Science topic

Adolescent Development - Science topic

Adolescent Development is the continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.
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Our lab is conducting a research project about Asian-American families. We are investigating Asian-American families' well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically, their experience of racial discrimination, their parent-child relationships, and their children's development. So far we manage to contact churches, organizations, and school communities, but we still need more Philippine and Korean teenagers (12-18 years old) and parents to participate. Any suggestions to help us recruit? I appreciate your help.
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One way is to go through the schools. A common approach is to reach out to the superintendent of the district with your IRB approval, summary of study, and that you are seeking support/permission. Once granted, you would then reach out to individual principals of schools in those districts to get their support. At that point, you provide the students at the school where you have support an informed consent and permission letter to take home for parents. If the parent consents, you may even schedule a call to address any questions or concerns they might have. Once you have consent, you then can proceed. Good luck.
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see above
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Very important subject
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Need to raise awareness about early puberty, which is a current problem among adolescent girls. It makes the parents to panic as they fear of about unwanted consequences.
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Important subject
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I would like to understand the procedures and methodologies behind a Q-sort.
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Should the number of columns in Q methodology be odd?
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Edit: Thanks everyone for your contributions to the discussion. I think it's helped my clarify the focus of what I was asking better. Specifically, I am interested in how can we support youth wellbeing if their ability to interact with PEERS is constrained because of social distancing protocols. What are some protective factors or strategies that can make up for deficits in social interaction with peers at this time?
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Original question:
There are a lot of articles in the news about the detrimental effect of the pandemic on children and youths' mental health - the main argument is always around the decrease in opportunities for social interaction with their peers. While I don't doubt that social interaction with peers is a developmental milestone for adolescents, I do wonder to what degree this emphasis on PEER interaction specifically is culturally bound?
In western cultures, kids generally go to school and are sorted by age and grade and therefore interact primarily with their peers. But in some cultures this type of sorting is not predominant. Also, what about children who are homeschooled? Who live in rural areas? Who are only-children? There are variety of scenarios where children don't have as much interaction with kids their age. What do you think, research community? Is PEER social interaction, the kind they would get at school, essential to child and adolescent development? Or is social interaction in general, regardless of age group, the essential part? Can you point me to any interesting reads in this area of study?
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Of course, I absolutely have to answer YES! It is an essential stage in the socialization process and, therefore, essential for the psychosocial development of adolescents and to achieve adequate PSYCHOSOCIAL MATURITY.
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What are the cognitive, emotional, and social consequences of media use at all stages of childhood and adolescence development?
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poor attention and concentration in academics, sudden anger, sadness, poor socialization, and so on.
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The global pandemic has hit hard on families from different angles. The economic, religious, political and other aspects of society have been shaken and disrupted. Technology has now an even more significant and central place in our lives.
Children have also been greatly affected by the various disruptions in social life, school schedules, etc.
How are we cushioning them against adverse effects of these disruptions on their mental wellbeing?
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The parents are cushioning their children from adverse effects of the covid pandemic by sparing quality time, discussing their issues, and having healthy discourse on their personal and professional life. Even then the children are devoting more time with their parents, but they still miss their friends, school-life and outdoor games. To further cope up with the stress caused by these factors, the parents need to be quite patient and composed to deal with any kind of mood swings, irritability, and impulsiveness displayed by their children. It is a very tough time for both the parents and children to adapt to changing lifestyles. However, we should always focus on our mental health and well-being. Certainly, some kind of Yoga, exercises, meditation, Ayurvedic medicines, Herbal and home-made healthy food items have made our children stronger to deal with the adversities. We need to learn to manage disharmony and restore the balanced lifestyle.
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In the course of work-from home for more than a year, a work done completely at home needs institute affiliation or home's address ?
How this works for the early stage researcher's who are very mobile ?
Do you have any idea of how it may impact the following -
What are Health effects ?
How it effects sustainability ?
Is there any study on growth impacts ?
What about energy and environment ?
How it impacts the ecology and environment ?
How it impacts the local economy ?
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Omkar S. Kushwaha , I believe even young researchers should have an affiliation; they should follow a certain institution or company, otherwise, how are they supposed to get ethical approval and fund for their research, if that is solved, then there should be no problem in working from home, if this can be done.
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Please -- I am seeking examples to illustrate the misunderstandings and related failings (simple and otherwise) that undermine projects and interventions on the topics of conservation, natural resources and development (with a focus on the tropics). The idea is to gather and explain examples to students. We often say that we learn from our mistakes ... but arguably we can all learn from each other people's mistakes too ... if we share them
Despite hearing many quirky stories it is hard to find examples in publications on conservation, natural resources, development etc. Surely there are plenty of examples in peoples experiences though!
There are important examples from wider topics in the wealthier world. For example, how paying blood donors as an incentive to increase donations, can decrease blood donations (as donors prefer to give), and how fining parents for collecting their children late from school has in some case actually increased the number of children collected late (as parents felt less guilty when they paid for it).
An example from my own work would be my earlier efforts to frame a project in Papua (Indonesian New Guinea) around the poorest people and then discovering that people in Papua find it offensive to be called "poor" (this concept cannot be used to motivate projects there).
Anything is potentially useful. I am especially keen to identify publications or cases that can be otherwise sourced and cited--though personal communications are welcome too. Anything fun, quirky or educational is especially desirable.
THANKS!
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Hi Dr. Sheil, maybe this paper could be relevant: https://www.pnas.org/content/117/39/24188
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Hello everyone,
I am looking for a perspective measure that is appropriate for adolescents. I am familiar with measures such as The Silent Film task (for children) or the Strange Situations (for autistic population) or Faux pas test, but most typically developing adolescents/adults excel these tasks.
Any recommendations will be appreciated.
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You can check the curse of knowledge task (the violin of Vicki). It is the adult version of the standard false belief task (unexpected location task).
Birch, S. A., & Bloom, P. (2007). The curse of knowledge in reasoning about false beliefs. Psychological Science, 18(5), 382-386.
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I am analyzing a dataset. There I have a group of participants whose age range is 10-17 years. I have their gender, date of birth, height and weight. I want to measure their BMI for age, z-score and percentile using WHO guidelines. WHO provides "Anthro Survey Analyser" to calculate these but in the default format, it can calculate the BMI for the age of under 5 years children (0-60 months) only (both in online anthro tool and offline anthro software).
So, how can I calculate the BMI for age, z score, and percentile of 10-17 years age group children using WHO Anthro Software or Online Survey Analyzer?
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Can anyone please guide me about how to interpret the subscale scores for the Parenting Stress Index (Esp the parental Dysfunctional subscale). Any guidance will be much appreciated!!!
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Payal Sood hi! can you send me the copy of the manual?
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Hello all!
I am in need of some expertise on adolescents developing brain, the role of substance use and co-occurring disorders. I would appreciate some literature or general expertise from those who research in this area!
Thank you in advance. :-)
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I believe you are referring to issues of comorbidity disorders. Comorbidityis the presence of more than one disorderin the same person. This typically consists of having, a mental disorders (any number of mental disorders), for instance, and substance abuse, or even issues in gambling. It must be an issue of metal health disorders, disorders that often contribute to a substance abuse issue or issues related. Think of comorbidity as a someone having a static issue and one of a dynamic issue,which can be changed through time (poor relations with family or friends) and/or with treatment. My co-authors and I mentioned this in The effect of parental support on juvenile drug court completion and postprogram recidivism, which can be found in Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 10(4), 354-369. For further help, please see the three research articles provided below:
See the below article for help:
Krohn, M. D., & Wellford, C. F. (1977). A static and dynamic analysis of crime and the primary dimensions of nations. International Journal of Criminology and Penology, 5(1), 1-16.
Alarid, L. F., Montemayor, C. D., & Dannhaus, S. (2012). The effect of parental support on juvenile drug court completion and postprogram recidivism. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, 10(4), 354-369.
Hall, W., Lynskey, M., & Teesson, M. (2001). What is comorbidity and why does it matter. National comorbidity project, 11-17.
Respectfully,
- CDM
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I am making an assignment for introductory, 101-level Child and Adolescent Development class. Assignment requires reading a literature review on a topic related to child and adolescent development - really any general concept (range can be from effects of breastfeeding to early literacy interventions to effects of corporal punishment), has to be very recent and easy-read (not complex metaanalysis that might be too confusing for freshman level). Did any of you recently read (or wrote and had published) one?
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great resource
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I'm a first year graduate student and am interested in observing environment gene changes in the xenograft mouse model for prostate cancer during mouse development.
Is it at all possible to inject a mouse pup (1-2 or 2-4 weeks old) with LNCaP cells to see how the developmental changes may contribute to tumor growth?
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I agree with Dinglan on the subject. We run LNCaP xenografts commercially (http://altogenlabs.com/xenograft-models/prostate-cancer-xenograft/lncap-xenograft-model/) and since LNCaP cells are androgen sensitive, is is necessary for the mice to be sexually mature for the experiment to be run successfully. With regards to other factors, 3-week-old mice are fine, but because of the androgen sensitivity, 10 weeks is an early starting point (as we do with nu/nu mice).
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Does anyone know of research into using education (trade training or higher education) as a means to develop self-esteem, positive identity in individuals with PTSD?
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Qualitative research methods in developmental psychology
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You can use quantitative methods but attach a part of free-worded opinions as we did in "impact of..."
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We are awarded a research Grant and planning to adopt DAST 20 for screening the psychoactive substance abuse among school level adolescents in Rupandehi district of Nepal.
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Perhaps you get an idea from this:
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I have been exploring Perry’s epistemological stages of development into adulthood.  The Learning Context Questionnaire (LCQ) by Griffith and Chapman (1982) seems to be the most common quantitative measure.  Unfortunately I have not been able to locate a copy.  Do you have a copy you could share? Are there other existing measures of Perry stages or other measures of how individuals understand truth/knowledge?  Thank you for your help. ~ Kevin
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I believe LCQ co-developer John Griffith now lives in or around Greenville, SC or Charlotte NC. His profile is on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/john-griffith-870b6545/. I corresponded with him several years back and he provided me with copies of the questionnaire. Hope this helps!
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Hello, Colleagues,
I am having some success in mapping a pop cultural fiction phenomenon from small beginnings, to a circle of cognscenti, to a wild upswing in popularity.
There is a dark side to the fiction phenomenon in terms of dealing with human differences. So how can theory help in studying what appeals to the informal reader in this writing and what demographic segment makes use of this writing?
I have posted elsewhere about my case-in-point but now I am just wondering about the mechanics of the transmission and adoption of attitudes. Would cultural studies have theories, anthropology, sociology?
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Hello Gloria, greetings from Germany.
In the field of early European Ethnology , Hans Naumann suggested the theory of "Gesunkenes Kulturgut" in the early 1920s, saying that innovative powers in higher socio-cultural hierarchies create cultural aspects, which are then by time copied and adapted by what was then called "lower classes". Obviously, this theory didn't stand for long, as many examples of modern pop culture show us that culture may be transferred vertically bottom-to-top as well (Jeans, Tattoos, Boots with steel cabs, etc.). But nevertheless it is a considerable idea to begin with. It might also be worth discussing and adapting the Broken-Window-Theory by Wilson and Kelling or the characteristics of innovation diffusion stated by Hägerstrand for your work. Also defining the characteristics of the "Early-Adaptors" in diffusion processes and seeing different mechanisms in "vertical" and "horizontal" diffusion, using cultural expressions to include or exclude, might show a path to how a cluster of theories that might be helpful.
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Dear Researchers,
I took Art Eductaion class years ago and the professor cited studies in childhood development that found that children's art participation dramatically lessens after puberty.
Can you point me to the studies?
Thanks,
Gloria
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I also believe creativity when not sustained diminishes. The interest children have to draw and create go down as the drawing activity becomes more complex.
There are a lot of studies by most child psychologist to give some of these reasons of low interest in children toward creativity. Some of these doctors can be interest of parents, attitude of the society toward people who get employment through creative skills , even school teachers and friends.
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Some teething babies tend to start sucking their thumbs from infancy to toddler's age. If parents didn't care for the proper hygiene of the babies, sucking thumbs can predispose a baby to various diseases ranging from bacterial gastroenteritis, parasitic and worm infestations. How can parents control the problems of thumb sucking in their babies/children?
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folk remedy - to grease a thumb with mustard
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There are people who would like to see the kind of high school-to- industry and business integration of apprenticeship programs.
Are any of our RG community working to bring apprenticeships to the US that are as coordinated with industry and business as those are in Germany?
How can this be achieved in the US?
What obstacles are there to creating such apprenticeships?
Do you have research in this area to share?
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Having served as an educator in the United States and in Europe, I would suggest that we might consider clearly defining the term apprenticeship within the context of the US. For example, there is a legal difference between and Apprenticeship (with a capital A), which pertains to a formal agreement with trade and business organizations (and is protected within US labor law), and informal apprenticeship, and an internship when it comes to High School aged students in the US. If there might be a bit more information I might be able to more appropriately respond as this is an area where I have experience. Thank you for your consideration.
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Children among 6 and 12 years.
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These resources may interest you.
The article "Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents" says:
"...Several well-studied child self-report screening measures for anxiety exist and may be used in patients >8 years of age. First, the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children [33], and the Screen for Child Anxiety and Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) [34], and the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) [35] were developed to be sensitive and specific for assessing anxiety in youth and are useful in clinical practice to monitor treatment progress [36]. The Preschool Anxiety Scale is a parent report adapted from the SCAS that was developed for screening for anxiety in young children (ages 2.5 to 6.5). The SCARED and SCAS are available online/free access.
Second, the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, which is frequently utilized as a primary or secondary outcome measure in psychopharmacologic trials of youth, is a clinician-rated measure used to assess the severity of anxiety symptoms and change over time [37].
Third, with regard to social phobia or social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Scale, the Social Worries Questionnaire, and the social phobia subscale of SCARED are brief screening measures for social phobia/social anxiety symptoms.
Fourth, a set of novel dimensional anxiety scales was recently generated during the DSM revision process to support clinical decision-making and monitoring treatment progress (www.psychiatry.org/dsm5). These self-rated scales can be used for children aged 11 or older and comprise the core constructs of fear and anxiety together with cognitive, physical and behavioral symptoms in a consistent and brief way, using a common template for each of the anxiety disorders [38]..."
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hi.
i need to data set of user profile in social network for my project at amir kabir univercity.
whit this attribute: Gender  Age City University Major  High school Hobby group
like that file i upload
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Azedah, my thinking is that, your project is specific to a certain data required to a dress it.so the data set for its profile should a dress your objectives if I got you right. Your objective should help you meet the out come of your project. I hope my response has shade some light. 
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These two theories appear to cover much the same ground but emerge from different corners of social science.  Social Psychology largely owns social identity theory and has a strong following among European scholars.  In the US scholars of color writing on almost identical topics appear to focus nearly exclusively on theories that are specifically centered in racial or ethnic identity.  Social identity is referred to but not centrally.  How do we bring these two literatures together and can we explain why they have developed in parallel not integrated ways.
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As Daisy says there are several identity theories, some of which are addressed  in social psychology (e.g., social identity theory; ethnic identity theory) and other ones in developmental psychology, such as A. Blasi's self identity theory. Acoording to Blasi's self identity theory when we act morally  we act so in order to preserve our identity. As I see it, social identity theory and ethnic identity theory are, say, theories of beloning. To belong to a social group, such as a political party, or to a given ethnicity such as the white or the black ethnicity. Whereas the former has to do with social identity theory, the latter has to do with ethnic identity theory. In Europe, social identity theory is deeply linked to Henri Tajfel,'s work. Ethnic indentity theory is more related to USA scholars just because in the 60s of the past century ethnic problems were a serious problem in the United States of America. As Blasi's theory might be also considered a theory of belonging to oneself. the three mentioned theories are theories of beloning or partnership. This would be a way of bringing these three literatures together. Why these theories and respective literatures have developed in parallel and not integrated ways? There should be many reasons. Chieflly among them is the endemic tendence of psychology to establish artificial rather than natural fractures and give rise to many theories. If the number of theories were a token of scientic progress, then psychology would be the queen of scineces, which is not the case. Note also that in contrast to the natural sciences, in the social sciences we often step in the face of our predecessors instead of standing on the shoulders of those who have gone before. This partly explains what Paul Meehl (1978), in his seminal article pulished in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, the slow progresso of soft psychology.
Best regards,
Orlando
Best regards,
Orlando
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I am currently looking at how servicescapes enhance or restrict binationals' development of intercultural competence in multicultural marketplaces and was wondering if anyone could aid with articles/ideas regarding this? So far, I have primarily been looking at the physical (Bitner) and social (Tombs & McColl-Kennedy) dimensions in relation to fostering an approach/avoidance behaviour. 
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Hi Subir, thank you so much for this. Looks really interesting! 
Best wishes, 
Mathias
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Hello
I'm looking for a screening test to assess the development of school age children. So far I have found scales that include emotional and social dimensions, however I need a more complete scale, but also brief, which also includes cognitive and behavioural dimensions.
All advice are welcome.
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Ages and Stages Questionnaire (Squires and Bricks) is a useful screening tool.
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published articles that address the subject of impact of development of education on the host community. more specifically how the eating habit of the host community has change due to their interactions with the foreign students.
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@ Tawakalitu Alloh; Thank you for your input. it address some of the issues I am working on. 
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i am writing a essay .i have to write a critical analysis comparing two prominent artists from two different periods.i have chosen michael jackson and picasso using the freudian model which looks at childhood influences, family, moral behaviour, sexual behaviour, neuroses.if anyone could recommend some website that could help me i would appreciate it
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I am currently finishing my PhD dissertation regarding adaptative strategies of teenagers with HFASD in mainstream high schools, in France au Quebec (age 12 to 16). I’d like to find more studies exploring self-perception in high functioning autistic teenagers, mainly regarding academic, social and friendship dimensions. I’d like to discuss my results with the current literature. Thank you very much for your help and suggestions!  
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Hi Morgane, 
here is a link to a fascinating study on teenagers with ASD being overconfident in their self-perceptions of interpersonal skills by Locke and Mitchell (2016).
regards,  
Christian
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Thanks to everyone for sharing with me scientific links related to my topic. 
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Dear Alphonso:
You ask the following: How does teenage motherhood affect the cognitive outcomes and academic achievement of teenage mothers' children? Let me say that this is a nice topic for your MA thesis. 
It is often the case that a question can give rise to a short or long answer. As I see it, James provided you with abundant literature related to your question. My answer to your question will be a short answer. Let me begin by saying that in order to be successful, any parenting and, hence, motherhood, should aim at promoting the child's cognitive, moral and aesthetical development. Note that the true, the good, and the beautiful are universal categories, regardless of how they are seen at different places and times. Unfortunately, schools and families often emphasize the cognitive at the cost of the good and the beautiful. For example, it is often said  that schools and families are much more oriented to three " Rs" (reading, writing, and reasoning) than the three "Cs" (care, concern, and connection). It would be nice of you that your thesis also referred, for example, to how teenage motherhood affects the moral and aesthetical outcomes of teenage mothers' children. Of course , this is not mandatory, only a suggestion. By so doing, you would have a Kantian theoretical framework for your dissertation. Note that Kant wrote three Critiques, one dedicated to the true (Critical of Pure Reason); one dedicated to the good (Critical of Practical Reason), and one related to the beautiful (Critique of Judgment). In this vein, we might say that Piaget's oeuvre is devoted to the scientific study of true, that Kohlberg's theory is dedicated to the scientific study of the good. Kant's Critique of Judgment still waits for being seriously addressed in developmental psychology.
Are you acquainted with Diane Baumrind's styles of parenting, be it seen from the father's or mother's perspective? She conceptualized three types of parenting/motherhood/fatherhood. Authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive, Authoritative motherhood is demanding but warm; authoritarian motherhood is demanding but cold; permissive parenting is guided, say, by the slogan "laissez faire, laissez passer, laissez aller (Let's it go)".
There is amassing evidence that shows that an authoritative motherhood or fatherhood has beneficial effects on the child's cognitive, moral, pro-social, emotional, and aesthetical development. This is not the case of either an authoritarian or permissive parenting. In a  permissive parenting, for example, the child is left, say, at complete darkness in terms of any logical rule, or moral norm. Note, however, that a world deprived of any truth would be illogical and aberrant, and deprived of any moral norm or principle would be unjust and immoral.
I also wonder whether you are acquainted with Martin Hoffman’s classical thinking about the discipline strategies that parents, be they mothers or fathers, appeal while dealing with misdeeds of several types committed by their children in their everyday life, namely at home. More precisely, Hoffman [see Hoffman, M. (1970). Moral development. In P. Mussen (Ed.), Carmichael's manual of child psychology (Vol. 2. pp. 261-360). New York: Wiley] studied children’s moral reasoning and development as a function of the type of discipline strategies parents employ while dealing with misbehavior committed by their children in their everyday life. Children’s moral development was seen in Piagetian terms [see Piaget, J. (1932). The moral development of the child)].As you certainly know,Piaget distinguished moral heteronomy, a morality oriented to the idea of fear, obedience and unilateral respect, from moral autonomy, a more advanced form of morality, a morality guided by the idea of equality, cooperation, and bilateral respect.
Hoffman conceptualized three types of such discipline strategies: Power assertion, withdrawal of love and inductive or explanatory practices. There is power assertion when parents “… try to control the child’s behavior by appealing to their physical power or their control of certain resources…” such as toys, fruit-gums, and the like (Hoffman, 1970, p. 285). (e.g., “if you do that, to lie, for instance, you won’t have toys anymore”. Withdrawal of love is a kind of blackmail in that parents try to control the child’s behavior by threatening him/her with unpleasant psychological consequences, such as, “if you do that -- to hit your sister, for example -- mom does not like you anymore”. Thus, in the withdrawal of love strategy “… parents give a direct, albeit not physical, expression of their disapproval of the child’s transgressions.” (p. 285). Contrary to what happens with power assertion and withdrawal of love, when inductive or explanatory practices are used, parents try to get the child’s adherence by explaining to him/her the negative effects of his/her misdeeds on others (e.g.,” if you hit your sister she will be hurt”).
Among other things, Hoffman found that such discipline strategies or practices were related to different levels of children’s moral development. For example, he found (see p.292) that the frequent use of power assertion on the part of the mother was consistently associated with a low level of children’s moral development, such as is the case of moral heteronomy. In contradistinction, inductive practices were positively associated with the child’s moral autonomy. In a nutshell, discipline strategies a la Hoffman are a good predictor of children’s moral development. As there is mounting evidence that shows that one’s cognitive and social development are a necessary, albeit not sufficient, condition of one’s moral development, Hoffman’s parenting  strategies are also, to an extent, a predictor of children’s cognitive and social development. .     
As far as I know there is no standardized tool to assess both Baumrin's styles of parenting and Hoffman’s discipline strategies. This means that if you want to appeal to such strategies as predictors of developmental outcomes you have to conduct a semi-structured. This is not bad, I think. Actually, psychologists often make use, for example, of standardized like-Likert scales. By so doing, they believe and get the impression – I would say the illusion -- that they are really measuring a certain psychological construct, such cognitive, moral, social, emotional, or aesthetical development. This is one of the reasons why I think that in psychology we should say to evaluate or assess, not to measure. Suffice it to say that, for example, in a Likert-scale the same score (40, for instance) can be obtained or achieved by answering differently to the several items of the scale at hand. The belief mentioned above is greatly responsible for what the Neo-Popperian Paul Meehl once called “the slow progress of soft psychology “[See Meehl, P. (1978) Theoretical risks and tabular asterisks: Sir Karl, Sir Ronald, and the slow progress of softy psychology. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 46, 806-834].
 Note also, that Piaget’s monumental theory of cognitive development never appealed to generally and theoretically ungrounded standardized scales or (mental) tests but rather to theoretically grounded interviews and developmental tasks. To see the difference between mental tests and developmental tasks a la Piaget, note that the former are referred to a quantitative norm, and the latter to a qualitative criterion. In other words, Piaget’s idea was to assess the type of one’s intelligence (i.e., to know better) than the quantity of one’s intelligence (i.e., to know more of the same).
I hope that I have got your points and that this helps.   
Best regards.               
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n/a
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Is this still open? I would be interested myself and am in Zimbabwe
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I don't grasp the concept. For example, if I have a sample n=1000 (that is stratified and clustered) and made three groups of that sample to compare means, is using a regression model enough?
IV is categorical and DV is continuous variable
Does it affect how I choose the groups?Logistic regression is better? If I have two dependent variables, do I use a multiple regression model ?
I am working with a complex survey (secondary analysis) in mental health and I want to know if having a history of ADHD symptoms (IV) can affect QoL (DV) in adults so I have three groups
1. adults without history of ADHD nor current symptoms---> QoL x
2. adults with history of adhd w/o current symptoms-----> QoL y
3. adults with history of adhd and current symptoms------> QoL z
and want to prove if there is an statistical difference between x, y z
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There are different views about the effects of complex sample designs in regression estimation. If, as in the link you provided, you are estimating characteristics of a single population such as means or proportions you should certainly take account of the survey design. For the relationship between variables it rarely makes much difference. Sampling rates will have similar effect on both explanatory and response variables and will have little effect on the regression. You could try using the usual sampling weights and compare results.
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We are validating a questionnaire that we developed, Connectedness to Nature in Early childhood. We tried the PedQL but it did not work: although we believe there should be correlation between CN and PedQL, but may be through health or development first of all. We are therefore looking into using another questionnaire for early development.  Thanks for your help!
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Thank you Wenche, very helpful!
Greetings from HK
Tanja
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Hi, im currently looking for Interaction Rating Scale Advanced,Parent-child Relationship Scale (child self-report),Parenting style and dimension questionnaire,Biographical Inventory of Creative Behaviors,Callous-unemotional scale and scoring (youth self-report) and the scale that about sensitivity to deception.Have any suggestion feel free to advice me. Thank you. 
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Check the mental measurements yearbook....
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I am researching the cognitive complexity of PhD students at each year of the process, and am favouring a specific profile tool, but for robustness, it would be useful to run the students through a second test such as an SJT to determine how they think about themselves in a more traditional psychological test. 
I will be including elements of SJT's in my research, so if I can have students go through them from the start, it adds at least two chapters to my thesis!
Many thanks.
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Hi Darren!
I wonder whether you are acquainted with William Perry's (1970) book, Forms of intellectual and ethical development in the college years: New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. I think that you can profit a lot for your purposes from reading it . Generally speaking, the book presents a longitudinal study in a sample of college students (Harvard University). Perry was able to formulate 9, say, epistemological positions, which consist mainly of 4 positions (stages, levels): Dualism, Multiplicity, Relativism and Commitment. The book also presents a semi-clinical interview to assess those positions.  
What follows is a highly oversimplified outline. I urge you to read Perry's original book and article or any of the other literature referenced at the end of my answer.
William Perry claimed (and his claims have been substantiated by subsequent research) that college students (but others, too) "journey" through 9 "positions" with respect to intellectual and moral development. These stages can be characterized in terms of the student's attitude towards knowledge. The 9 positions, grouped into 4 categories, are:
1) Dualism/Received Knowledge: There are right/wrong answers, engraved on golden tablets in the sky, known to authorities. 
a) Basic Duality: All problems are solvable; therefore, the student's task is to learn the right solutions
b) Full Dualism: Some authorities (literature, philosophy) disagree; others (science, math) agree.Therefore, there are right solutions, but some teachers' views of the tablets are obscured. Therefore, student's task is to learn the right solutions and ignore the others.
2) Multiplicity/Subjective Knowledge: There are conflicting answers;
therefore, students must trust their "inner voices", not external authority.
a) Early Multiplicity: There are 2 kinds of problems: those whose solutions we know and those whose solutions we don't know yet  (thus, a kind of dualism).
Student's task is to learn how to find the right solutions.
b) Late Multiplicity: Most problems are of the second kind; therefore, everyone has a right to their own opinion, or some problems are unsolvable; therefore, it doesn't matter which (if any) solution you choose. Student's task is to shoot the bull.
(Most freshman were found to be at this position, which is a kind of relativism). At this point, some students become alienated, and either retreat to an earlier ("safer") position ("I think I'll study math, not literature, because there are clear answers and not as much uncertainty") or else escape (drop out) ("I can't stand college; all they want is right answers" or else "I can't stand college; no one gives you the right answers".)  Perhaps we evolve into Multiplists after we learn things tacitly and have internal or implicit "feelings" or intuitions about things, but not conscious or explicit beliefs that can be explained or justified.
3) Relativism/Procedural Knowledge: There are disciplinary reasoning methods:
Connected knowledge: empathetic (why do you believe X?; what does this poem say to me?) vs. separated knowledge: "objective analysis" (what techniques can I use to analyze this poem?)
a) Contextual Relativism: All proposed solutions are supported by reasons; i.e., must be viewed in context and relative to support. Some solutions are better than others, depending on context. Student's task is to learn to evaluate solutions. 
Perhaps we then evolve into Contextual Relativists when we can express our intuitions in language and seek justifications for them and relationships among them.
4) Commitment
a) Pre-Commitment: Student sees the necessity of making choices committing to a solution .
b) Commitment/Constructed Knowledge: Integration of knowledge learned from others with personal experience and reflection.
c) Commitment: Student makes a commitment. Challenges to commitment:
Student experiences implications of commitment. Student explores issues of responsibility.
d) Post-Commitment: Student realizes commitment is an ongoing, unfolding, evolving activity. The journey is sometimes repeated; and one can be at different stages at the same time with respect to different subjects.
References:
Perry, William G., Jr. (1970). Forms of intellectual and ethical development in the college years: New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.
Perry, William G., Jr. (1981). Cognitive and ethical growth: The Making of meaning. In Arthur W. The Modern American College (pp 76-116).San Francisco: Jossey-Bass
Belenky, M. F.,  Clinchy, B.; Goldberger, N.R., & Tarule, J. M. (1986). Women's ways of knowing: The development of self, voice, and mind. New York: Basic Books
You can find much material on William Perry's work searching in the Internet. I attach to my answer to your question a file I found in the Internet.
I hope that I have got your answer and that this helps.
Best regards and good luck for your research
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I have gotten a couple tips from a friend who is a counselor who works with children and adolescents in the foster care system. Looking for any more information that will help me create a valid set of questions for minority adolescent urban teens.
To target cognitive domain she suggested a couple possible ways to frame interview questions:
"If there were a speech bubble over your head while you were writing this, what would it say?"
"What are you telling yourself when we do the reflections?"
"What do you tell yourself when you are told you need to monitor another student during the class period to give feedback at the end?"
To target the emotional domain she suggested that many students will still use cognitive language. She suggested the use of feelings wheels of various complexity. She also stated that many students I work with may be more likely to use the word "mad" or "angry" instead of "sad" because one has a connotation of power and one of weakness. 
She also suggested alternating cognitive versus affective questioning sections when I switch participants. I have four areas of inquiry: student thoughts, feelings, actions and attention/engagement.
Can anyone provide interviewing techniques for targeting these varied domains?
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You may want to look at our articles on youth research listed on our website: youthsay.co.nz
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.
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what is CAMI
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I am looking for relevant research papers.
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It would be worth looking at Eleanor Maccoby's "The Development of Sex Differences" (1966) - especially the chapter by Lawrence Kohlberg.  It will give you the base literature on child sexuality and the social context/mediators which are involved.  Fairly easy to find in libraries/on-line bookshops 2nd hand.
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I have recently got the 20 item Likert's-scale of the PACS (Olson) to measure communication between a parent and adolescent. I tried looking for ways to analyse the data but failed. Is there a scoring system to come to a conclusion if the communication is good or not? Currently it just says the higher the scores the better without cut-off points.
Appreciate the input.
Thank you
Arvinder
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Thanks. As I am reading the article, I wonder what you mean by "good or bad communication". The variables seem to be continuous and can be used either as such or to map a family on the circumplex model. Maybe it would be interesting to elaborate more on what you have in mind as good or bad communication. 
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From DSM-III onwards, 'irritability' has been considered one of the child/adolescent specific symptoms for a diagnosis of depression. I'm interested to know how the term is defined, the historical and empirical background for this change, and whether research has been done on irritability as a feature of adolescent depression. Can anyone help?
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Yes, Miyuru…  the anecdotal observations of very young children tell us a lot and we learn about human behaviors.  I have done a lot of observation of children in "play" therapy and it is fascinating to see how they work out different themes.   They will act out a "story" whether they know you are watching or not.  They often need to practice the "attachment" behaviors and if they can verbalize it even with a doll or a stuffed toy that is helpful.  I did notice all the sighs in the one 4 year old.   If a teacher looked at the child she would see the glasses and hear the speech sounds (not always clear) and might dismiss the child  as "not learning"  but when you actually see the child's play and interpret her stories there is so much there -- and it reaffirms the child's individual capacity for growth.  This has been a special interest of mine working with preschoolers and early childhood.  if you want to write an email I am jeanhaverhill@aol.com  (Massachusetts/USA/retired adjunct faculty -- we trained school psychologists) and we had help from Children's Hospital in Boston with the nurse practitioners (in less affluent areas of  MA where we have multi-ethnic populations)
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Hi,
Does anyone know age-group specified in G.H.Mead's 3 stages of Self development in symbolic interaction perspective?
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You can check the theory of Labouvie - Vief (neo - piagetan) point of view. 
  You have many materials. 
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I am focussing on support system,academic performance , behaviour ,stigma ,social skills , economic difficulty ,childhood anxiety and depression ,self-esteem ,peer group rejection ,teachers perception ,current issues ,future risks ,protective factores . ,
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If I can add something- now we have a lot of  methods to measure many of your variables.  But which will be siuted to your research is depend on idea of research (perspective, theory, plan). 
If have contact to the same group - the society to help children from prosoners family - check The open Journal of  Criminology Napadło 
Family Across Prison Walls: a Different Perspective on Incarceration
The Open Criminology Journal, 2015, 8: 24-27
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I am running a research project with adolescents who are diagnosed with conduct problems. I am eager to administer Family Environment Scale (FES) to find out the family environment. Unfortunately, this scale is costly for us. Can anyone suggest me any free alternative of FES. Thanks. 
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Hello Sam,
Oh, I see. In that case, I found a version of the FES, I've attached it, I hope it helps.
Daryn
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I'm Suraj. Currently, I'm a public health student of Institute of Medicine. As part of the curriculum, I need to do research. I'm going to do my research on factors affecting adolescent sexual behavior. So, please help me and give a suggestion.
Thank you
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Maybe this literature review we recently published could serve as a starting point? Or the Zimmer-Gembeck and Helfand review in Dev Psych in 2008?
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Using qualitative methods in psychology to analyze interview data
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I'm not a psychologist, I'm an educator but I am a qualitative researcher.  Here's a couple of my favourite references
Baxter, P. & Jack, S. (2008). Qualitative Case Study Methodology: Study Design and Implementation for Novice Researchers. The Qualitative Report, 13(4), 544-559. Retrieved from: http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR13-4/baxter.pdf  
Johnson, B. & Christensen, L. (2000). Educational Research, Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
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I would like to use this measure in my research but, although I have the original research I can't decifer how the scoring process works. Any help would be useful and much appreciated.
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Thank you, that's what I had thought. All the best Kirsty
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I am particularly interested in making visible the coexistence of diverse transition patterns.
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I would suggest the literature initiated by Arnett with his 2000 publication in the American Psychologist on Emerging Adulthood. 
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I'm looking for any literature that may explain lack of engagement with feedback as being partly explain by the teenage rebellion
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How Creativity tasks be given in oder to reduce anxiety, test anxiety, enhance study habits and motivation of adolescents?
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Here is another article that I believe is relevant to this topic of reducing anxiety and other troubled emotional feelings:
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See above
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Some of the research projects that I have looked at exposed children to two types of movies (e.g., violence-oriented movies and no-violence content movies) to understand the impact. Definitely, the social learning theory, particularly, modeling provides a framework for understanding the psychological impact of movies on children. You could conduct an experiment as suggested by Leow. You do indeed need to define specific psychological factors that you wish to assess.
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I am investigating after-school informal learning opportunities in both face-to-face situations and through mobile learning offerings. The context relates to communities living in poverty where 'cash transfers' are used to affect positive behavior change. I know there is not much evidence from Southern Africa, but wondering what there may be that is not yet published. The interest is not strictly limited to cash (in-kind incentives such as airtime vouchers, or shopping vouchers would be included).
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Thanks this is helpful to know about the Phillippines experience - thank you for sharing with us.
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Hi
I'm hoping someone can help me. In my study I am looking to investigate three dimensions of parenting: warmth, behavioural control and psychological control. I am currently considering the PARQ/control to measure warmth and behavioural control; however, I need a measure of psychological control or an alternative measure that includes all three dimensions.
I am doing an intergenerational study, measuring (i) adults' perceptions of the parenting they received during childhood and (ii) their perceptions of their current parenting practices with their own children. Can anyone recommend a questionnaire(s) that can be used for both? 
Many thanks,
Alex
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Hi Rimantas, 
This is really helpful. Many thanks for your contribution. 
Alex
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How does empty nest affect single mothers? Is there any difference in reaction/emotions than for married mothers?
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The paper aims not directly on empty nest but on single mother's well-being when adolescents start to become more independent 
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This refers to The Adolescent Depression knowledge Questionnaire with authors Hart, S.R, et.al
How may I receive permission to use the scale?
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Hello Mary
You probably have found the answer by now, but I didn't know if you were aware that the authors were members of ResearchGate; if you have not yet gained permission, it might be worth contacting them:
Hart, S. R., Kastelic, E. A., Wilcox, H. C., Beaudry, M. B., Musci, R. J., Heley, K. M., ... & Swartz, K. L. (2014). Achieving Depression Literacy: The Adolescent Depression Knowledge Questionnaire (ADKQ). School Mental Health, 6(3), 213-223.
Good luck and very best wishes
Mary
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SDQ = Strenghts and Difficulties Questionnaire Is anyone aware of any studies (even unpublished) checking on hyperactivity-inattention with the SDQ quest on Anorexia Nervosa children/adolescents?
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Dear Bruno,
I wonder if these articles are of interest to you:
  • Using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) to screen for child psychiatric disorders in a community sample by Robert Goodman.
  • Eating disorders in children and adolescents. First results of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS) by H. Hölling & R.Schlack. [Article in German].
  • The hyperactivity/inattention subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire predicts short- and long-term weight loss in overweight children and adolescents treated as outpatients by A. van Egmond-Froehlich, M. Bullinger and others.
Best wishes,
Stephen
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I am conducting an analysis of records of intervention with juvenile fire setters, searching for correlates between the identified risk factors (social, environmental, behavioural, psychological) in the young person, and the methodologies used to set fires - the versatility of the fire setting.
I have not found much research that has been conducted to date that links these artefacts explicitly. 
Yet...
Are you aware of research that explores the interconnection between risk factors and methodologies? 
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Perhaps you might also find these two articles useful for your research.DOI:10.1080/14330237.2011.10820511 and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158524/
These are my publications as I have researched into conduct disorder issues (antisocial behaviour among adolescents aged 10-18).
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I am researching this topic and I'm having a difficult time finding current empirical articles.
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Part of the lack of resources may also have to do with there not being official training/school for adolescents that Montessori certified. I have taught at a Montessori middle school, but it was based upon/inspired by Montessori's work with lower elementary. 
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I'm currently setting up a study evaluating a clinical intervention for looked after children. I'm aware that there are quite complex issues around gaining consent with this population (incl. consent from local authorities, foster-carers, birth families as well as the young people themselves), and considerable challenges in doing this in a timely way, if the study is a clinical one and we don't want to delay access to services. Is there anyone out there who has experience in this area who'd be willing to share their experiences? Our study is in the UK, but would be interesting to hear about situation in other countries too.
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Dear Nick,
Although John's comments are helpful I guess this highlights the difference between collecting data as a programme evaluation (not for publication but for internal quality assurance purposes) or whether this is research for possible publication in the scientific/public domain. If the latter, then guardian consent and child assent seem applicable - certainly in our own context in South Africa.
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I want to see the locus control of adolescent in coping with negative events in their life where the end result would be happiness.
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I agree, an interesting question and much of this does relate to the resilience of the adolescent as well as whether the adolescent can make a connection with a 'significant other' who has a positive influence on their life.
You may want to search for an updated version of the book below.
Coleman J and Hagell A (Eds) (2007) Adolescence, Risk and Resilience: Against the Odds. West Sussex: Wiley.
IBSN 970-0-470-02502-4 (HB) 978-0-470--02503-1 (PB) 
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Greetings of the day respected researchers.
Does anyone have information about moral judgement tools for females?
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On sex differences in moral judgement it seems interesting that the meta-analyses by Stam et al (van Stam, M.A. ; van der Schuur, W.A. ; Tserkezis, S. ; van Vugt, E.S. ; Asscher, J.J. ; Gibbs, J.C. ; Stams, G.J.J.M.
Children and Youth Services Review, 2014, Vol.38, pp.44-51) indicates a different effect  on moral reasoning of boys and girls of the Equip training program.
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Specifically:
• Do changes in parent-child weight-related communication impact on children’s wellbeing and self-perceptions?
• Do changes in parent-child weight-related communication impact on children’s eating or exercise behaviours and practices?
• Are the effects of parent-child weight-related communication moderated by; child’s weight, age, gender, stimulus for weight talk, parenting style*
• What are the specific strategies and techniques within interventions to improve adult-child weight-related communication associated with positive health or wellbeing outcomes?
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This is a major research focus of my colleague, Alexandra Corning (at University of Notre Dame). Check out her work!
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How parents can help their children to draw a positive image about their academic life, or study? DO you think there are specific variables of parenting we can examine in relation to self-concept?
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The key thing is to recognise that the child is an independent being with her own mind, life experience and aspirations. She/he is not an extension of us and we need not see ourselves reflected in her. Paying attention and listening to her and helping her discover herself is important. But there can be no rules in this of do this and do that. Each would do according to what they can and the way the relationship
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This summer I will travel to Uganda and work on a participatory action research project with Gulu University and a group of formerly abducted young women. Although the impact of war on children is almost always severe there is research  that indicates that positive adaptation can follow exposure to armed conflict. Often this growth is indicated as a result of a lack of PTSD symptoms. I am looking for a validated instrument to measure posttraumatic resilience.
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Hi Michelle,
I am not aware of the exact instruments, but would recommend checking the publications of this researcher as he is an expert in resilience:
Michael Ungar, Dalhousie University (he is director of the Resilience Research Centre and has done research on resilience across many cultures including Africa) 
Toula
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Spirituality is an integrating construct that works with our cognitive, emotional and social sides (integrating heart, mind and soul) to provide meaning and purpose to our life. I want to study if there is any correlation between spirituality and social skills. your insight will be very valuable.
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Here is an interesting article I found by a renowned adolescent health research at Johns Hopkins university which supports the idea that spirituality is one of several protective factors which enhances social competence and promotes resilience in youth.
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Public schools' curricula are based in large part on developmental needs of children and adolescents. For example, much of early childhood lessons take into consideration the social component of learning, i.e, cooperation, getting along with others, etc. As children's social development matures and they progress through school, so too does the need for teaching or lessons to change or to remain developmentally appropriate. By the time students reach adolescence, teachers' lessons might call for students to develop group projects as part of a course requirement. There are many other childhood and adolescent developmental needs that become embedded into their K-12 (and beyond) education. One developmental aspect that I don't see reflected in school curricula is racial identity development. Racial identity development theorists (Cross, Helms, etc.) have posited for decades the importance of one's racial identity development. In detailing her racial identity models, Helms (2003) talks about how racial identity development is a natural part of children and adolescents' development that's constantly being expressed in the classroom environment. Such moments are great opportunities for teachers to help children of color to feel connected to all others in the school/classroom and positive about themselves and others of their racial group. However, teachers without appropriate knowledge and skills are not able to respond effectively to students' racial identity related behaviors. 
Is there any research out there that looks into attending to student racial identity needs within the school context? 
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Brantlinger, E. A. (1993). The politics of social class in secondary school: Views of affluent and impoverished youth. New York: Teachers College, Columbia University.
Esmonde, I. (January 01, 2009). Ideas and Identities: Supporting Equity in Cooperative Mathematics Learning. Review of Educational Research, 79, 2, 1008-1043.
Delpit, L. (1988). The Silenced Dialogue: Power and pedagogy in educating other people’s children. Harvard Educational Review, 58(3), 280-298.
Martin, D. B. (March 08, 2013). Learning Mathematics while Black. Educational Foundations, 26, 47-66.
Martin, D. B. (2000). Mathematics success and failure among African-American youth: The roles of sociohistorical context, community forces, school influence, and individual agency. Mahwah, N.J: Lawrence Erlbaum.
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I am currently researching on adolescents with eating disorders (early adolescence 11-13). Using an assessment questionnaire on traumatic experiences my data show that parents of these adolescents have frequently experienced traumatic events (phisical, sexual, etc.).
Is anyone familiar with literature addressing this phenomenon? I know papers dealing with mothers' traumatic experiences and eating disorders in children and toddlers but not in adolescents.
In particular I cannot find references on fathers' traumatic experiences and eating disorders in early adolescents.
Thank you
Luca
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Thank you!
Very interesting!
Béatrice
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Allegory for adolescence?
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Hi Douglas,
I really appreciate this information.  Thanks so much.
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I currently work with a two year old who is living with both, hearing and visual impairment. Is somebody experienced in this field and can help with ideas for effective interventions? 
The child has no cognitive impairment and is spatially very well oriented. Focus of the therapy is currently to help her get in contact with other children.
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A famous musician, a person who can tell you more with own experience about this question is the deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie. Contact her via homepage: http://www.evelyn.co.uk/evelyn-glennie
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I am using Tinita body composition analyzer for my study. The devices can't be used for the children under 15 years of age. I don't want to go for a manual method.
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Have you looked at the Omron?  That handheld analyzer has been validated in children as young as 10.
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Does anyone have access to the complete version of the Weinberger Parenting Inventory -Child Version (WPI-C)? If not, do you know where it can be found? I am only finding the adult version
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Spera, Christopher, ICF International, 9300 Lee Highway, Fairfax, 22031, US, cspera@icfi.com has used the inventory in:
Adolescents' Perceptions of Parental Goals, Practices, and Styles in Relation to Their Motivation and Achievement. Spera, Christopher. The Journal of Early Adolescence 26.4 (Nov 2006): 456-490.
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What do know about the psychological characteristics or well-being of children of lesbian and gay parents? What do we know about same-sex parent headed families and the further psychosexual development (gender typed behavior) of boys and girls?
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Not that Wikipedia is a peer-reviewed publication, but I recognized the name Paul Cameron. This is copied from the site (please note Cameron was expelled from the APA regarding an ethics inquiry):
[from Wikipedia] "Paul Drummond Cameron (born November 9, 1939) is an American psychologist and sex researcher. While employed at various institutions including the University of Nebraska he conducted research on passive smoking, but he is best known today for his claims about homosexuality. After a successful 1982 campaign against a gay rights proposal in Lincoln, Nebraska, he established the Institute for the Scientific Investigation of Sexuality (ISIS), now known as the Family Research Institute (FRI). As FRI's chairman, Cameron has written papers associating homosexuality with perpetration of child sexual abuse and reduced life expectancy.
In 1983, the American Psychological Association expelled Cameron for non-cooperation with an ethics investigation. Position statements issued by the American Sociological Association, Canadian Psychological Association and the Nebraska Psychological Association have accused Cameron of misrepresenting social science research."
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In a classroom, a child annoying others. If this is the way he is how can we influence tolerance and change in the peers? What does this look like and how can this be achieved?
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For learning tolerance and communication a number of contextual conditions are required, without which hardly get our students internalize what we intend to learn. These conditions are, among others, the following:
Models of communication.
Consistent reinforcement of good behaviors and values
Ability to critically analyze and exchange views with others and others.
Consistency between messages, attitudes and behaviors.
Contexts facilitators of participation.
Cooperative Learning is a consistent didactic strategy, basically forming groups of students working together for a common purpose teaching strategy: learning, everyone, together in collaboration.
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I would be grateful for any information.
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Excellent. Thank you, Maria
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Re authoring the self narrative would require greater self awareness. I am looking for any experience/suggestions people may have
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Hello,
I am a high school teacher working predominantly with Year 9 students so I am answering this from a very practical teacher point of view. At my school we recognise that fostering emotional intelligence is really important for adolescents, especially when they are experimenting with different identities and relationships. We have been using a great gender-based programme called "The Rite Journey" which has been an amazing tool for working with students in this area. We run small, gender-based classes of approximately 15-18 students. Being female, I have only worked with girls and in our groups we have covered a range of issues relating to emotional intelligence such as friendships, self-talk, self-concept, body image, relationships with adults (parents/teachers etc.), intimate relationships etc. Have a look at www.theritejourney.com.au
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I've seen some qualitative work on this, and I'm in the process of tracking down quantitative work as well. I've seen reasons cited like privacy (i.e., "I don't want him talking to strangers"), age and appropriateness of topics (i.e,. "I don't want her talking to a stranger about personal topics"). From the focus groups I've observed, I have a feeling that dad's of daughters are the group most likely to refuse participation. Is there any research to support that?
Any key papers on surveying teens and minors that I should be looking at? Any surveys using particularly innovative methods for increasing parent consent? I know the general survey methods literature well, but I'm wondering if there are good papers that might be hiding out there in other fields (or that passed under my radar). The context is phone, mail, and face-to-face surveys specifically, not school-based or doctor-based studies, or surveys where kids can opt themselves in without parent consent.
Thanks in advance for anything you have to share.
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In Australia, for phone surveys using landlines, 'household refusal' is highest when recruiting men and a woman answers the phone. Women often refuse on behalf of their husbands or sons. When we recruit men directly by mobile, the gender difference disappears.
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And what could explain the non-significant differences between males and females in employing both types of strategies?
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Lot of research links attachment security or insecurity to emotion regulation styles in adolescence. Rationale for this link seems obvious but is theoretically and clinically very interesting and relevant. Sure an very interesting part of literature, for instance showing that anxious attachment leads to other styles or ER than avoidant attachment, both of course more maladaptive ER styles than secure attachment. Use combined search terms in WoS or other databases, and you'll find good literature on this.