Science topic

Advocacy - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Advocacy, and find Advocacy experts.
Questions related to Advocacy
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
13 answers
Are student governments or student movements better at enacting policy change?
Some other aspects to consider:
How do these two concepts overlap? How are they different and how are they similar? What are some examples that would help provide answers to this question?
Relevant answer
Answer
Student unions the world over have often been a political force to be reckoned with – not least when the core issue at stake is the cost of higher education. In 2010, for example, the UK's National Union of Students managed to rally tens of thousands of students on to the streets in opposition to the Westminster governments plans to triple tuition fees in England while other countries – such as South Africa – have also seen their fair share of protests over fees from student groups. However, these days some student unions seem mired in an endless culture war stand-off with minsters over free speech, while in the UK and elsewhere others are questioning whether the shift of student interest towards single-issue campaigning has made such organisations irrelevant...
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
4 answers
Dear community of researchers,
I am currently working on a small research project that will explore community- and patient-led strategies for increasing referral of diabetes and hypertension and raising awareness of these two diseases in Mozambique, a highly resource-constrained country.
I would like to ask:
- does anyone have knowledge on patient-led referral strategies and advocacy activities? If so, could you please share any relevant links and/or are you aware of any recommendations on this from international health organisations?
- do you believe that involving patients in such activities would be ethically appropriate? Why/ why not?
Thank you in advance for any replies.
Regards,
Chiara
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you very much Jehan for sharing your perspective, that is very helpful.
To be more clear, with "referral" I referred to the identification by T2D patients of individuals with risk factors for T2D, such as being overweight and having excessive thirst or urination, and their referral to healthcare professionals.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
19 answers
Globally, we are producing more food than ever. But for many of the world’s poorer citizens, secure access to safe food is becoming less certain. To counter this, an advocacy programme called Sustainable Diets for All is asking: how can we create food systems that are fairer, healthier and more sustainable?
Relevant answer
Answer
A sustainable diet takes into account the impact it will have on the environment, the individual, and the food chain as a whole. Factors that determine how sustainable a certain diet is include: nutritional availability. relative cost.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
9 answers
Which method could be more appropriate? quantitative or qualitative? or mixed methods?
Relevant answer
Answer
Merajsadat Malakouti I think you can go for both but I prefer qualitative because you can get more interesting insights, often more revealing than quantitative data but I think it also depends on your skills, your personality and what you want to examine.... Im in to psychology and Quantitative research is for me less rewarding since there are certain things you can not measure or you will struggle to find a method/methodology in order to measure...If I want to know the average height or shoe size of women I probably go for a quantitative study but if Im interested in the deeper questions I would most certainly go for qualitative. Within the research community there are people who are in favour of on or the other but try to find your own voice, your own style and also match it with what you want to examine. Good luck...best wishes :-)
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
28 answers
There is an interesting COPE case "Author of rejected paper publicly names & criticises peer reviewer"
I have a dilemma. A journal has invited a non-researcher, a member of an advocacy group to review our paper in which, among other things, we criticize this person's "publication" because it contained clearly incorrect information. This reviewer has focused only on defending the "publication" and not provided a single suggestion about how we could improve our paper. The paper was rejected although the other reviewer provided several suggestions about how to improve the paper, which we were willing to do.
We appealed to the journal and they response was that they don't agree that the reviewer has a serious conflict of interest.
We strongly disagree. What should I do now? Can I do anything about it? I want to make this public but this means I must reveal the name of the reviewer. The journal explicitly forbids that. Does anyone have any advice?
Relevant answer
Hi Igor, just because someone has done something wrong, you don't have to do it as well.
First of all, reviewing is voluntary work, no one gets paid for it. He/she spends time to read a few times, take notes and provide a critical review. When he/she submits a paper, others might reciprocate their action.
Secondly, if a journal fails to invite a qualified expert in a particular domain of research, it is wrongdoing from the journal's point of view. That said, standard research journals wouldn't resort to this sort of review. A mostly cheap open-access publisher who charges fees and gets the reviews done quickly might resort to this type of review.
Thirdly, an ethically and morally motivated person will disclose the publisher that he/she cannot review a particular reason as they have a conflict of interest. It is a self-imposed action.
Fourth, it is up to the reviewer to share how much opinion that he/she wants. Some provide very helpful and constructive comments (e.g. major issues / minor issues) that they see in a paper. They have the right to do so! (Refer point #1)
Fifth, a journal can reject a paper without even sending out for review at the editorial level. It depends on the impact factor and the rejection rate. An author may think that their paper might be appropriate for the journal they submitted, the editor may decide otherwise. An author cannot question the journal at this stage. They just have to look options elsewhere.
Sixth, for a reviewing expert, the reviewer doesn't have to accept all the writing/interpretations of the authors - hypothesis/theory/opinion/findings. No two reviewers might have to agree to each other. The reviewer has to be convinced in the way in which the paper is written. The paper has to address the positive and negative aspects of their paper (e.g. limitations of the study). The authors have to find a sweet spot and make compromising decisions.
Seventh, the study authors can supply the names of opposing reviewers (e.g. the names of people who they don't want the paper to be reviewed by). Usually, they adhere to this request. However, the may or may not adhere to all the potential reviewers. This is because the names could be biased.
Eighth, the forum hears on your appeal with regards to the reviewer's conflict of interest. However, we are hearing one side of the story. We might not make an informed decision about who is right.
Ninth, anyone can make a mistake - the authors, reviewers, or editors. There might be an inherent politics built around a journal. It needs to be either explained or negotiated. If the escalation doesn't work, just move on with another journal. Manuscript rejection is part and parcel of academic life. Every researcher knows about it. It is not a big deal at all. You don't have to spend sleepless nights over an issue that doesn't even deserve it.
My advice would be - JUST MOVE ON!!!
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
62 answers
Today, advocacy is increasing with the use of e-learning platforms to increase the risk and spread of Corona virus, does this mean that there is a possibility of replacing the teacher in the near future? We know that education depends on senses and attention!
Relevant answer
Answer
I do not think so.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
3 answers
Currently, many of the feminist revolts and demonstrations are being considered a party or celebration even by the protesters themselves and belonging to the movement. This causes many people to mark these important dates as 8M as one more holiday instead of a date to seriously claim for women's rights.
Relevant answer
Answer
Isn't it better to have this type of atmosphere rather than anger and violence? Evidently, when there was a panel talk for International Women's Day (8 March) about women in art: 'Brutality and the female body: how can we reinvent female flesh', those getting to the event early were handed Bloody Mary cocktails!
Parties (maybe not too many cocktails!) and festivals rather than brutality and hate? As long as the message gets across.
It maybe isn't appropriate to mention the difference between the sexes, but do you think the lack of testosterone has something to do with women's events having this type of atmosphere? Surely more women are going to be attracted to getting involved in feminism if they do not encounter negative vibes when they join?
Panel Talk for International Women’s Day at Sarabande Foundation
About this Event
Brutality and the female body: how can we reinvent female flesh?
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
4 answers
Some PR scholars don't consider advocacy as a PR strategy in activism or social change programs. What do you all think about it?
Relevant answer
Answer
Public Relation may or may not involve Advocacy. Similarly, the spectrum of advocacy range from individual to system-wide or global in scope. Public Relation would be at least more than an individual advocacy effort?
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
1 answer
currently, I am trying to test effects of corporate reputation and customer satisfaction on customer citizenship behaviour. customer citizenship behaviour is measured using 4 separate constructs that is "helping other customers", tolerance towards the firm", "advocating for the firm" and "providing feedback". I have run the CFA and SEM and in SEM the model appears to be not good unless I add "helping other customers" as a mediator between independent (customer satisfaction and corporate reputation)and other dependent variables (Tolerance, Feedback, advocacy). my thought is that there is another variable that is similar to " helping other customers" that actually mediate between all these. such as Empathic or altruism traits. My question is how to deal with such results, given all four dependent variables are supposed to make a second-order construct that is customer citizenship behaviour.
Relevant answer
Answer
If, as you mentioned, there is a reference of conceptual similar variables and theoretical frameworks to your varibale mediator that fulfill that role, and you have some study that supports that, you can propose the mentioned mediation analysis, if your objective is based on fulfilling only the predictive model you can consider to remove some item or factor that does not adjust to the model or also correlation of covariance error in the model according to the modification indexes.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
25 answers
Phd. Student, I am in the stage where I outline my research questions and research methodology. Thank you in advance for your support!
A clarification: the chosen theme is the process of social innovation and social entrepreneurship in Romania. What interests me about the research question is its structure, the best way to formulate it.
Relevant answer
Answer
Firstly, research questions are outlined in the introduction part. Then you should change questions into hypotheses if you test them
If not
You can outline them in a part of methodology
Or you can also write them in a seperate title.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
5 answers
I am looking for studies or papers that have combined the ACF with critical realism or who have realigned the ACF so that it fits critical realism (or at least tried to do so).
Relevant answer
Answer
I don't know if it could fit your question, but an alternative approach to ACF is the discourse coalitions framework (refer to the work of Martin Hajer and following development). This framework surely follows a critical approach, whereas in concerned with power and hegemonic practices, but it rely on a constructivistic, rather than realistic, ontology.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
3 answers
While some scholars argue that the ACF is based on (neo) positivism, others note that it is actually post positivist.
Relevant answer
Answer
It seems more like a pragmatist epistemology.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
5 answers
Greetings everyone and I first would like to thank you for the advise...
I am interested in the intersection of social media and science research, education, and advocacy.
-I am working on a citizen science project and wanted to see if anyone had any advise or projects/papers that they could recommend to me.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi David,
My colleagues and I launched many citizen science projects in Taiwan in recent years, and we are good at using social media (most on facebook) to share our results and interact with thousands of participants. If you were interested in, questions and suggestions are very welcome.
Here is a pamphlet regarding our projects on birds.
Thank you so much!
Cheers,
Dali
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
3 answers
The Daily Mail has its own Turn The Tide On Plastic campaign and sees itself as thriving mayor force against plastic pollution. The Daily Mail Online frequently publishes articles promoting its own campaign’s successes.
The Daily Mail Online is the third most read website in the UK (after BBC News and The Sun Online) and the fifth most used website with the purpose of reading news in the UK in 2018.
Can that still be labelled as advocacy journalism?
Relevant answer
Answer
The Daily Mail has own Turn The Tide On Plastic campaign as sees itself as thriving major force against plastic pollution menace in whatever environment on earth. This means that the publication is practicing the social responsibility of the press or the media as it sets the agenda by priming plastic waste issue.
At this point, the campaign is vital for a variety of reasons. Among them is to create, raise, and sustain public awareness of the social, economic, political, and ecological or environmental damage and loss caused by plastic waste pollution.
As you said, The Daily Mail Online frequently publishes articles promoting public awareness campaigns and it regularly evaluates it’s own success stories.I think, one of the most critical issues about public communication campaign, has to do with assessment or evaluation of the campaign progress.
You also said that, The Daily Mail Online is the third most read website in the UK only after the BBC News and The Sun Online, as well as, the fifth most used website with the purpose of reading news in the UK as observed last year, in 2018. The media are very influential in effecting personal or individual behaviour as well as policy change at all levels of our society from local to global .
The issue of media advocacy communication campaign evaluation is highly recommended for professional, ethical, and investment reasons regarding the effectiveness or efficiency of the campaigns.This means that the current or the ongoing media campaign has been well planned and implemented so far.
The media practitioners or journalists especially science or environmental reporters or journalists are trained to do their jobs professionally and they usually look at the different environmental problems that should be addressed.
As the world now focuses on Climate Change effects or the need for urgent climate action as stated in the UN SDG 13, one of the biggest single issues of human factors that can be or has be attributed to drive climate change is, waste.
This means that you have raised a very serious question or comment in particular. I thought your remarks were as informative as curious, to say the least. I am also sure that, with respect to the previous word, your sounds very brilliant, informed, professional, educative, or in tandem with your personal beauty. Be blessed.
Best regards
Wilson
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
10 answers
For those working in the medical field or aware of reliable medical YouTube:
What YouTube channels reflect Evidence-based medicine (EBM), what is example of these channels to suggest for patients?
If you can also specify what medical specialty that YouTube channel got and if other languages are available, that would be even better.
Thank you for sharing your insights to support patients and their families!
Relevant answer
Answer
The discussion is very nice and my information improve. Thank you my good friends.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
4 answers
There are many explanations about the links between Employee Advocacy and Personal Branding but only in the managerial literature ?
I don't find any research article on this topic.
Thank you for your help.
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
38 answers
Leadership skills include patience, self-control, active listening, conflict resolution, empathy, advocacy and much more.
Relevant answer
Answer
I think, Angela, the more emotionally mature the leader, the more nurturing capability she or he would have. Is it a trait that can be developed in children? Perhaps some, but not all. Instead of looking at blanket training response to all children to improve nurturing, I think you really have to look at the causes of bullying, and maybe use a training response (within a training course) that would address each cause. I've thought from the beginning of your VERY interesting questions, that it might be useful just to get a sense of what psychologists do to treat the different types of problems that kids who bully have. That could help lead you in a training direction. Careful!. I don't mind crossing these boundaries between fields, but others might!
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
4 answers
Examples would include Partha Chatterjee's argument that the poor in the global do not really form part of civil society as the state treats them as populations to managed for their well-being rather than citizens bearing equal rights. Instead the poor are adversely incorporated into rule through political parties and patronage in 'political society'.
Another example is Asef argument that the urban poor often seek to avoid the state rather than engage it to claims rights as they live illegally. He terms this a practice of 'quiet encroachment'.
Both these analyses call the mainstream liberal ontology of state-civil society-citizen into question by questioning (i) the conception of rights-based advocacy of the poor by civil society and (ii) the concept of democratic citizenship respectively.
Can you assist with other examples and theories?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Tomer, I also think the point that Bayat was speaking of non-democratic countries with more repressive state apparatuses is important. So for example, my current work on land invasions or occupation in South Africa suggests that poor occupiers expect the state to try and remove them and prepare to resist this knowing that the state will not become too violent (usually). The strategy is not only to move as many as possible and build shacks quickly but also take furniture and children to up the costs of the state removing the shacks. Some have use the terms 'rebellion of the poor' (Alexander 2010) or insurgency (Holston 2008, Pithouse 2009) to describe this, but I am not convinced that the poor imagine themselves as democratic citizens asserting rights. At least not entirely. Hence my interest in alternative theories.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
4 answers
Many countries in the world have attempted to define, what quality Urban Design is; by emphasizing the key concepts and showing a way forward for formulation of strategies and designs based on the key concepts.
Specifically Australia and New Zealand have prepared 'Urban Design Protocol' and encouraged organizations to commit to ‘Good Urban Design’. In New Zealand the Good Urban Design is encouraged by being signatory to the protocol. Being a signatory for an organization is a voluntary but after being signatory the organization should advocate Good Urban Design. In Australia the protocol has worked on partnering organization and encouraging for advocating Good Urban Design.
On other hand CABE in UK has taken up advocacy role to propagate quality Urban Design. The CABE experiment offers lot of potential for non-regulatory framework of implementing Good Urban Design.
Many European countries and other developed nations also have their own ways of implementing Urban Design and enhancing its quality. However, Many developing countries have adopted general broad level Development Control Regulations (DCR) and within that just an enabling clause allowing authorities to frame special regulation for public realm, buildings in notified district etc. and the features like façade, material, fenestration, awnings etc. Few isolated examples of Urban Design advocacy can be seen in New Delhi by means of ‘Delhi Urban Arts Commission’. Where the major public projects in New Delhi like education institutions, mixed use development, business districts etc. are approved by the commission on merit of design of public realm.
I am keen to know similar examples for other countries like Germany, The Netherlands, France, Italy, US, Brazil, China, Japan, Russia. The document I am looking is not case specific design guidelines/guidance but Regulatory Framework or Planning Policy or any other Governance Tool.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello,
Here are some sources that can answer some of your questions or guide your thoughts.
Best,
- Jaeger, Alfred M., and B. R. Baliga. "Control Systems and Strategic Adaptation: Lessons from the Japanese Experience." Strategic Management Journal 6, no. 2 (1985): 115-34.
- Andrews, Kenneth T., and Bob Edwards. "Advocacy Organizations in the U.S. Political Process." Annual Review of Sociology 30 (2004): 479-506.
- BLAIR, THOM. "HUMAN FACTORS IN URBAN PLANNING—8: ADVOCACY PLANNING." Official Architecture and Planning 34, no. 2 (1971): 131-34.
- Campbell, Heather, and Robert Marshall. "Professionalism and Planning in Britain." The Town Planning Review 76, no. 2 (2005): 191-214.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
4 answers
The Diocletian’s palace in Split is known to receive management decisions, which have represented the developing process of heritage management world wide. From stylistic restoration and demolition of postantique structures that didn't belong the the Roman Period, until Riegl's ideas to keep buildings that contributed to the image and harmony of the site.
Is there any other significant example elsewhere that shows the debate or conflict between the domination of historicitized image of a heritage site in a town, and the advocacy of layered-historical complexity?
Relevant answer
Answer
You can look at the Classic city of Bosra (Dera'a district-Syria), where the local population settled on the antique ruins were displaced to better enhanced the cultural heritage and follow the preservation sheme according to UNESCO. The site inscription goes back to 1980, when less care was given to add local population and local economy to the cultural heritage's sites management. But the same, even more radical, cleaning-up can be seen actually in the 2015 UNESCO site of Amida-Diyarbakır, where the inner buffer zone was nationalized and the majority of the "modern" buildings destroyed. We will see what will be done on the antique substract, or what remain of it.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
5 answers
Carer Systemic Advocacy analysis
Relevant answer
Answer
I guess it depends on what kind of mental health advocacy is under consideration. In England we have a statutory right to advocacy, organisations with this dedicated role, and a quality assurance mechanism to ensure that organisations claiming to provide advocacy are indeed doing so. There is more at http://www.qualityadvocacy.org.uk/
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
5 answers
- discussion of different approaches to specific kind of engagement.
- discussion of engagment within advocacy of education
Relevant answer
Answer
I cannot say anything about engagement anthropology, but as far as history is concerned, advocacy is not a task for historian. He is not called upon to defend a cause at any cost, distorting even a truth known to be against the client. The historian needs to be more of a judge, who takes into account all the evidence available / accessible and pronounces a judgement.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
5 answers
Engaging with youth is no longer an option: the "Millennials" are a growing constituency that pushes an increasingly coherent agenda. The newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals represent an unprecedented opportunity: they acknowledge youth, address issues that are of particular concern to young people, and invite updated approaches to youth engagement. How might the energy, creativity, and skills of "Millennials" be leveraged to co-create positive change in policy; advocacy and campaigning; programming, monitoring, and accountability; communication and research, etc.?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think one of the practical ways of engaging the youth towards the realization of  the SDGs is first of all through mobilizing   sensitizing them  on the SDGs first of all. This is necssary because many youth are engaged  primarily in the daily business of survival and have no time to think of global issues. Consequently if strategies aimed at involving the youth includes prospects of lucrative employments they are most likely to give their total commtiment.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
4 answers
I would like to conduct a case study at a human rights organisation in Kenya. This is to assess their M&E system and look at what methods are in use,what challenges they encounter and best practices.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Lionel Angote,
It is an interesting area. However, your question is not specific enough to give you an exact answer. I hope your requirement is to do an organizational assessment on advocacy. I would like to share IPPF ADVOCACY CAPACITY ASSESSMENT TOOL developed by Chris Stalker on October 4th 2012. Hope this will help. Good Luck. Suchira
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
10 answers
Compulsory voting is not a new concept, either theoretically or in practice. Currently, 22 countries have laws for compulsory voting, but they are not enforced in 11. The practice creates a legal obligation for a citizen to vote in elections.  If one fails to vote, he or she may be subject to punitive measures, such as fines or community service.  
Recently, US president Barrack Obama brought public attention to "mandatory" voting by advocating the practice.  He has defended his advocacy with an argument based upon expanding the electorate in the interest of greater democratic legitimacy.
Voter turnout in the US is quite low compared with turnout in other mature democracies.  Chronic nonvoters in the US are disproportionately poor, members of minorities, and in general, socially disadvantaged.  It is argued by Obama and others, that compulsory voting would increase both the size and diversity of the active electorate.
On the other hand, if voting is a right, then to simultaneously make it a legal duty, creates a moral contradiction.  Hannah Arendt, influenced by Socrates' position in Apology, argues that the right to participate politically entails a person's right not to participate in any way whatsoever.
The comments above suggest but a few of the important issues in democratic theory and political participation raised by the debate over compulsory voting.
(Please see my article, "The Moral Problem of Nonvoting".  The pdf is attached below.)
Relevant answer
Let me share this interpretation of Hanna Pitkin on political action in Hannah Arendt work: Political action "Implies a realistic perception and acknowledgment of Both self and world, of one's power and one's situation. Its genuinely means, competently taking responsibility for one's conduct, its consequences, and the norms and standards that govern it "(Pitikin, The Attack of the blob, 1998, p. 182). I have an interest in studying the vote as means of political action. Your article helps a lot. Thank you for sharing your interesting article.
  • asked a question related to Advocacy
Question
3 answers
Any studies which reference measures taken or tools in the field I may not have heard of? I'm interested in evaluating the impact of qualitative (i.e. hard to quantify) measures, usually things like advocacy work which is difficult to assess. How do you tease apart effects well enough to close the gap on causal inference?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think it would depend a bit on the theory driving the intervention and where the anticipated changes reside. Using your example of advocacy, if changes reside in individuals within the community, you might take one approach. If they are at a system or societal level, you might use another.
A few references might include:
You might also use approaches from other domains (e.g. knowledge translation or policy) depending on what your desired outcomes are. Although it's public health specific, the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools might be helpful: http://www.nccmt.ca/ or the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy http://www.ncchpp.ca/en/
-cam