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3D Printing and Intellectual Property Law - Science topic

digital fabrication and its effect on patents, copyrights and trademarks
Questions related to 3D Printing and Intellectual Property Law
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In the new Era of modern technology and research, what are the possibilities of researchers' collaboration with 3D printing options?
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In my fielsd, public health and healthcare, researchers and practitioners will benefit from 3-D printing in a variety of ways. i3-D printing will allow surgeons to improve accuracy in planning cosmetic surgery. Researchers will be able to study the impact of this innovation. The hospitals treating trauma patients can use better visualization of bone senates and use thode images for Telehealth.
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Dear researcher
                           I did a molecular dynamic simulation of wt and mutant protein. Till 10 ns the structure is stable but after 10 ns the mutant diamer is dissociated. I also attached a movie of mutant protein.
I want the answer of these questions
1- Is this realistic condition.
2- Can we predict the diamer dissociation from MDS study.
3- Are this happen due to mutation in protein.
4- Are this is an error of parameters file
Please suggest me. I am new in molecular dynamics.
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Thanks sir,
                  I solved my problem. You are the only one which is solution of all the problems of gromacs. Thankyou so much sir
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An analysis of the effect of TRIPS on developing and least developed countries.
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In my opinion, answer is it could, but doens not happen!
TRIPS provides a general framework. It is up to the signaotories to develop their own IPR legal framework. Many developig countries do not have a functional and enforcable IPR framework. That is why, although many developing countries are  signatoriies to TRIPS, the technology transfer is not happening much!
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I am researching to make a list of all the possible challenges associated with 3D printing of electronics and why they haven't been in the mainstream as a manufacturing tool using direct-write technologies.
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This actually is my research area. You can see some of what we are doing here:
Direct write is a reasonably mature method capable of depositing multiple materials. I think nScrypt is one of the best and most dominant equipment manufacturers in this area, although other vendors exist. The major problem is that dispensed materials must be in a "paste" like condition to be dispensed. Binders and other compounds need to be removed by baking, sintering, UV curing, etc. This tends to lower the conductivity of metals and make dielectrics a bit lossier than with other manufacturing methods. Producing 3D structures is also difficult with low viscosity materials, but still possible using a variety of techniques. We've made a variety of 3D structures with the method.
If you follow our website, we are on schedule to make a significant announcement later this summer for work in this area. It is very exciting and I wish I could say more.
Hope this helps!
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Impact of 3D printer.
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It is very hard to know how these technologies will evolve. Recall that they are only the continuation of all conmputer driven manufacturing, which has existed for several decades.
The major issues will be availability and cost of the machinery and of the raw material. Both could become dirt cheap at some point. Remember that the availability of personnal computers in 1980 drastically changed the economics, sociology and even technology of computers. My smartphone is probably more powerful than the computer that was running my whole institute 40 years ago. And I guess the price ratio is probably in the tens of thousands, not including the people needed to run it.
Regarding legal aspects, these technical and economic changes completely altered the foundation of copyright and made obsolete some assumptions at the core of copyright, though this is being denied by some cultural industries, as it destroys their busines model, based on precisely on capital investment costs that digitisation has made obsolete. One of the obvious consequences is the open access and free software mouvements.
I discuss this in a paper: "Orphan Works and the Google Book Search Settlement: An International Perspective" http://www.datcha.net/ecrits/liste/orphan-gbs/orphan-gbs.pdf (this is a copy of the journal publication, with a typo corrected). See in particular footnote 38.
I also have a much shorter paper in French on these issues: http://www.datcha.net/ecrits/liste/orphan-bnf/patrimoral.pdf
As the price of equipment (more than raw material) goes down, the same can happen for manufacturing. And this may impact patents rather than copyright. The reason that equipment price is the more important factor is that it requires an up front investment independent of the number of copies produced.
If you are interested, I discussed briefly the issue some 10 years ago in the section before last of a paper on software patenting. Briefly because at the time it was almost science-fiction. The paper was published in French, but there is an almost complete (with a few extras) English translation.
"Brevetabilité du logiciel : le point de vue d'un chercheur en informatique" http://www.datcha.net/ecrits/liste/arcelor/BLang-final+ref-2007.pdf Publication : "Brevet Innovation Intérêt général ­ Le brevet pourquoi et pour faire quoi ?", Actes du Colloque de Louvain la Neuve, organisé par la Chaire Arcelor, publié sous la direction de Bernard Remiche, ISBN13 : 9782 804424480 , pp. 385413, Larcier, 2006. http://editions.larcier.com/livre/?GCOI=28044100155480 .
Translation in English:
"Software Patentability: a computer research scientist's view" http://www.datcha.net/ecrits/liste/recife-bresil/48.pdf
But there have been many other publications on this topic since then.