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When we compare algal diversity based on group which graph could be used better to represent the diversity among different Class...
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Can any one suggested an author processing fees free research journal for publishing the algae related work...The journal should not be a predatory one.
Example: comparative study on algal diversity in three different study sites.
Thank you
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Journal of Coastal Research
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Hello, can somebody help me to identify this specie of Chlorphyte? I find it in a reef in front Veracruz and I think it´s a Caulerpa, but I am not sure.
Thank you for your help.
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This is more likely Caulerpa mexicana. Caulerpa mexicana has branchlets that are not constricted at the base, and a flat midrib. Caulerpa taxifolia has branchlets that are constricted at the base, and a compressed but not flat midrib. Caulerpa mexicana is also more common in the Gulf of Mexico.
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I am working with some strains of cyanobacteria isolated from Zimbabwe's Manyame catchment - I want to extract their genomic material so that I may use it to confirm their identity. In my lab I do not have the capacity to buy DNA extraction kits so I have to use other means. I tried to use the CTAB method but failing to get good results. May I have some options which I can try with my samples.
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Can anyone help me to identify two species of Codium found in Sayulita, Nayarit (Mexico)? I made a cross section to watch the utricules in an attempt to identify them using a bibliography but I still found it difficult.
The dark green one is A)
The light green one is B)
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Rafael Martín Martín
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For example, it is reported that Dunaliella tertiolecta has 36–42% of lipid production in dry weight (dw), while strains like Nannochloropsis can be 46(31–68)%dw, Schiochytrium can be up to 50–77%dw?
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Dear researchers,
I am trying to isolate this blue green algae which came as weed into my another culture. this has a basal heterocyst and trichome tapering towards end. I feel this could be Microchaete violacea Fremy (Desikachary 1959) member of Rivulariaceae. i could not see sheath clearly and i didnt find any intercalary heterocyst.  please do comment.
thanks in advance
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i think it is Rivularia spp .according to heterocyct basal location .
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salam alaikum
is this Raphidonema?
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It´s very similar  a Raphidonema longiseta
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I have been working on samples of Ostracoda from Great Britain caves. I have this specimen identified according to Meisch (2000) key as F. latens. But the size is only 0.5 mm, all other characteristics fits with species description.
Could I be wrong?Thanks
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Thanks Chiara and Susanne :)
I will contact them.
Best wishes,
Nataša
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Hi all! I am working with green macroalgae. To see the variation between two population in the molecular level, I had performed basic RAPD work which showe variation in the bands. Based on this I proceeded with the sequencing of the rbcL region. Not much could be interpreted with the results from rbcL. Can somebody tell me how to proceed further to understand the variation between the subspecies
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HI Perumal Karthick, I am working on the family Characeae, mainly on the genus Chara and Nitella, which are commonly available in India.
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I would like to calculate a copy number of genes in Gymnodium catenatum, and I need to know it's genome size.
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Thank you  Jackson..
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Cells are 3-5 μm and the mucilage is red. 
Collected in western Canada
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Dear Natalia:
I think that your specimens are Gloeocapsa sp. Gloeocapsa has several species with wide gelatinous sheaths, concentrically lamellate (lamellation distinct or scarcely visible),intensely or partly coloured by sheath pigments (gloeocapsin, scytonemin), yellow, yellow-brown, orange, red.
Kind regards.
Eugenia
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I am looking for the gene sequence of above mentioned genes. Plz send the gene sequences Or else plz suggest me the way to search the gene sequences. 
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Thank You sir (Mr. Vrajesh Patel). I will al ways be grateful to you.
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Hi all,
These algae (1000x mag) were found as a gelatinous light-green "blob" (no other species within it) in a river in Tasman, NZ.
Thank you
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The colour of the chromatophores point to a species of chrysophceae or xanthophyceae.
(1) Chrysophceae--Chrysococcales-Chrysococcus or Phaeosphaera, see Starmach: Süsswasserflora von Mitteleurop, Vol.1, pages 417-419.
(2) Xanthphyceae--Mischococcales-Bortyochloris, see Ettl: Süsswasserflora von Mitteleurop, Vol.3, pages 264- 266.
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funny photo today that act as scorpion 
please help me to know about cyanobacteria and micro-algea .
thank you doctors
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Reham: Does your microscope have the blue/green and the green/red cubes to induce and to observe Chl a and Chl b fluorescence? In my understanding, you have a mix of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microalgae, and  fluorescence  tests will help you discriminate these groups. IB
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Dear Researchers,
When I went Andaman and Nicobar Islands i visited some of the locations as a tourist still i didnt had permission for collection i took photo of some of the seaweeds. just posting it here so that i can get knowledge on these seaweeds.kindly identify these and provide some informations regarding these algae.
kindly confirm my identification also.
1. Caulerpa recemosa
2. Boergesenia forbesii 
7,8,9. Acetabularia
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Picture one looks like the holdfast of Caulerpa serrulata
Picture one is of Boergesenia forbesii and you see Neomeris annulata in the background
Pics 3-5 looks like a species of Dictyosphaeria
Pics 7,8,9. look like Acetabularia acetabulum
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My friend sent the short film to me saved as attachment for mp4 format (the file was 1.47 MB). Could someone help me to identify the algae in the short film ( the target algae was the stripped and moving one with a little transparent, not the green tiny circular one)? The  sample was taken at the bottom of shrimp culture pond. Thank you!
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It´s a nice film of a cyanobacterium belonging to the order Oscillatoriales, a filamentous non heterocytous group. It´s possible to see the rows of granules on the cross wall, but to be sure about the genus it´s necessary to know the diameter of filaments  and the lenght of cells. Célia sant´Anna
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Does anyone know these soil algae? They are isolated from biological soil crust in Bremen, Germany.
In the figure, there are 4 species (Non-Gel A1, 2; Gel A1, 2). The left one in each row shows their morphology on agar plate. In the microscopic image, I notice that they have different cell size. Algae (Gel-A1, and A2) both produce 4 daughter cells, and they have gelatinous colony on agar plate, while Non-Gel algae have flat colony. Scale bar stands for 10 um in the figure.
Can phycologists provide me any information from these algae? Like the genus they belong to?
This is a part of the research within my Master program. Thanks in advance~
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As Harold C. Bold of the University of Texas and his students discovered, more than four decades ago, time and patience is required using microbiological techniques to classify soil algae.  I would recommend the 12 publications by the University of Texas as your starting point -  published under the heading “Phycological Studies” from 1960 to 1974.   The Botanical Review paper by Metting cites most of them.  
Metting, B. 1981. The systematics and ecology of soil algae. The Botanical Review 47(2):195-312. 
Phycological Studies--VIII. The Taxonomy and Comparative Physiology of the Chlorosarcinales and Certain Other Edaphic Algae 
Phycological Studies--XI. The Genus Chlorococcum Meneghini 
I believe several of the Chlorococcum-like taxa that were isolated from soil continue as unialgal, axenic culture and available for purchase at the University of Texas Algal Culture Collection with some also shown as photomicrographs.    
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it was found in the temporary water body.the alga is 8 celled colony which has common cell wall. is it Gloeocapsa sp. member of Chroococcales.
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Dear Elaya,
I think you are right it should be a species of Gloeocapsa  from Chroococcales since it is a colony embedded in a matrix within a common sheath. I would suggest to take better and clear images  for confirming the species.
May refer :
1.Süsswasserflora von Mitteleuropa, Bd 19/1: Cyanoprokaryota: Chroococcales (by Jirí Komárek and Konstantinos Anagnostidis)
2. Cyanophyta,T. V. Desikachary,
Best regards
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Chlorophyceae, Algae, Periphyton,  Cochin estuary
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It´s difficult to be sure that the material is Oedogonium: the  typical ringlike caps are not visible and neither the pyrenoids . It´s necessary to look for these so common and evident morphological features  in Oedogonium. Good luck, Célia sant´Anna
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Dear Researchers
 I found this organisms on Roadside stagnant waters. which was forming a floating bloom. they are motile, colonial green algae with eyespot. there i could find two sized colonies weather both sized colonies are same genus or different.or the stage of life cycle. i also want to know about their reproduction method (gametes). 
How to differentiate Pandorina and Eudorina?
In each genus what are key characters are there?
does these organisms are used in pollution indicator index?
i guess these are indicator of organic pollution, is it right?
please help me in identifying the species of these..
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Dear colleague!
You have both genera in your sample. i.e. Eudorina spp. and Pandorina spp. 
Eudorina spp. - colonies always motile, spherical or slightly elongate, of 16-32-64 cells lying some distance from one another and arranged to form a hollow sphere near the periphery of the homogeneous, hyaline, gelatinous envelope. Cells spherical, with or without a beak at the point of origin of the two cilia.
Pandorina spp. - colonies composed of 8, 16, or sometimes 32 cells, held together at their bases to form a sack globular colony surrounded by mucilage. The cells are ovoid or slightly narrowed at one end to appear keystone- or pear-shaped. Each cell has two flagella with two contractile vacuoles at their base, an eyespot, and a large cup-shaped chloroplast with at least one pyrenoid.
Best wishes
Bohuslav
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Moroccan Atlantic  and Mediterranean coasts.
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I found this green algae in a freshwater pond. which is highly motile moving very fast by rotating its whole body.its looks like it has flagella.sometime feel it might a green alga because i feel the chloroplast has some definite shape. to my small knowledge on algae i could not identify it. since i got only less material i could not take more photographs..only this photos and video,.. i have nothing more.
kindly help me in this regard..
I have attached one video which shows the motile stage of alga. 
thanking you in advance.
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Dear Elaya:
I coincide with Grant. You clearly have not a blue-green algae by two reasons, Cianobacteria has not chloroplasts (your specimen shows two chloroplasts in the secon picture) and has not flagellate cells (your specimen has flagella).
More clear pictures would be necessary for determining your material, but your pictures are sufficient for be sure that your materia are not blue-green algae.
King regards.
Eugenia
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Hi, I discovered an algae which seems to be a new species (for sure has not been sequenced yet). I already sequenced the total 18S, the rbcL and part of the 25S. None of these gave a unique BLAST result.
With 18S and rbcL I made phylogenetic trees using different algorithms (NJ, MP, ML) and they located my strain between the Diplosphaera and  the Stichococcus genera. Also the morphological data (cell form, binary division...) support such trees. 
Do I need also physiological and ultrastructural data to make a publication? Or more sequences (ITS)? 
Up to know I didn't find any recent studies dealing with characterisation of new strains.
Thank you
Luca
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Diplosphaera and Stichococcus have been placed in two different families, so either the families need revision, or one of the sequences to which you have blasted is misidentified.  Diplosphaera is the most cryptic genus - just a little coccoid that reproduces by autospores and can form small compact colonies because it undergoes desmoschisis as well.  Stichococcus is a simple elongated coccoid with cell division in one plane.  They are really different.  Because both are asexual and produce no zoospores, there is not a lot of life history to work out.  The chloroplast structure of both is very simple as well. there are Stichococcus species that are not very elongated (they appear almost spherical).  I have not seen your phylogeny, but I suspect somebody may have sequenced one of these subspherical Stichococcus and called it Diplosphaera by mistake.
A book you could check out for morphology of green coccoids is Ettl and Gaertner (2014 - earlier first edition is fine). Syllabus der Boden-, Luft- und Flechtenalgen.  Actually, Georg Gaertner lives in Innsbruck, only 1.5 hours drive from Bolzano.  he is retired, but still active, and friendly.  You could contact him and see if you can go up and show him your alga. He has described green coccoids, and could give you very targeted advice.
Good luck with this.
Jeff Johansen
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They are  living (M1, M2 and M3) and also lugol-fixed (M4 and M5) and belongs to a reservoir.
Thanks in advance
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Thanks for your answers (the brown colour is not real, they are fixed with lugol!!)
I was also using Komarek 1983, I was thinking in some Genus like Neglectella, Oonephris, Eremosphaera, ........... or Glaucocystis
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It is fixed with lugol. And it is a reservoir sample
Thanks
Maria 
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This does not look like an alga.
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 If you have any published information about its geographical distribution references thereof will also be highly appreciated.
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Can some body help me to identify this algae?
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Daniel:
Sharply focused pictures needed for reliable identification.
Best
Syed
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Identification
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yes, it is the species of Closterium
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Dear Researchers... I have a doubt in identification of two taxa in Micrasterias. M.crux-melitensis and M.radians. These two sp. were similar in their morphology and varies only in dimensions. Can anyone know the key character which differs these two sp.? Thank you all in advance.
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Dear Elaya Perumal,
Thank you for your detailed answer and sources. The two species look same and various authors had discussed their morphological complexity. Anyway, I will consider your answer. Thank you once again.
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In order to do an experimental approach, we would like to use a substrate that is as equivalent to a natural substrate usually colonized by diatoms (calcareous and silicate-calcareous mix) as possible. In specialized bibliography we have found that artificial sandstone and glass-slides on bricks were used to this end, but wondered if there was any other method I am not aware of. We would also be thankful for any further publications on this subject you could recommend.
Thank you very much in advance.
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I used to use unglazed floor tiles. (in the US these are sometimes called "unglazed quarry tiles" although I think that the more generic name is terra cotta tiles). They provide a standardized area which makes quantitative analysis much easier and they are relatively inexpensive and easily obtained. If you use the extruded ones then you have a choice of either the smooth, flat top surface or the ridged bottom.
If you do a google search on "periphyton  quarry  tiles" you should be able to see a whole bunch of research pubs that have used these.
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I am specifically asking about Thalassiosira. I've been looking everywhere for a reference, but I'm at a loss. Is this just an assumption that has never been tested? Is this a safe assumption? Am I just missing the reference that exists before there were online sources? 
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Many planktonic centric diatoms produce chitinous fibers from the valve face fultoportula to attach with sister cells. The sister cells are produced during normal vegetative growth of a population, asexual mitotic division. As indicated in the previous replies, this can be done to form larger colonies to slow sinking rates or in attempt to avoid herbivory.
Chain forming most prominently occurs in centrics and araphids. Again this process is thought to occur during mitosis since the centrics and araphids lack a method of mobility. some mobile genera, Eunotia and Nitzschia, have been observed forming rosette colonies. They may be seeking each other out to form colonies, but are more likely formed form mitotic division as well.
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Hi all,  
Can anyone help me to know the present status of research on Charophytes in India ??
Regards
Shiva Nedle
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look at studies by V. S. SUNDARALINGAM
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It is look like a leaf under microscope, but it could be a plankton. Earlier I heard that it was a ciliate, but I didn't get this picture again in my samples. This too found in Bay of Bengal waters. Please help me to identify this specimen.
Thank you.
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looks in first instance like a scale from a butterfly or a moth.
Best wishes, René
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recent keys of course, please
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Tank you very much
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Can anybody help me identifying the microrganism of this colony?
Thank you so much
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I didn't find any Scenedesmus colonies in the picture, only unicellular organisms are visible.  Further it is better to isolate one or two unicellular structures and take the photograph.
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It is a freshwater desmid generally found in lakes and reservoirs
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I would vote for Tetraedon as it looks like more irregular and polygonal than Staurastrum. Furthermore, on this picture, there is no visible isthmus/constriction in between the two semi-cells (=taxonomic feature of Desmids).
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I have collected some algal  samples from the walls of the  local region. I have noticed the presence of Pandorina species along with Stigonema, Phormidium, Gleocapsa and Trentepohlia.
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Please examine under microscope and tell your result 
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I found this algae on Jeddah coast, western Saudi Arabia, Red Sea, can any specialist help me to identify this alga?
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Dr. Ammar,
It looks like Turbinaria conoides (J.Agardh) Kützing.
Vaibhav A. Mantri 
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Sample was from mountain lake in Ukraine (april 2015, under ice).
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Larisa,
 look like some simple Difflugia. But needs to be measured and from different points of wiev ! Look, please, some articles about Vorochevo lakes and Svidovets lakes from my site, altitude about 660 m, and 1400 m. I studied it enough well, but hardly to identify from this photo. Testate amoebae needs to see their oral form and collar< important is if flattend body, some "neck" like Pontigulasia. Can ask Volodia Pliashechnik from Uzhgorod (he has site) or if need perfect qualification call Prof. Vassil Golemansky. Anyway perfet key of mazei & tsiganov in Russian. i made the very good PDF, just put for smbd like reply for question.
important if this lake has some water flows in & out. if no, will be like swampy area with special faunal list...
Andrey
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Does anybody know this "slimy" organism? Growing on very wet tufa (Cratoneurion community) in Swiss Prealps. Algae? Cyanobacteria?
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It is looks like Nostoc (N. commune maybe) or some heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, but for better identification you need a micro -photo. 
Best regards
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Today different wavelengths has been chosen to measure diatom optical density. Right now more and more articles select 625nm wavelength to estimate Phaeodactylum tricornutum dry weight. Does anyone know the reason to choose 625nm instead of 750nm or 600, 680nm? Or if you have any good recommendations?
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besides Chl a, Phaeodactylum  is kown to contain chlorophyll c, fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and β-carotene .  Hence the wavelength  625-630 is preferred  over other nm 
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In my Spirulina platensis culture i found below types organisms or contamination could anyone tell me what is this?
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There are several species of similar appearance. For example, algae genera such as Acanthosphaera, Galenkinia, Golenkiniopsis or Chodatella come into question, but also further genera are possible. As you might know, the appearance can also change depending on growth conditions, developmental stage, cell densities and other factors. In addition, there is no size information on your images. To obtain morphological details you would need a much better image quality and a much higher resolution (electron microscopy). Getting physiological or ecological data would be helpful but it is a laborious thing.
Nowadays, the best way to unambiguously identify a species is DNA barcoding (using for example ITS-2 regions). 
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Water samples were taken from an estuary (Salinity: 15 ppt) and brown colony formed in the agar plates after 4 weeks of plating. Photographs taken at 40 X magnification. Size of the cells: 8-15 micron 
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My dear, this seems to be a fungus.
My greetings.
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I was able to isolate this organism in a soil sample. 
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I would say it is Chlorolobion braunii (Näg.) Komárek - a green alga.
Kind regards
Sanet
 
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I want to identify few sea algae and sea grasses for my research. I've checked online but various sources are sowing various description for the same species. Can you suggest me some credible sources? 
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Dear Subas,
You may use the following sites
The Seaweed Site : www.seaweed.ie/australia/
AMANI (Australian Marine Algal Name Index)
You may also refer the book Seaweeds of Australia.  Iona G. Christianson, Margaret N. Clayton, Bruce M. Allender. Reed, 1981
Good luck!
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It was found in a siliceous monomictic reservoir. Size of the algae: 3,38µm and it has some warts or protuberances...
some idea about de genus?????
stratify reservoir
secchi disk: 4.75m
Temperature: 26.50
pH: 8.69
alcalinity: 88.70
Thaks in advance for your help
Maria 
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Thanks to Ana Negro who find the solution:  spores of fungus!!!!
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The photograph (At 40 X magnification) is of an isolated colony of a microalgae from a brackishwater lagoon (Salinity: 15-20 ppt). The size of one cell is around 8-10 micron. 
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There are countless spherical, unicellular algae species of this size and appearance. To obtain any morphological details you would need a much higher resolution (electron microscopy). Getting physiological or ecological data would be helpful but it is a laborious thing. Nowadays the best way to unambiguously identify a microalgae species is DNA barcoding (using for example ITS-2 regions).
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Hi everybody!
I have collected this seaweed in the intertidial rocky shore of Ancash (north central coast of Peru). Does anybody have a suggestion about its genus or species? (I know I have to do microscopic observations but any idea would be nice!)
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Definitely it is a red alga (Rhodophyta) as Razy Hoffman and previous answers said. But with this fragment only it is very difficult to identify which species.
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It was found at 8 mt depth. Is it a Mediterranean species?
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Dear Armando:
I think it is an species of Codium, it is similar to C. decorticatum, which type locality is the Mediterranean Sea. Check if the thallus is spongy, with an external palisade of vesicles called utricles.
Good luck with the determination.
Eugenia 
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How can I get a complete identification key of Zooplanktons ?
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It depends on the zoogeographical region, freshwater or brackish or salt. General keys are based on the most typical (in author's opinion) species. In first approximation such general keys can be used, but you should support tham by specialised keys, e.g. with regional or world fauna books. In post soviets countries f. ins.  when identifying Rotifers we use normally perfect Kutikova book, when have to do with Chidoridae – Smirnov Fauna of the world (1971) (in Russian). As well, Cyclopoidea by Monchenko, Harpacticoidea by Borutzky etc. So, you should define more accurately you interest.
Andrey
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I did streaking again and again but could not get the pure strains. Its still clonal culture not the pure strains. I also know the dilution method. Can it be possible to pick the strain under compound microscope or dissecting one ?.
Any one can please suggest me some best ways to isolate the pure strains from colonies of bulk microalgae?..
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Sorry, I do not agree. A clonal culture is by definition a culture started with one single cell. the only way to be completely sure of this is if one materially isolates and propagates one single cell. The serial dilution technique does not give you the same certainyy, since it relies on the probability that if  you dilute successively a sufficient number of times  a culture where your target species is dominant, eventually only one cell will end up in your test tube (or well, as it may be the case). So, you rely on a statistical probality, but not on absolute certainty. Once said this, I agree with the fact that serial dilution is easy, cheap and effective, but I never dared to define my cultures isolated with this technique as clonal.
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Dear Researcher Friends,
We have some Anabaena strains in our collection but I have not managed to induce their akinete formation so far. Do you think, now I have akinetes under our microscope?
Kind regards,
Nandor
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Hi Nandor!
Yes, the cells indicated with narrow are akinetes.
Best wishes
Bohuslav
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can you help me with classified the following genes:
cymbella: Long= 5, Width=1.25
                long= 4.25, width=1
Amphora: Long= 5.25, Width=2.25
Achnanthus: Long= 5, Width=1.75
Nitzschia: Long= 5, Width=0.5
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Often diatoms especially planktonic taxa undergo size reduction due to increase in phosphorus and drop in silica
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What are all the morphological differences between Spirulina platensis and Spirulina maxima microscopically?
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Comparison of an authentic
isolate of S. platensis from Chad and of S.
maxima from Mexico, grown in the laboratory
under identical conditions, showed that S. maxima
is characterized by a diameter of the helix of
50 to 60 p.m and pitch of 80 pm; values >35 to 50
p.m and 60 pm, respectively, were observed for
S. platensis. On the other hand, cell dimensions
were greater in S. platensis than in S. maxima
(diameter, 6 to 8 p.m in the former and 4 to 6 p.m
in the latter) (97). The cytoplasm of the smaller
species appears homogeneous, with no gas vacuoles
or inclusions and scarcely visible septa.
On the contrary, the larger species such as S.
platensis and S. maxima have a granular cytoplasm
containing gas vacuoles and easily visible
septa. (Ciferri 1983 Spirulina, the Edible Microorganism)
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Is there anyone that can tell me the genera and/or species of of this algae?
They are from mid-Permian of South China, which was located around the equator.
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May the attached file help you.
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rhodophyceae member 
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You will need to provide a photomicrograph to have any hope of an identification.
I agree regarding Porphyra being marine and obviously not correct. Someone wasn't paying attention to that 'freshwater' part.
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I have isolated and purified a Green algae which was confirmed by its chloroplast 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. It is showing 85% sequence similarity with one of the existing algal type culture which is a nearest neighbour (NCBI). What genetic markers are actually used for taxonomic delineation of algal (eukaryotic) members. Which databases are to be used for their actual identification. Which journals accept the taxonomic paper of algae. My isolate is found to be genetically, physiologically, chemotaxonomically different from the most of the existing algal members. Please advise me regarding this.
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In addition to mentioned above:
Marker: Internal transcribed spacers of ribosomal cistron (ITS1 and ITS2).
Journals: Journal of Phycology, BMC Evolutionary Biology, PLOS ONE
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It may be found epizoic on the soft margins of Acanthochiton sp. or epiphytic on some macroscopic algae
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Based on  the Photograph it may  be Bangiopsis belongs to Rhodophyceae which occur above the midlittoral regions of the intertidal rocky surfacfaces. During the winter season if forms mat like structure on the rocks ( I have seen in our region, India).
Lower one may be a blue green alga associated with Bangiopsis
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We are going to develop a software for drinking water plant technicians to identify phytoplankton.
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 Thank you, Anila. This is a good review on the principles and methods for alga recognize. Although it is not easy to get an ideal solution, the paper gives us a direction to go.
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It is known that more then 72 species were found in te Gulf of Gdansk (Danziger Bucht) in 1907 (Lakowitz, 1907). But I Think That not all this species are lived along the coast of East Preussen. 
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Hello Mr. Kautsky. Thank you for the answer. Some Information about our region (Kaliningrad region) we (Alexandra Volodina and Marika Gerb) reported in this book (Check list, 2012) from our field investigations (Gulf of Gdansk, Russian part). It was interesting for me to know historical data about this region (the begining of XX century) from the Lakowitz, 1907. As I understand this book did not include the information from East Preussen. Have anybody the book of Lakowitz, 1907? 
Good luck!
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Algae
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It may be Caulerpa  scalpeliformis . As no record of mexicana in Indian waters.
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Zooplankton organisms should be important indicators of the general functional conditions of aquatic ecosystems.
 I’ m interested to collect recent data (published or not) about inorganic (metals) and organic (PCB) contaminants in marine zooplankton
Thank you in advance
stefania
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Hi Stefania, the chapter about copper contamination and plankton community that I told you was just published. You can access the entire book here: http://ecologia.ib.usp.br/reservatorios/ or if you have interest for the chapter, I am send to you a copy, but it is in Portuguese.
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This plant is very similar to Nitophyllum punctatum, but has microscopic veins, which N. punctatum normally doesn't have. In addition, the tetrasporangia of N. punctatum up to 175 µm in diameter, whereas this specimen never exceeds 65 µm. Can you help me to identify this species? Please find images attached. 
Thank you.