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Adapted Physical Activity - Science topic

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If you have some papers to advise me, I am interested in.
Thank you in advance
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Disabled people are considered under WHO recommandations for daily physical activity, but standard measures used for healthy people could them really be used at the same for disabled ?
In other way, for example, for a femoral amputee, walking at 4m/s speed is it under 3 MET (very low level activity) or over (low activity)?
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Emmanuelle Cugy Firstly, physical activity guidelines expressed using Metabolic Equivalent Tasks (METs) are not useful for the general public. The concept of METs is difficult to understand and few people are familiar with it. It is really challenging for the public to know the MET values for any/all the activities they do.
Secondly, The energy consumption in people with limb amputation would be certainly much higher for amputees. To my knowledge METs values and disability have not been worked on very much. See systematic review
Metabolic costs of activities of daily living in persons with a lower limb amputation: A systematic review and meta-analysis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30893346
Thirdly, there has been some work on METs and paraplegia which may help guide you.
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Dear all,
I will start a study about the effect of physical exercise (HIIT and strength training) on testosterone levels in a male young subject with a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism condition. Thus, I have two questions:
  1. do you know any study?
  2. In your opinion, what could be the best exercise program for this subject?
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Dear Antonio de fano,
Maybe the following papers will help you:
Mauras N, Hayes V, Welch S, Rini A, Helgeson K, Dokler M, Veldhuis JD, Urban RJ. Testosterone deficiency in young men: marked alterations in whole body protein kinetics, strength, and adiposity. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1998;83(6):1886-92. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.333.6322&rep=rep1&type=pdf
Zitzmann M, Nieschlag E. Testosterone levels in healthy men and the relation to behavioural and physical characteristics: facts and constructs. Eur J Endocrinol 2001;144(3):183-97. http://www.eje-online.org/content/144/3/183.full.pdf
Nindl BC, Kraemer WJ, Deaver DR, Peters JL, Marx JO, Heckman JT, Loomis GA. LH secretion and testosterone concentrations are blunted after resistance exercise in men. J Appl Physiol (1985) 2001;91(3):1251-8. http://jap.physiology.org/content/jap/91/3/1251.full.pdf
Hackney AC. Effects of endurance exercise on the reproductive system of men: the "exercise-hypogonadal male condition". J Endocrinol Invest 2008;31(10):932-8. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anthony_Hackney/publication/20481490_Endurance_Training_and_Testosterone_Levels/links/549987c00cf2d6581ab14b86/Endurance-Training-and-Testosterone-Levels.pdf
Best wishes from Germany,
Martin
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Does anyone have any walking exercise program for people with intellectual disability ? Can you help me?
Or know the literature in this area?
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Hi Saeid,
I have just finished working on report rethinking public health interventions with disabled people.
The study aimed:  (1) To examine the literature on theories and models of disability; (2) to assess whether or not, and how, intervention studies of effectiveness could incorporate more inclusive approaches that are consistent with these theories and models; and (3) to use the findings to draw out implications for improving evaluative study designs and evidence-based practice.
You might find some of the research we have included  and findings helpful.
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I want to do a systematic review about this and I need a lot of articles. Can you help me? Thank you very much!
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I don't have papers, but I warmly recommend my paper of lifestyle modification parallels to sleeve success which speaks exactly about this subject
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If I have a RCT where I have a control group (receiving funny data messages) and an intervention group (diet, physical activity tips reinforced with self-efficacy) with the aim of improving glycemic control.
I measured physical activity (PA) with an accelerometer. And I want to know the pros and cons of using my PA data as continuous and as a categorical variable.
Thank you for your help and time.
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Hi Alejandra,
In general, if you have a continuous variable (such as PA measured by accelerometry), it is much better to use it as it is, continuous. From a statistical point of view, categotizing continuous variables will lead to lost of information.However, depending on what you need to study, sometimes it is practical/necessary to categorize.
In your case, as I understand, you want to examine the relationship between receiving self-efficacy messages (or not) and glycemic control, after controling for diet and PA. I would then use physical activity as a continuous variable. You could use total PA, MVPA, or whatever literature suggests.
You can review this article for further information:
Altman DG, Royston P. The cost of dichotomising continuous variables. British Medical Journal. 2006;332:1080.
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How do you rate (percent wise) the performance of skills? Is the rating based on the criterion with minimum standard or based on the way the student performs the skills based on skill cues? Do you give a greater score to students for competency on the skill performance such as time and distance or based on skill cues?
How do we know that students have learned a physical education skill? We can assess students using formative and summative assessments but how do we know that students will actually be able to use their skills in real-life, authentic situations? In short, how do we know that our students are competent in the target technique?
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Dear Hashem: First we have to be sure that students did learn the required physical education skills, and thereafter have the moral to be able to use their skills when needed in the real-life and authentic situations.