Science topic

Abiotic Stress - Science topic

Abiotic stress is defined as the negative impact of non-living factors on the living organisms in a specific environment. The non-living variable must influence the environment beyond its normal range of variation to adversely affect the population performance or individual physiology of the organism in a significant way.
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Hello Researchers,
Definition: a sterile vestigial pistil remaining in a staminate flower
Factors:
  1. Genetic Constitution: (Genic & Cytoplasmic Genes)
  2. Biotic Stress (PLOs, Viruses, Fungi, infesting insect damage)
  3. Abiotic Stress (High Temperature, Sever Cold)
Inference: Most common causal factor for phyllody is abiotic stress, if phyllody is effected by stresses, plant can attend into normal stage after stabilization of hormonal flow in a favorable environmental condition. Phyllody caused by genetic factor has been reported to be inheritable in many crops (Primula, prunus..)
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Dear @Mahammed Faizan For appearance of any disease, there should be a susceptible host, virulent pathogen and favorable environment. Phyllody has been reported in many leguminous crops such as Fenugreek, red gram, chickpea, and the like. In Fenugreek, it has been reported to be a recessive trait.
Choudhary AK. 2002. Indian J Genet, 62: 177-178.
Empirical observations suggest that in chickpea and red gram also, phyllody is inherited as a recessive trait. In chickpea, I have noticed a few infected plants in majority of genotypes grown in late sown, continually irrigated condition. It is interesting to observe that some branches of the same infected plants appeared as normal ones. This calls for further investigation.
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Is it that chlorophyll content and protein level are significantly affected under drought?
Do drought-tolerant genotypes produce specific secondary metabolites? If yes what are the secondary metabolites?
What should one look for (in terms of biochemical parameters) when studying drought tolerance or sensitivity in legume or cereal genotypes.
Please see the link below:
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I have a gene of interest (assume X) which plays role in many developmental events in plants. But I am trying to find its role in abiotic stress sepcifically drought stress. I have checked the expression of X in few different tissues where X express abundantly under drought stress (data available in database and reports) which is significant.
I was thinking to explore how X gene controls the photosystem when the plants are under stress. X gene is already reported to be involved in the regulation of photosynthetic genes using trangenics and other interaction assays.
Now, I am stucked in what way I can proceed. Could anyone provide me any suggestions?
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Please look at the following article.
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We all are facing the problem of increasing climatic change and abiotic stress is increasing day by day and organic agriculture is getting challenged so how the science community will face this all.
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interesting question
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There are several compounds like Salicylic acid and Jasmonic acid regulates plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses as well as plant growth and development. Besides these two what other similar chemicals that can apply as a crop protection products in commercial agriculture?
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Both Abscisic acid and ethylene play role in stress signalling
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Dear Researchers,
I am studying genome-wide identification and expression analysis of a gene family in passion fruit, which has a role in biotic and abiotic stresses, In previous reports mostly researchers used seedling to apply stresses for the analysis of the expression levels, but I was considering using the passion fruit peel or pulp as material after biotic and abiotic stresses for qPCR expressions,
1- which material will be recommended, Peel or Pulp or both?
2- For biotic stress, I considered applying different pathogenic fungi on peel and will collect the peel samples after rotten occurs (5-7 dpi), and control samples will be without fungus infection.
So that will be fine?
2- And for abiotic stresses which parameters are more suitable - low or high temperature, or should be both? according to reports, the storage temperature of passion fruit is 3-5 C, so for abiotic stress should be used <3-5 C> temperatures? For example; 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 C, and 4 C will be considered as control, so is this all right?
Your suggestions will be welcome
Regard
Rizwan
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Abiotic stress imposed on plants by environment may be either physical or chemical, while as biotic stress exposed to the crop plants is a biological unit like diseases, insects, etc. ... Biotic stress in plants is caused by living organisms, specially viruses, bacteria, fungi, nematodes, insects, arachnids and weeds. See the link:
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I worked a sole bioinformatics work on cis elements involved in response to abiotic stress. In this work, we used a set of bioinformatics tools (pipeline) to extract gene sequences, their promoter regions, motifs, phylogenetic relationship, with main focus on regulatory elements and their annotation. I sent it to a journal but it send it back to me and asked me to do expression analysis of studied genes in lab. Unfortunately, currently I don’t have access to lab. So it would be appreciated if you could give me journals publishing sole bioinformatics works.
Many thanks,
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Methods that can help to find out the plant ABA content under abiotic stress.
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Dear @Girija Prasad Patnaik Please check the following links, and attached PDFs; hope, these may be be useful to you.
Best wishes, AKC
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DETAILS: The book series consists of three volumes about the role of bioresource technology in the areas of food, energy and environment. The book will be published by Springer Nature and will consist of around 60 chapters. Our aim is to bring together a galaxy of eminent, experienced scientists and active researchers to present current developments in this field. As you are an expert in this subject area, we are approaching you with the request for academic collaboration.
If you are interested and have an idea for this new book that you might wish to develop with us, please send us the provisional title of your contribution, an abstract (250 words) and full details of the contributing authors at pztanveer@gmail.com/kur.hakeem@gmail.com. You can choose any title from the below list or suggest any of your own titles.
TENTATIVE CHAPTER LIST: Volume 1: Bioresource Technology: Production of Super Foods 1. Underutilized crops: Solution to future food crises (Done) 2. Overview and applications of prebiotics and probiotics 3. Production of secondary metabolites using bioresources technology 4. Novel value-added products from fungi 5. Commercial-scale production of the enzyme for the feed industry 6. Algae as a potential source of nutrients 7. Chicory: as a potential candidate in the functional food sector (Done) 8. Nutraceuticals: As superfoods 9. Microbes and their role in abiotic stress tolerance in food crops 10. Novel nutraceuticals from marine resources 11. Lichens as a potential natural source of dyes in the food industry 12. Bio-fortification of millets for mitigating malnutrition 13. The journey from Traditional to Functional food sector 14. Role of nanotechnology in the food sector 15. Green and smart packaging of food 16. The technology involved in food waste management 17. Millets: Forgotten foods for the future 18. Plants as novel bio-factories 19. Insects as future food: Advances and challenges 20. Nanosensors: Diagnostic tools in the food industry
Volume 2: Bioresource Technology: Solution to Sustainable Energy 1. Bioenergy and biofuels: Overview and challenges 2. Dedicated energy plant species 3. Broad-spectrum of the first, second, third and fourth generation of biofuels 4. Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass: Recent advances in technology (Done) 5. Microalgae: Solution to sustainable energy production 6. Municipal solid waste: Potential source for biodiesel production through trans-esterification 7. Engineering of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock to reduce the pre-treatment cost 8. Short rotation coppice for bioenergy and biofuel application 9. Combined heat and power (CHP) programme and district heating system 10. Power generation from jumble based biomass 11. Nanotechnological approach for the production of biofuels 12. Wood pellet technology-Recent advances 13. Artificial photosynthesis: Future novel source of clean energy 14. Biogas production from landfills 15. Biofuels: economics and major challenges 16. Photo-bioreactors: Recent advances and challenges 17. Ethical aspects of Bioenergy and Biofuels 18. Overview and application of metagenomics in cellulase production 19. Biomass briquette technology
Volume 3: Bioresource Technology: Solution to Sustainable Environmental 1. Remediation of soil through Phyto-engineering approach 2. Phytoremediation driven energy crops production on heavy metal degraded areas as a local energy carrier 3. Recent advances in microbial-assisted phytoremediation 4. Phytoextraction and phytomining-overview and challenges 5. Omics technology: Frontiers in engineering Plants for Heavy Metal Stress Tolerance (Done) 6. Concept and overview of microalgae in wastewater treatment 7. Biochar production to rejuvenate soil health and carbon sequestration 8. CRISPR/Cas9 technology: An innovative approach to enhance phytoremediation process 9. Energy plantation to restore the waste dumpsites 10. Bioplastics: Solution to a green environment 11. Approaches of carbon sequestration for mitigating greenhouse gases (GHG) 12. Role of nanotechnology in a sustainable environment 13. Recent advances in the photo technology 14. Aromatic plants as new candidates in phytoremediation 15. Green Buildings: concept and recent advances 16. Challenges, issues and policies for a sustainable environment 17. Advances in Carbon sequestration technology 18. Ecotourism: A way forward for bioeconomy
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Ok je vais vous envoyer le resume de mon chapitre
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Why these transcription factors have fused name from two different protein For e.g AP2 play their role in flower development and ERF is ethylene response factor, But in ABA signalling in abiotic stress. We write them together as a single transcription factor protein.
One answer could be that this is different protein but shared the conserved domain or motif of AP2 and ERF.
Second answer could be that this is the superfamily name which consist both transcription factors in it. But why we mentioned it like a single protein (see in figure )in ABA signalling.
I need some clarity.
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This figure
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Journals submitting short communication (Plants related research)
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If the work is of very high standard, then the Journals like Plant cell, J. Exp. Bot; Crop Sci; Pl. Physiol Biochem, J Plant Soil Sci; Proc. Indian Natn Sc. Acad; Pl cell Phsiol etc. may be tried. Otherwise, there are number of open access journals where works on abiotic stress and functional biology can be published.
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Hello everyone, I'm doing some experiments with plants by exposing them to abiotic stress. I have estimated the DPPH inhibition percentage but don't know about what should be the trend (either decreasing or increasing)? Even I have read the literature but still confused.
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I work in apricot research and we have a breeding program for abiotic stress tolerance. I collect data from the cultivars i could use in this program individually, but there are several hundred cultivars in Europe.
I would ask, if there is any database where I can find complete descriptions which is searchable? I mean if i am looking for a special trait, I can select by that criteria.
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In addition to genetic and environmental factors, fruit size is also influenced by crop load, rootstock, orchard planting system/tree training system, pollination, water and nutrient management, biotic and abiotic stress, etc.
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Dear K. L. Kumawat To my opinion, growing optimum population size of the genotype along with 1-2 check varieties in the ideal environment, and repeating the same twice/thrice will provide a nearly true value of the genetic potential of the genotype in question.
Thanks!
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Which housekeeping gene is better for both biotic and abiotic stress in wheat? should we use two or more housekeeping gene? Thanks for answer.
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Two interesting papers on the reference gene validation:
More specifically for wheat,
There are some nice published papers on the subject:
For example for abiotic stress
Developmental process
With kind regards
Christophe
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Hydrogen gas has effects on a range of physiological events in plants. It has been shown to have effects on seed germination, plant growth, and development. It has also been found to be involved in plant stress responses and to be protective against pathological abiotic stress challenges. Similarly, it also has beneficial effects during the post-harvest storage of crops. Therefore, its use in the agricultural setting has great potential as it appears to be safe, with no toxicity or harm to the environment.
This Special Issue aims to bring together a body of papers that focus on the current state-of-play of the molecular biology and possible uses of molecular hydrogen with plants. It is hoped that this Special Issue will highlight the future work which may be undertaken in this field and help to encourage researchers to investigate this exciting field further.
For more information please follow the URL, below.
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I am interested , hope we will get some waiver for processing charges as MDPI are open access
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I want to establish hairy roots of my plant for abiotic stress treatment, but I want to do it without involvement of Agrobacterium. In every previously done research works, researchers have used the bacterium A. tumefaciens for infection and generation of roots. is there any other simple method which doesnt involve the bacteria?
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Agro. tumefaciens is used for getting transgenic shoots.
Agro. Rhizogenes strains are used to get those "crazy" roots, growing by themselves with no hormones added.
Either way: if you use one of the Agros you always have to go thru cleaning the shoots or roots thru antibiotics.
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Kindly request to experts / scientists to share opinions on spongy tissue formation causes and remedies to overcome the problem.
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Spongy tissue is a physiological ripening disorder in ‘Alphonso’ mango. The spongy tissue develops as yellowish white corky patches with or without air pockets in the breakdown tissues. It has become a major problem in ‘Alphonso’ mango cultivation, and has adversely affected its export.
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I have gene analysis experiment in Arabidopsis thaliana using qRT-PCR, I'm wondering which reference genes i can use knowing that i subjected the plants to abiotic stress ( abscisic acid, H2O2, HNE ( 4-hydroxynonenal)) Thanks in advance
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Some more suggestions. With Arabidopsis thaliana, you should have no problems finding stable HKGs since it's a model species. However, remember that the stability of each HKG has to be confirmed before using it for your results because the fact that some HKG are stable during, for example, water stress does not mean that they will be stable in your case with different doses of abscisic acid, H2O2, HNE, etc. Overall, the genes that are often used for abiotic stress in plants include: GAPDH, UBQ, ACT, 18S, TUB, and EF
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Hello all,
I hope this question finds you well !
I'm currently working on development of indicators mixing sustainability and economy....so my question is the following:
Is the costs of resources are only affected by the market volatility of supply/demand, or it is more linked to the resource's depletion ?
If not, what could be the other indicators (global politics...) that could impact the resource price ?
Thanks,
Regards,
Nacef
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Rising costs could be due to many factors. Apart from volatility and supply -demand imbalance ,the reasons could range from political , trade agreements between few countries at the cost of others and calamities(Covid-19). Single source supplier could also create havoc in manipulating prices. As regards resource depletion, it is not as if it happens within a short period. The industries are all well informed about the availability of raw materials and accordingly are working on newer technologies so as to reduce dependence on the depleting resources. In fact tech disruptions have become so common that new products with better features at less cost are replacing the existing ones. Coal( nuclear), petrol( Hybrid) etc are examples of depleting resources and alternatives
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Hi,
Transposable element/ Transposons are one of the main targets of genetic engineering nowadays due to their ability to alter gene expression. My query is whether TE can help plants to cope up with biotic/ abiotic stress?
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In my study I have exposed the volunteers to 4 separate 45 second stressors that are a mixture of modalities (audio/visual) and task types (emotion-evoking/cognitive) with 3 minute baselines in between. A continuous ECG is trace is taken throughout the experiment, from the gross heart rate I hope to work out heart rate variability. My aim is to test the validity of heart rate variability as an objective stress assessment method for psychophysiological stress. My question is at what point on the ECG trace for each volunteer would I analyse the gross heart rate to work out Heart Rate variability for each of the four stressors i.e. pre-stressor, post-stressor and why ?
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The body's should develop compensatory response to stress with 20seconds in which the effect could be felt by the brain although it depends most times on the intensity of the stressor
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I work on some stress tolerance genes from plants. I clone those genes in pYES2 yeast expression vector and transform in to INVSc1 yeast strain to perform stress tolerance assay using different abiotic stress factos. Some months back I lost the viability of the yeast strain and now need those INVSc1 strain. Is any one know about yeast strain which I can use like INVSc1 yeast strain for stress tolerance experiment? I would really helpful to know about this.
Thanks
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K601 and K667 works fine with pYES2 vector.
Also Dr Gridhar K Pandeys research group have these two yeast strains.
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I urgently require fresh seeds of true and registered accessions of IR29, Pokkali, Nonabokra, N-22 and IR64 for germination and some research work on abiotic stress. I would like to ask what is the procedure to get those from central seed repositories in India like NRRI. Is it also possible to get some stocks from any lab currently working on these varieties?
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any imports between countries would go through a lengthy import procedure as the genotypes would be tested for carrier of viruses etc, you could try from CRRI Cuttack or also scientists who have published on them are entitled to share materials if they have
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Under the condition of abiotic stress,how to determine or judge the changes of photosynthetic rate are caused by stomatal factors or non-stomatal factors?
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The most common method for assessing the relative limitation to the rate of photosynthesis (A) of leaves has been to measure A over a range of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (Ca) and at the same time measure the leaf surface (stomatal) conductance to water loss, using the calculations developed by Farquhar and von Caemmerer. From these measurements the CO2 concentration inside the leaf is calculated. The measurements are used to obtain the A/Ci curve. and these can be compared under different conditions of light, humidity and water deficits in the leaves. Using these methods has shown that water deficits decrease stomatal conductance, but also increases progressively and much more the limitation of the A caused by inhibition of metabolic processes. This resulting from slower synthesis of RuBP in the chloroplast as a consequence of inhibited synthesis of ATP. Suggestions that impaired transport of CO2 from the substomatal cavities into the chloroplast is the cause just do not explain the experimental data.
I suggest reading the papers by Lawlor and collaborators which are available on Researchgate. The papers contain references which will help understand how the evaluation is done. E.G
Photosynthetic carbon assimilation and associated metabolism in relation to water deficits in higher plants.Lawlor DW1, Cornic G.
Plant Cell and Environment, 25 275-294
Causes of decreased photosynthetic rate and metabolic capacity in water-deficient leaf cells: A critical evaluation of mechanisms and integration of processes,
Lawlor DW, Tezara Z 2009 Annals of Botany 103(4):561-79 ·
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When the plant is subjected to abiotic stress, physiological, anatomical and phenotypic changes occur in the plant, as well as free radicals or the so-called reactive oxygen species (ROS) are released.
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Not really
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The duration and intensity of drought is increasing worldwide largely due to climate change.
Development and genetic improvement of drought tolerance crop become very important for the future due the effect of climate change.
What the best method for screening and evaluation drought stress on crop plants especially "rice"?
Thank you for the answer
Best Regards.
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There are so many ways to go on this direction of rice improvement you can consider early stress or later stage stresses considering Physiological, morphological as well as biochemical Indicators for Stress Tolerance, most importantly you can consider G X E as a special way of evaluation.
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We are trying to increase the abiotic stress tolerance in rice by introducing certain stress tolerant genes via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The question I have is related to our plasmid construct. It has two selective markers, a kanamycin resistance gene (Npt1) and a glufosinate resistant gene (bar) as bacterial and plant selective markers, respectively. A CAMV35s has been used as the promoter for bar gene. Can 35s promoter function in Agrobacterium as well?
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Thank you Vivek A.
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I need an updated (published in the last 5 years) book clearly and extensively explaining the concepts underlying developmental processes (embryogenesis, flower, root, shoot and leaf development) in plants and how plant endogenous signals and environmental signals are perceived and integrated into the initiation, proceeding and control of developmental processes.
Thanks in advance
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Mr. Hicham Mechqoq, thanks for your answer, it has been really useful.
Dr. Maged G. Bin-Saad, the most recent publication with the title you wrote dates back to 1987, I was looking for recent ones.
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Dear all scientists,
I want to do RNA-seq study on a medicinal herb which grows in wild nature. I am new in this field and I don’t how to do sampling for my experiment. I should mention each individual plant of the herb has different genotype and they are not the same genotype as a variety. I should also say that I want to use an abiotic stress to study the plant major biochemical compounds and corresponding pathways and moreover I can just afford to pay two samples to do RNA-seq. My question is: I) Should I use some genotypes for normal condition (for example the genotype A, B, C, D, E and F) and some other genotypes for treated condition (for example the genotypes  G, H, I, J, K and L). Then collect one sample from each genotypes. After forward pool samples “A” to “F”  together and also pool samples “G” to “L” together to have one pooled sample for normal condition and one pooled sample for treated condition? OR II) Should I use just ONE plant (for example, a plant from genotype “A”) for normal condition and ONE plant for treated condition (for example, a plant from genotype “G”)? OR III) Should I make some clones (vegetative propagation) from genotype “A” (for example, 6 clones from genotype “A”) and genotype “G” (for example 6 clones from genotype G), then collect samples from each plant. After forward pool 6 clones from genotype “A” together and also pool 6 clones from genotype “G” together to have one pooled sample for normal condition and one pooled sample for treated condition?   I wonder if I take solution number II or III. Since, I just use two genotypes (one genotype for normal and one genotype for stress condition), is there possibility that I miss some genes? With taking to account that it is an herb which grows in mountain and each individual plant of the herb has different genotype. Therefore the nature of each genotype is not known.
As a result, we can just choose genotypes by random. Just imagine that a sensitive genotype to the studied stress is chosen by chance. So, I will miss expression of some resistance genes in my dataset. The solution number I, is not better? Thanks in advance
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My review paper may give you some thoughts.
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Tobacco plants were subjected to 3 different nutritional treatments (A, B, C) for 3 weeks, and also were treated under two irrigation regimes during 2 weeks (Well-watered plants or Control plants, and Water deficit treated plants or drought plants). During drought plants treated with the treatments called "C" showed: (i) better water parameters, (ii) higher growth than control, (iii) higher water use efficiency and water saving, (iv) better recovery from extreme drought, etc.
Updated information:
  1. Model organism: Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)
  2. Pot size: 7.5 L pots (pot size 20 cm × 17 cm × 25 cm)
  3. Substrate: a mix of perlite:vermiculite (4:6)
  4. Treatments: Seeds were sown and two weeks later (15 days after sowing, DAS), seedlings were transplanted to 7.5 L pots. Then, plants were subjected to three different nutritional treatments. After 30 days (45 DAS), in addition to the three nutritional treatments, plants were also subjected to two irrigation treatments: optimal irrigation (control; CTR), in which pots containing tobacco plants were irrigated up to 100 % field capacity (3.5 mL g-1 substrate) throughout the experiment, and moderate sustained water deficit (WD), with pots irrigated every two days up to 60 % of field capacity (2.1 mL g-1 substrate) for 20 days (64-65 DAS).
Fresh biomass was collected in each treatment, and the following organic compounds were determined: MDA, H2O2, PROLINE, and PHENOLICS. Also, the PEROXISOME CATALASE activity was determined.
-Malonyl Dialdehyde (MDA) content, hydrogen peroxide content, and catalase activity are cellular oxidative stress biomarkers.
-Proline is a very important amino acid that which accumulation is correlated to plant stress tolerance
- Phenolics (phenolic compounds and flavonoids) are the largest group of phytochemicals that account for most of the antioxidant activity in plants.
In the attached figure there are the results of the ANOVA statistic in CTR or DROUGHT plants, and also is showing the logarithm with the base of 2 of the ratio between drought and control values to understand the decrease or increase in drought plants, in contrast, to control plants for each parameter.
What I see in this result is that there is no clear pattern related to a water deficit regarding the great results obtained in water parameters, plant biomass, water consumption/efficiency, photosynthetic activity, recovery from water stress deficit, etc.
To sum up there's complete nonsense in results in contrast to "C" treatment:
-No changes in MDA (reduction in the other nutritional treatments???????)
-Increase in CAT y H2O2???????
-a decrease in PROLINE????
-An increase in PHENOLIC compounds is logical due to the increase in H2O2, but it has no sense in plants that are more tolerant to drought.
I hope that someone might help me resolve this nonsense
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Hello J.D. Franco-Navarro
Your question can’t be answered as @Fahad Shafiq has correctly pointed out at the end of the comments because there is almost complete lack of information about the methods. The study seems to have been done with rather small plants, and in such a way that there would be a strong interaction between nutrition and water supply, making interpretation very difficult. Let us assume you grew the plants in soil, applied a liquid fertilizer and allowing some plants in each nutrient treatment to dry by stopping watering, while the control was given ample water. That is a standard molecular biology/biochemistry approach to such studies.
Which was the treatment supplying the most nutrients - A I suspect, with C supplying least. So plants in A would grow better than in C, and have more, larger leaves. When you started the drought treatment plants in A would dry the soil much faster than those in C – simply a matter of greater surface area in A. So plants in A would become severely drought stressed before those in C, which would appear to grow and be much more `drought resistant’. They would also have very different contents of metabolites. The lesson from this – if my supposition is true - is that it IS ESSENTIAL TO COMPARE PLANTS AT THE SAME RELATIVE WATER CONTENT. If this is not done then the study is invalid. I suggest my paper explains the problem and ways of doing such studies correctly – it focuses on GM plants but the problem is absolutely the same for all studies involving water supply.
Lawlor DW. Genetic engineering to improve plant performance under drought: physiological evaluation of achievements, limitations, and possibilities. J Exp Bot. 2013 Jan;64(1):83-108. doi: 10.1093/jxb/ers326. Epub 2012 Nov 16.
By ignoring the complexities involved with water supply in solid matrices and the effects of different rates of water loss, studies of the metabolism, genetic modifications etc are invalid. Hope this rather strong critic does not apply to your study. Please provide the necessary information about methods.
Best wishes
David
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I want to know the procedure how to give light treatment in case of transient expression studies. Like - to study the expression of one construct that lacks the light responsive element in its promoter.
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S. Sudarsono Thank you so much for the answer. It will surely help me.
Abdulnabi A.A. Matrood I wanted to see the effect of light on the promoter lacking the light response element in it. So I was asking for the procedure how to do it. I want to do a transient assay for it using agroinfiltration.
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Any free software for cross talk analysis among abiotic stress genes
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Jump software ASA software but not free
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In South Kalimantan, we have many rice cultivar that is potential to use as genetic resoures for breeding progam.
Some of this cultivar was cultivated in tidal swampland in South Kalimantan. Based on this fact, i have a hypotesis that this germplasm can adapted to salt stress due the wide range salinity as effect of tides.
What the best method for Screening and evaluation salt stress on rice?
Can anyone share a research paper about salt stress on rice?
Thank you for the answer
Best Regards.
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for your research, it will be necessary to use this approach: agro-morphological and physiological basis which underlie tolerance to salinity. this study will allow you to know which are the determining parameters to take into account when screening varieties. this activity will be followed by evaluation using the standard evaluation system (SES). The use of SES for salinity will allow you to know the degree of tolerance according to the entries. the results obtained will be explained by means of the previous study. send me your e-mail so that I can send you SES of salt. for the study on agro-morpholigic basis and to do a data analysis (ANOVA, SNK, ) please read my article on submergence. I am available to work with you, if possible, to write scientific articles. here is my e-mail: moteyami@yahoo.fr
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If 2 plants belonging to the same species for, example 2 lettuce plants, are cultivated in 2 soils with different organic matter content, will their responses to abiotic stress vary?
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yes, when we tested tolerance of phaseolus spp. to salinty, pH of soil and humidity of air had vital effects.
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As we know there are two types of stress biotic stress and abiotic stresses. Of which salinity is an abiotic stress and Na:K ratio is one of the factor to overcome abiotic stress.
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This article shows the role of K:Na to improve yield level under salinity stress
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Abiotic stress include:
- the light (excesss or not enough light)
- the air or soil humidity
- the temperature (too high or too low)
cause nutrient deficiency on plant ?
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that is a question with a very wide answer. most of abiotic stress affects plant water balance (the net of water absorption and transpiration) climate factors such as air temperature and humidity as well as solar radiation affect plant water loss through transpiration. the net energy intercepted by the plant affect the amount of water loss. moreover, the main stream of water uptake is driven by transpiration rate and this determine where some nutrients are accumulated in the most transpiring organ of the plant (the leaves) compared to the other organs and this also results in some local nutrient deficiencies such as Ca in the fruits which appear in the form of Blossom End Rot (BER) in tomato and paprika for example. . on the other hand, abiotic stresses like salinity or drought in the root zone can affect the absorption nutrients resulting in nutrient deficiencies even if the nutrients exist in the root zone. Temperature of the root zone plays also an important factor in the rate of absorption of both water and nutrient and may cause some nutrient deficiencies in the plant. please read the following for the explanation of some factors on the incidence of BER in relation to different environmental factors.
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We will be testing the alleviation of salt stress in rice using Bacillus subtilis. I was wondering if a greenhouse will be necessary for this experiment.
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It depends on the aim of your research. For example if you want to investigate the role or mode of action of bacillus on mitigating salt/drought stress, you will need to carry out your experiment in the greenhouse in order to neutralizer all other factors. under these conditions, your experiment has many artificial factors that are not in the field conditions. But if you want to determine the effect of Bacillus on mitigating the drought stress to come up with technical recommendation, you need to carry the experiment under field conditions so your recommendations can be applied in the field.
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Hi everyone,
I will be study the gene expression related to drought stress in woody plants, and I'm confused for the method to apply the stress. It Can anybody tell me what is the best way to applicate water stress on the woody seedling.
Knowing that woody seedlings are planted in soil pots.
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First, you have to determine the retention capacity of your substrate at 100%. Then, you have to calculate your drought degree ( for example 80, 60, 40% of the retention capacity). When you will start Drought application, you have to maintain the levels of irrigation in each pot 'constant' til the end of the experiment. So, every time you will irrigate, you have to weigh every pot and add the difference according to your drought level. An other thing, cover your substrate with a dark plastic to avoid algae, fungi and foam development. Regards
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I would like to get more information about naturally occuring osmoprotectants or compatible solutes (eg: glycine betaine, trehalose, sorbitol, fructan) in helping plants to cope with abiotic stress. Has anyone carried out related research or has good information to share?
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I tried glycine betaine is a good osmoprotectant. I tried it as foliar and soil application and it works.
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Research is going on to increase rice yields per unit of land. Simply increase the yield will not improve the income of farmers unless the total production is properly utilized? Distress sale of paddy is very common. Just like abiotic stress, distress sale is also a stress now to rice farmers. Rice is grown under different situations such upland, irrigated, rainfed lowland i.e. shallow (water-stagnation up to 30 cm), medium depth (31-50 cm), deep water (>50 to 100 cm) etc. We need technology and proper planning to improve the income of the farmers. What they are? Any technology, which tell about only to increase yield will not increase farmers income.
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1. Ensure Crop rotating/suitable cropping pattern
2. Make available good seed of suitable variety for the region
3. Train farmers for technologies
4. Grow farmers awareness
5. Ensure marketing
6. Reduce middle man from farmers to consumers
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What molecular mechanisms adopted by rice plants to overcome or avoid abiotic stress in relation to salt stress.
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I will use gel staining to investigate the response of some plant to water stress. such plants known to accumulate terpenoid Glycosides, what enzymes should I stain?
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Read these articles please. Thank you and good luck.
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what are the research laboratories that work on bacteria and plant interactions under environmental constraints and who accept students and researchers for training courses?
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Ok thank you very much @Caspar Chater
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I have done some luminol based ROS assays, mainly using this protocol:
However, I only get a ROS response using FLG22. I have also tried to expose my leaf discs to high salt (150mM), sorbitol (300mM) cold (putting the 96 well plates in ice water), but none have given any ROS response.
I was wondering if anybody has any idea why this doesn't work? Or how I could make this work. I'd prefer the luminol based assays. But I will probably start using different methods if is not possible to test abiotic stresses this way.
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Let me clarify that I am interrested in the ROS pulse you get from the first sensing of a stress. Not the ROS that is produced when the cell is actually damaged, which is on longer time scales
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How can efficiency of photosynthesis be increased in paddy to increased yield with increasing abiotic stress .
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Dr Kulvir and Dr Franz thank-you for your thought provoking suggestions and research paper on Arabidopsis which will help me to comprehend in best possible ways about photosynthesis and yield attributes .
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i am working on role of different sources of nitrogen in overcoming abiotic stress in plants. Could you provide me best sources of nitrogen in the form of nitrates used by farmers or researchers now a days?
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If the abiotic stress is related to acid soil condition the feeding with Calcium Nitrate will be effective in increasing the pH lowering the stress for acid environment. In an alkaline environment high carbonate the use of ammonium sulfate will be effective in acidifying the soil root environment adding the ability to remove insolubility of iron or zinc chlorosis. Humic acids can be able to aid in both these conditiona as well as kelp products. The use of compost and earthworm casting are highly effective organic N resources and aid in combating a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. The symbiotic partners of mycorrhizal fungi symbiotic biological nitrogen fixing bacteria and the use of growth promoting microbes are very useful when employed correctly.
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LC-MS of rice root under abiotic stress grown under hydroponic condition.
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Qualitative TLC is very important with different solvent systems before LC-MS analyses.
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What's the best way to measure stomatal conductance in grasses?
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To accurately measure Stomatal conductance and other photosynthetic parameters sophisticated instruments such as LiCOR 6800, CI340 and CIRAS-3 are available which are portable and very useful in field measurements of grasses and crop plants. The obtained data is very reliable and accurate.
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We are interested to carry out our research on molecular aspect of abiotic stress tolerance using mung bean as target crop.
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You may contact IBPGR or the Research Institute, which I suppose,
working on pulses, under Indian Council of Agriculture Research which is located at Kanpur, U.P., India.
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Especially oxidative stress like UV
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My work is on transcriptome analysis of plant under abiotic stress condition. I had perform RNA-seq analysis on non-treated samples (0-day), 7-days and 28-days treated samples. I'm wondering is it appropriate if I perform comparison using single-point control? or better with parallel control for each treatment time point?
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In fact parallel control will reveal best results as output as compared to fixed one
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Before I go for LC-MS i wish to do initial check and have a view of probable metabolites which would help me in getting better result.
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It depends on what you mean for initial checks and the answer is not so simple as one can expect. Obviously, as first thing, you should read a lot of manuscripts on rice metabolome and rice metabolic changes due to abiotic stress, in order to have a clear “state of art” in your mind. If the abiotic stress results in visible effects, you should choose the stress parameters that are strong enough to show symptoms without causing the death of the plant. In this way, you can “visually” compare the normal state of the plant with the altered one. Then, you should focus on the methods to extract and analyse primary and specialized (secondary) metabolites. For my personal experience, secondary metabolites are strongly affected by biotic and abiotic stresses. For instance, PAL (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase) genes are triggered by heat, UV and other stressors, causing the synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites including phenylpropanoids and flavonoids. Therefore, I suggest you to start with these metabolites and you could perform HPLC-DAD or the easiest spectrophotometric analysis at 280, 320 and 350 nm to detect and compare the content of phenolic compounds. Then you can move on LC-MS. In my opinion, it is important to set up an appropriate experimental design rather than focusing on which metabolites can give you the best results, since untargeted metabolomics aims to detect as many metabolite as possible without any previous information.
All the best
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As of H202 localisation studies in plant cells can we apply DAB staining for priliminary identifying of H2O2 in yeast cells under abiotic stress condition.?
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I think so
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When we exposed maize plants to abiotic stress, the gene expression of antioxidant genes is increased. Is this result still reasonable?
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I think yes
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Why Epigenetic Mechanisms are the key players in installing plant memory, while the genetic mechanisms comes second?
Thanks in advance.
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Dear Dr. Alfalahi
Hope to answer your question by reading the following article.
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This question is to be looked in particularly context of plants grown in induced abiotic stress
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Please have a look at enclosed PDF...
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Is there any role of abiotic stress like changing temperature? or may be the deficiency of any nutrient?
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Dear Dr. Yuan,
Thanks you very much for the suggestion; actually the pictures from the link you recommended exactly represent the same problem. The discussion there is really useful and gives plenty of explanation regarding the problem.
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There are many researchs about abiotic stress affect plant in recent years but not many project about the low light stress.
So
How low light stress affect plant physiology ?
and how we can do to improve plant resistance again low light stress ?
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It depends on what crop you are investigating. You should first determine if the target plant you want to investigate is short day or long daylength. But generally, plants respond more in terms of yield if they receive more light (in higher wavelength) 600 to 900 nm than in low light.
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Good day fellow researchers,
I am planning to find some methods on how to prevent or mitigate flood stress on plants/crops physically, chemically, biologically or anything that can be suggested? Just want to familiarize some researches on flood stress. Feel free to suggest research works. Thank you!
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Thank you for all the answers and I appreciate your time and wisdom, I am still taking some academic subjects, such as plant stress physiology, water relations in plants and vegetable physiology, this semester which will enhance my understanding towards my planned thesis.
By the way, my proposed crop would be onion (my province is the highest producer) which is a highly susceptible to flood/high moisture especially when "unexpected typhoon" landed during planting season which is a result of climate change in the Philippines. My ideal work plan would be most likely to combat the harmful effects of flood stress such as use of antioxidants/chemicals that may alleviate the stress on the plant. Also, the level of flood stress could be variable depending on the water content/submergence in the soil as well as the amount of time of flood stress condition. Most likely it would be a pot experiment first under greenhouse condition and if the outcome is favorable it may undergo field trial.
These are some of my reading articles:
Waterlogging tolerance of Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) enhanced by exogenous spermidine and spermine
Use of spermidine reduced the oxidative damage in onion seedlings under salinity by modulating antioxidants
It may be a challenged for this crop, also it still a long run (about 5 months) for me to write my proposed thesis, I will still gather more information, related researches and discussion with my adviser. I am gladly to contact all of you to seek for an advice.
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It is well known that proline accumulates significantly as an adaptative response under stress conditions exerting many valuable functions as osmotic adjustment, protein stabilization, ROS scavenging, buffering capacity...
I am wondering if there is any decline in proline content reported under abiotic stess conditions?
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Dear colleague,
You can find the answer of your question in my following puplished paper in JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS:
"Mechanisms underlying toxicity and stimulatory role of single-walled carbon nanotubes in Hyoscyamus niger during drought stress simulated by polyethylene glycol"
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.10.064
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Dear Colleagues,
I would like to know what is the best duration (days) to applicate salinity stress on tree seedlings aged of 60 days? i am confuse, some works said one week, 2 weeks, one month....
Thank you
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Thank you all of you
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please guide me. what is optimum level of SOD, MDA, Proline and Protein in rice leave? and what is their relation under salt stress conditions?
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thanks Dr. Sadam Hussain
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Many of us as scholars and academicians spend countless hours, sometimes consciously or unconsciously without food, exercise and so forth. Continual sitting, glued to our technological research devices leaves many of us with stress from work. Thus, there must be some efficient means of managing these stress for scholars to function properly in their research endeavors while avoiding needless ailments that can retard research progression.
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'Manage' is a key word here. Stress is inevitable. It is integral to existence itself. I guess you are talking about keeping stress under reasonable levels.  To achieve anything you need to stretch and stress up yourself a bit but then find a way of unwinding periodically which is what you are asking us to discuss. Take regular physical exercise. Drink plenty of fluids, especially water in the mornings. Listen to soulful music. Meditate if you can, imageless, wordless, and thought-less. Savour the healing beauties of nature. Bring nature into your living room. E.g install a home made aquarium. Feeding the fish and watching them play can do an academic a world of good. Above all honour your relationships.Catch up with your family and friends.Be present to them and listen to their more to them. These small steps can help a lot to give us balance.
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we are working on improving salinity tolerance in plants  using various strategies. one of the biochemical  indicators of salinity tolerance in plants is the synthesis of the amino acid proline.
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Proline detoxifies the excess reactive oxygen species, improves osmotic adjustment, lends protection to biological membranes, and stabilizes enzymes/proteins. Thus, as expected, proline content in plant leaves increased substantially with the increase in salinity stress. The increase in proline content due to salt stress, as observed in numerous crop plants, is correlative to plant tolerance to salinity. However, we have examined in few plants that foliar application salicylic acid markedly reduced this enhanced proline production. The reduced proline level in salicylic acid treated plants, is indicative of the stress-mitigating role of salicylic acid that might boost plant growth under stress. Reports are also available on up-regulation of proline-biosynthesis enzymes (such as pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase and γ-glutamyl kinase) and down-regulation of proline oxidase activity resulted in the increased proline level, which helped maintain cell turgor under salinity stress.
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hi
im studing salt stress. i need to determine cl concentration in roots and leaves.
please help me to know a correct method.
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thanks a lot for your answers.
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I m interested to know adaptive features of plants in abiotic stress conditions
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Presence of heat shock protein and accumulation of praline are considered as physiologically adaptive features of plants under drought stress, besides detoxifying reactive oxygen species through a series of dismutases..
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I am working on Drought stress tolerance on wheat, and it is found that polyamines play an important role in stress tolerance by modulating different physiological and biochemical process. i want to analyze polyamines content in plant tissues, (leaves, seed, and root). if anybody has protocol. how to measure polyamines content in plant tissues by spectrophotometer.
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your correspondence is highly appreciated 
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I want to do some expression analysis experiment in wheat under drought stress, but a little confused in which method to use.may i go for hydroponics or soil pots or directly germinate the seeds on filter paper.
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I recommend soil pots for phenotypic and genotypic analysis. Hydroponic is also good but you have to make sure you are adding the exact same amount of PEG in each repetition...I think that soil pots could give more material though (leaf surface, root development)....
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1. I'm using NaCl in 20 mM and 150 mM. Aren't they just proper concentration?
2. What's the simplest and the most proper method to test proline?
3. Which kind of absorbantion range should I use to measure the chlorophyl concentration in leaf?
4. Any idea which organ should I test on histology parameter?
5. Is it safe to grow wheat grass in hot temperature (on the scale of 28-30 degrees C)?
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Better to conduct the trial under highest stress i,e, 150 and 200 mM conc.
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I want to investigate the amount of transcripts found of a drought inducable gene in mutant Arabidopsis lines and what to know if it still advisable to use PEG 8000 to mimic drought stress when working on Arabidopsis plants?
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For problems with PEG treatment see http://www.plantstress.com/methods/peg.htm and also the early work by David Lawlor: Lawlor D.W. 1970. Absorption of polyethylene glycols by plants and their effects on plant growth. New Phytol.69:501-514.
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During the natural stress and catastrophes who can be the survival ?
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There are many kinds of stresses, from biotic to abiotic ones... Each one may cause different kinds of damage and effects on survival. which ones are you considering?
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how to get best APX, SOD and CAT enzyme activity in gel for stress treated pea plant?
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tnx sir
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I'm trying to characterise 3 genes presumably related to ammonium transport in Arabidopsis. At the beginning we thought this gene family facilitated NH4+ influx based on previous data from yeast experiments. Therefore we assumed that by losing the genes we should see an increased tolerance to MA (20 mM) in plant growth experiments. However, one of my mutant (now I call it mas1, stand for methyl ammonium sensitive1) showed an increase sensitivity to MA at 20 mM and the double mutant with with mas1 background (mas1xmas2 and mas1xmas3) showed additional sensitivity even at 5 mM MA. I measured the sensitivity by measuring the primary root length. For growth experiment I used plate with modified MS media containing low nitrate (0.05 mM) supplemented with 5 or 20 mM MA.
However I'm not really sure whether this happened as a direct result of MA getting into the cell or it's an indirect results of MA effect on other things. So, by understanding how MA affect growth I could see how my genes work in relation to MA treatments.
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Ammonium triggers lateral root branching.  This paper has some interesting approaches with split plates.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3015122/ 
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