaments, and tinged the eyelids and the hands”). And she appears, finally, in “The Fire Sermon,” where she draws “her long black hair out tight,” while bats with baby faces in the violet light Whistled, and beat their wings And crawled head downward down a blackened wall (“... like the vampire, she has been dead many times, and learned the secrets of the grave”).
-- Thank you
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I am embarking on a post-doc project (which might entail a conference and a collection) and would like to find out if anyone shares its interests (particularly in Germany, but also beyond).
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Alexandra
studies on alienation and irony could be conducive to a deeper understanding of such  concepts ,  I am teaching cross cultural studies , let me know if I could be of any assistance.
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I am collecting data (articles, papers, criticism) for a monograph study about William Wharton (Albert du Aime, 1925-2008). So far I have found next to nothing (a handful of reviews, some obituaries etc.) - is anybody able to help me?
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A detailed description of the project is available here: https://www.academia.edu/358921/William_Wharton._Sketches_from_Memory
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Maurice A. Lee's Writers on Writing: The Art of the Short Story is an example of the kind of books that include a whole series of essays on a special topic, in this case short story, but what I am looking for is a book in which an analysis of the work of the masters is presented. I look for a book, not necessarily anthologies, where I can simply find good recommendations to read, study, or maybe translate.
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There is no comprehensive study of the short story as a genre. Modestly, I can direct you to my blog may-on-the-short-story.blogspot.com on which I have been posting essays on the form for the past five years.  My books Short Story Theories and "I Am Your Brother" have pretty extensive bibliographies.
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I am currently analysing Edgar Allan Poe's stories using SNA in order to weight the importance of symbolic elements in groups of stories. Anyone doing something similar?
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Thanks Mr. Drago for your information. I have downloaded the article successfully and I will surely enhoy reading it. I was wondering if you yourself have any experience in the topic of SNA for literary works. thanks again.
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Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace.