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A while ago I attended a course titled "Contemporary Themes in History" which was essentially events of the 20th century, however, thought thematically. What I'm looking for is the particular textbook which followed the same structure. and it had hand picked interesting chapters such as on: cultural revolution, feminism, Islamic fundamentalism.
I have been trying to search for it on Google search engine, however, I'm totally incapable of finding anything related to "textbooks" only some results for popular non-academic books!
Any advice/suggestion are appreciated.
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See there is lot of books available regarding 20th century. But it didn't contain the same theme of the conference that you have been attended. May be they could collect the theme by referring so many books
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Two basic types of reactions were designated by Ernst Kretschmer as "biological radicals": “Totstellreflex” (feigning death) and “Bewegungssturm” (motion storm), published in 1923: "Hysterie, Reflex und Instinkt", Thieme, Leipzig), sometimes also called “hysterical hypokinesis and hyperkinesis” (Svorad, D:.AMA Arch Neur Psych 1957;77(5):533-539).
Thanatosis in spiders and insects, “playing possum, can often work”, serving as a protection strategy and “changing with external or internal conditions”. (Map of Life - University of Cambridge: http://www.mapoflife.org/topics/topic_368), see attachment.
Ich would like to know more about this fascinating phenomenon.
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Alexander Uspensky worked his way up from a seminarian and a policeman to a deputy commandant of the Moscow Kremlin and a high-ranking NKVD officer. During his career, he managed to work in the Urals, in Siberia, in the Ukrainian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic and received ill fame even in the punitive organs.
In 1938 he received a further promotion - transfer to Moscow. But it is unlikely that Ouspensky was happy about this - such "promotions" almost always meant a quick arrest and execution. So he faked his own suicide by writing a suicide note with the words: "Look for a corpse in the Dnieper." His tunic and cap were found in the river, so at first he was really mistaken for the deceased.
Ouspensky fled to Voronezh, where he lived according to previously prepared forged documents and pretended to be a worker named Ivan Shmashkovsky. But the deception was revealed and the fugitive was detained, after which he was shot.
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The available research of early 20th century history of architecture in North Macedonia, suggests that probably the first female architect / architectural designer was Elena Bokus (born in 1893 at location unknown).  She had apparently practiced in Skopje during the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovens, later Kingdom of Yugoslavia, and there is a record of a house designed by her in 1923.  However, there is no information about her work or wearbout after 1923.
The surname Bokus is quite unique for this part of the world, therefore any information on her work, whereabout, or potential country of origin, based on the surname, will be appreciated.
Thank you for your assistance in this matter.
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She lived and worked in Skopje. She designed individual family houses. Although her period of work coincides with the extremely rich work of contemporaries Rudolf Vosta, Boris Dutov, Ferdows Kraus and Gligorije Tomic, only the project for:
1923 - The individual family house (P + 1) of Jovan Taskovic on st. "Hajduk Velko" ("Aegean") in Skopje.
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The British periodical "Truth" published in its 1890 Christmas edition a cartoon entitled "The Kaiser's Dream" [1]. In the cartoon, the Kaiser imagines a transformed Europe. Most of the nations which in 1890 were led by crowned heads had been replaced by republics. Some republics lay within familiar borders (e.g. "British Republic"). Others were fragmented (e.g. the "German Republics"). But Russia had been transformed into a "desert" ("Russian Desert"). Was the 1917 Russian Revolution the first stage in the roll-out of a long-planned Western regime-change project? If so, was the project's aim to use communism as a means of impeding Russian industrialization?
More proximate is the circumstance that in April 1917 Germany facilitated the transit across Germany in a sealed railway carriage of Lenin and other Bolsheviks. From Germany's wartime perspective, they were enemy aliens. Upon Lenin's arrival in Petrograd, he called for Russia's immediate withdrawal from the war. Russian withdrawal would have the strategic effect of enabling Germany to concentrate its efforts on the Western Front. The related Treaty of Brest-Litovsk followed in March 1918. By its terms, Russia not only withdrew from the war but also ceded industrialized regions to Germany. Was Lenin a German agent?
It is arguable that the Britain and France fomented the First World War with the intention of using Germany as a sword with which to strike at Russia, their nominal ally in the Triple Entente. Did Germany, having been lured into war, then opportunistically exploit the Bolsheviks as a means of closing the onerous Eastern Front?
Thanks in advance for shedding light on these and related matters.
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The simple answer to most of your questions is no. The Bolshevik Revolution was not a long-planned regime change project by the West.
To start, the role of Germany in Lenin going to Russia was largely peripheral. Outside of allowing the sealed train to pass through Germany on its way to Russia, that was extent of their role and this largely seems to be the consensus of the field today. There is no evidence that Lenin or the Bolsheviks were directly sent by, or funded by, Germany. [1] When Lenin arrived, his calling for the end of war was something that was in line with his long-held beliefs. He even broke with the Second International, declaring it ideologically bankrupt, when at the outbreak of war, many socialist parties supported their nation’s war effort instead of promoting pacifism or turning it into a revolutionary wave. On top of that, it had a pragmatic purpose – much of Russia was sick of the war and this was a way of the Bolsheviks to reach the people. It certainly could be seen as benefiting the Germans in their war effort, but that was more an unintended result, not the motivation.[2]
The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, signed in March 1918, was something the Bolsheviks signed reluctantly and largely under duress. When the negotiations began in late 1917, they wanted to bring all warring parties to the negotiating table and develop a peace that was free from indemnities, free from reparations and enforced self-determination. When the Entente Powers refused to attend, the Bolsheviks attempted to sign such a peace solely with the Central Powers. They delayed, however, with hopes of revolution coming to Austria and Germany, having leaflets passed out on the streets of Berlin and Vienna, although to little effect. The Central Powers eventually become sick of the delays and offered a peace on their terms. Leon Trotsky leaves the negotiations, declaring the Bolshevik war effort over, showing the naivety of the Bolsheviks to European diplomacy. The Germans continue their campaign into Russia and Lenin forces his party to accept a harsh peace to defend the revolution and allow the Bolsheviks to focus on the growing civil war. [3]
Finally, the Allied Intervention was something that developed once forces were on the ground. The research of Brock Millman argues that many British soldiers made decisions far from central command to get involved. [4] DeWitt Clinton Poole, whose reminiscences are now available in published form, an American diplomat in Russia at the time of the revolution, makes clear the Entente Powers genuinely wanted to reopen the Eastern Front and get involved in the Russian Civil War for a number of reasons, all a result of circumstance. [5]
Finally, to throw another wrench into such a theory as you describe is the very limited role that Britain plays in the coming of the First World War, largely deciding to get involved after a series of agonizing meetings, none of which ensured that the British would enter until the very end. France can be argued to have played a role in ensuring the Russians would respond antagonistically to any action by Austro-Hungary or Germany in the July Crisis, and supporting them the entire way. Christopher Clark emphasizes this in his work. At the same time, it would be difficult to suggest Germany was lured into the war as they were equally willing to consider military means and openly stated such to their allies. If there was any way to suggest Germany was “lured” into the war, it would be in their response to Russian mobilization. [6] So even that part of the theory does not seem to stand scrutiny.
I hope this answers some of the questions you had and I’m happy to respond to others too!
[1] See S.A. Smith, Russia in Revolution: An Empire in Crisis 1890-1928 (Oxford University Press, 2017), 110-111.
[2] See Lars T. Lih, Lenin (Reaktion Books, 2011).
[3] Some of my research details this. See The Communist International, Anti-Imperialism and Racial Equality in British Dominions (Routledge, 2018). Also see Michael Jabara Carley, A Silent Conflict: A Hidden History of Early Soviet-Western Relations (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), 11-13.
[4] Brock Millman, “The Problem with Generals: Military Observers and the Origins of the Intervention in Russia and Persia, 1917-18,” Journal of Contemporary History 33(2): 291-320.
[5] DeWitt Clinton Poole, An American Diplomat in Bolshevik Russia, edited by Lorraine M. Lees and William S. Rodner (University of Wisconsin Press, 2014).
[6] Christopher Clark, The Sleepwalkers: How Europe went to War in 1914 (Harper Perennial, 2012).
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Hi,
I'm looking for sources which present the Arab Revolt in Palestine (1936-9) from the Arab and British points of view. So far, I have been able to find Swedenburg's "Memories of Revolt" and Kanafani's "The 1936-39 Revolt in Palestine".
Will greatly appreciate recommendations!
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Charles Anderson - Will the Real Palestinian Peasantry Please Sit Down? Towards a New History of British Rule in Palestine, 1917-1936
Sheree Roth - Were the Arabs Indigenous to Mandatory Palestine?
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I am especially interested in known examples of bridges, as well as in the training of the constuctors involved.
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Galata Bridge in Istanbul is a great example.
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Special report by His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Council of the League of Nations on the progress of 'Iraq during the period 1920-1931 (pdf)
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It would appear that the document you are looking for has the reference  TNA/ CO 730/167/14; Report to the League of Nations on the progress of Iraq under the mandate.
It has not been digitised so you you will need to either order a pdf direct from the NA, or hire a researcher to obtain it for you
Could you supply the original source supplying the reference to this document, and it's context, just to confirm the details?
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I have read a couple of book chapters about the VHP in Denmark and something on the US and UK. But I wonder of there has been done any good research about the VHP or the Sangh Parivar as a whole in other European countries.
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Dear Ivo, this is extremely kind of you. Thank you very much. 
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I was wondering why Poland, a land rich in culture and history endowed with specific identity, was uncomfortable for the great powers at the beginning of the 19th century, to the extent that, with reference to Germany and Russia, it was just supposed to be deleted as national identity.
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I assume you are asking about the 1934 German-Polish non-aggression pact.  This was most likely done because, 1) Poland was concerned about Germany rearming in violation of the Versailles treaty and was hoping for some measure assurance that it was safe, and  2) because Germany wanted to calm fears related to their rearming.  It was a purely diplomatic move to buy Germany time to complete their rearming to reclaim their pre-1919 borders. 
As to why Germany invaded Poland, probably two reasons, the most obvious of which was because it needed to in order to have a direct border with Russia for its planned invasion of Russia.  But also, keep in mind that after WWI Germany and Russia both were forced to give up millions of square miles of territory to recreate a Polish state, which had not existed for over 100 years, and neither country was too happy about that.
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I'm looking for sources that discuss American Indian student involvement.
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Some primary sources may be found on Calisphere (photos): http://calisphere.cdlib.org/item/4fb28b83090fe6eb91d938928fd62368/
Although there are no online items, the San Francisco Public Library has a substantial collection on the event:
Good luck in your research!
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I would like to write a paper about Langmuir's thesis related to anti-Semitism. It seems to me that Harari's book (Sapiens) extends Langmuir's definition to the prejudices against other minorities. What is your opinion? How would you reason for or against this idea?
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Think that one part of the Thesis of Harari is, that man was an "unimportant animal 100.000 years ago". We know now fairly well, that even homo ergaster was no unimportant animal. 400.000 years ago by the first known cemetary in Sima de los Huesos (Spain) it could be shown he cared until death for ill and handicapped ones. Auditorium Cave in Bhimbetka (Madhya Pradesh / India) Shows artistic expressions like snake lines and cupulas, dated  700.000 - 290.000 years. The first Stone Venuses from Israel and Marocco both could be dated because of vulcanic eruptions above and beneath to between 800.000 - 230.000 and 500.000 - 200.000. Aerodynamic perfect spears have been used in Schöningen (Germany) 400.000 years ago and modern world Champions say nowadays spears are not better. And we crossed the sea in Indonesia to reach the Islands of Flores and Timor already 850.000 to 700.000 years ago. For this you Need a Kind of boat and language to plan, perform and act together. This is no unimportant animal, which can do this and thus Hararis main hypothesis is dead. 
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The Staff College at Camberley (and its counterpart at Quetta)  destroyed many records early in the Second World War; its successor organisation, the Joint Command and Staff College at the UK Defence Academy, has provided me with their list, but it is very incomplete - especially for instructors.  Some details can be derived from newspapers such as The Times, but this is piecemeal.  I am seeking to determine how far the College acted as a "talent pool" for later selection and advancement for those who attended. 
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Tom,
Thank you - all stones need to be turned in pursuit of this one, so I appreciate the suggestions which I will follow up.
Regards
Phil
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The WWII co-operation of exiled political representations assembled in London counts to my research subjects. Hardly a revelation: the picture is complicated, probably little more disappointing than one is likely to expect when entering the ground. In a manuscript which I hope to publish soon I conclude:
"The story sketched in this article documents how difficult it was for small European nations, despite a common enemy and a shared meeting-place, to find solid ground for mutual understanding. ...The activities of the exiles were first and foremost directed to the preservation of their threatened nationsʼ identity, state, cultural or other. Thus, much of the communication between them was condemned to fail or to get lost ʻin translationʼ of cultural codes."
Intercultural communication is no doubt the issue I address here. Unfortunately, most literature I came across studies communication between "Great Cultures". This is still useful but my issue - intercultural communication within one (European, Western) culture - seems to lay pretty below the prevalent level of analysis.
Any reading suggestions? 1900-1950 scope will be appreciated.
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Figuring out foreigners by Craig Storti.
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I remember finding the invaluable ADAP collection online (read only). Since I have forgotten to save bookmarks prior to a general reinstall of my laptop, I have no clue which Germany-based digital repository it was. Does anyone know?
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Go to the German Institute as well as the German Marshall Fund.
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Im loking to know the urbanism plans for Argel betwin 1963-1965
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I really don´t know about an answer. But the identification between both revolutions was very hard very son and the linked a lot. Cuba have a high level in architecture and urbanism and Argelia lost all the french colonial knowledge in this matter after the Independence. On the othe hand Cuba practiced since 1960 a very strong international copperation policy, helping some  African colonies fighting for Independence and to build the new states (Angola, Mozambique,...) Anyway I can give you a email address of mu relative and colleague from La Habana Universtity who probably can help you: felix@frc.uh.cu to find some information about it.
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Does anyone know where I can find a reliable dataset on income inequality for Latin American countries from 1900-1970? In particular, I'm looking for Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina, but would be interested in other countries too. 
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In the case of Chile you can look at:
The paper constructs a annual measures for 1957-1998 based on on an occupation and wage survey in Greater Santiago
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I would like to indications of books and texts that talk about the A-bomb. Can be empirical or theoretical texts, any help will be welcome. I am concerned to understand the different ways to talk about it, both by historiography and by the official history and the memory of the people involved (especially in the United States of America and Japan).
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Barton J. Bernstein, “Understanding the Atomic Bomb and the Japanese Surrender: Missed Opportunities, Little-Known Near Disasters, and Modern Memory,” in Diplomatic History (1995) 19 (2): pp.227-273.
J. Samuel Walker, “Recent Literature on Truman's Atomic Bomb Decision: A Search for Middle Ground,” in Diplomatic History (2005) 29 (2): pp.311-334.
Gar Alperovitz, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb, and the Architecture of an American Myth (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995). Also read the reviews by Brian L. Villa and John Bonnett, “Understanding Indignation: Gar Alperovitz, Robert Maddox, and the Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and Weapons for Victory,” in Reviews in American History, Volume 24, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp.529-536
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The business operated in Manhattan from the Early National - post Civil War period and dealt in hardware and plate glass imports.  It was located on Maiden Lane (94 Maiden Lane but included at times adjacent buildings).
Besides the landmark study on the building and brief references to CVS Roosevelt in various secondary sources on the Roosevelt family, can anyone lead me to any primary sources? I am curious (and question the accuracy of the statement) about how secondary source claims that the company achieved a monopoly on the import of plate glass. I want to understand how the business operated. I know family members sometimes traveled to take orders but did they use jobbers, and how did they operate?
The company received most of their shipments from Liverpool but bought glass from France, England, and Germany. How did that work? Did they have a representative abroad? When plate glass arrived in New York, how was it transported and stored? Did they only order by the job or did they keep an inventory in their maiden lane warehouse? Was the plate glass stored on upper floors and the office on the ground floor? Different sources say the plate glass import part of the business was sold to the Briish firm in 1876 (date?). Which firm?  How did they advertise their wares?  Also, family members sometimes operated additional hardware import companies including one titled Roosevelt & Company. Were they rivals or connected?
Any sources (business or otherwise) about CVS Roosevelt (Cornelius V. S. Roosevelt, or Cornelius van Schaack -- sometimes spelled Schaick) would be most appreciated. He had a "mansion" on Union Square at Broadway and 14th St. until his death in 1871.  
He had a son and a grandson with the same name unfortunately.  Also any info on the business dealings of Theodore Roosevelt Sr (the presdient's father).
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Franklin Delano Roosevelt
When was FDR born?
Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born on January 30, 1882, at the family home, "Springwood," in Hyde Park, New York.
How did the Roosevelt and Delano families make their money?
The Roosevelt family was New York based and involved in commerce, banking and insurance, shipbuilding and seafaring, urban real estate and landholding. Although a lawyer by training, James Roosevelt's interests were in business where he was a respected figure in the field of finance, transportation (railroads), and philanthropy.
The Delanos were a New England seafaring and mercantile family. FDR's maternal grandfather, Warren Delano II, was in the China trade in which he made and lost several fortunes.
Was FDR an only child?
FDR was the only child of James Roosevelt and his second wife, Sara Delano. Franklin had an older half brother, James Roosevelt Roosevelt (1854-1927), born to his father and his first wife, Rebecca Howland, who died in 1876.
When did FDR's father die?
James Roosevelt was born in 1828 and died on December 8, 1900 in New York City at the age of 72. Franklin was eighteen and a freshman at Harvard College.
When did FDR's mother die?
Sara Delano Roosevelt was born in 1854 and died on September 7, 1941 at the family home "Springwood," in Hyde Park, New York at the age of 87. Franklin died less than four years later.
Where did FDR go to school?
In September 1896, at age fourteen, Franklin entered Groton School, a small boarding school in Massachusetts which prepared sons of wealthy and prominent families for college. Before entering Groton, Franklin had a series of governesses and tutors.
What was FDR's first job?
In the autumn of 1907 Franklin became an apprentice lawyer with the Wall Street firm of Carter, Ledyard and Milburn. It was a typical arrangement at the time-no salary the first year and then a small one to start.
What was FDR's first public office?
FDR was elected New York State Senator from Dutchess, Columbia and Putnam counties in 1910 and re-elected for a second term in 1912. He served only a few months of the second term before President Woodrow Wilson appointed him Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1913.
Was FDR ever in the military?
No. When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Franklin held the civilian post of Assistant Secretary of the Navy. He was eager to enlist, but President Wilson urged against it, citing his important service in the Navy Department.
During World War II, President Roosevelt served as Commander-in-Chief of the United States Armed Forces.
When did FDR run for the Vice-presidency?
In 1920 the Democratic Party nominated Ohio Governor James M. Cox for President and Franklin D. Roosevelt for Vice President. They were defeated by Republicans Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge.
When was FDR elected Governor of New YorkState?
FDR was elected Governor of New York State in 1928 and 1930 for two two-year terms.
Who was Lucy Mercer?
Lucy Page Mercer, daughter of a well-connected Washington family living in reduced financial circumstances, was hired as Eleanor Roosevelt's social secretary in 1914 to assist with the heavy social responsibilities of the wife of a sub-cabinet secretary. In September 1918, Eleanor discovered love letters from Lucy to Franklin and Eleanor offered Franklin a divorce, which he declined for political reasons. In the end, Eleanor agreed to preserve the marriage and Franklin promised never to see Lucy again.
In 1920, Lucy Mercer married Winthrop Rutherfurd, a wealthy widower. Despite his promise to Eleanor, Franklin and Lucy continued to maintain contact. Lucy was present at the Little White House, Warm Springs, Georgia, when President Roosevelt died in 1945.
When did FDR die and what was the cause of his death?
President Roosevelt died of cerebral hemorrhage on April 12, 1945 at the Little White House, his cottage at Warm Springs, Georgia, the rehabilitation center for the treatment of polio that he founded.
What events and ceremonies occurred during FDR's funeral?
On the morning of April 13, 1945, the Presidents' casket was carried to the railroad station at Warm Springs, Georgia, accompanied by a procession of 2,000 soldiers from Fort Benning. Moving no faster than 35 miles per hour, the train passed through the Carolinas and Virginia, arriving in Washington, DC on April 14. All along the way sorrowful citizens turned out to pay their respects to the passing funeral train. President Truman, members of the immediate family, and high-ranking government officials met the funeral train at the Union Station.
Full military honors were rendered in the procession from the railroad station to the White House through the streets lined with units of the nation's armed forces and the grieving public. Behind the casket two flag bearers bore the American flag and the presidential standard. At the White House, the casket was placed in the East Room where the funeral services were conducted at 4:00 p.m. The Episcopal Funeral Service lasted twenty-three minutes.
That evening the casket was removed from the White House and taken in a small procession of soldiers and police to the Union Station for the trip to Hyde Park, New York. Again mournful citizens turned out to witness the passing train. The morning of April 15 the funeral train arrived at a siding on the Hudson River four miles from the Roosevelt home. The casket was transferred to a gun carriage and driven to the Roosevelt estate along a route lined with soldiers, sailors and marines. The caisson was preceded by a military band and a battalion of West Point cadets and followed by limousines containing President Truman and the Roosevelt family. Full Military honors were rendered from the train to the burial site. Great numbers of ordinary Americans young and old traveled to Hyde Park to attend the funeral.
Interment was in the Rose Garden at the estate in Hyde Park. The rector of St. James Episcopal Church read the burial services, three volleys were fired over the grave and taps were sounded as the casket was lowered into its final resting place.
What lifelong hobby did FDR pursue?
Stamp collecting was one of FDR's lifelong hobbies. His interest began when he was eight years old and his mother passed her collection on to him. He enjoyed stamps, he said, because of their link with geography and history, not for their intrinsic value. While recovering from polio, he spent many bedridden hours arranging and annotating thousands of specimens. As President, there was scarcely a day when he did not spend some time with his collection.
At his death, his personal stamp collection numbered over 1,200,000 stamps, 80% of which was of little value-"scrap"" as the President called it. The collection was sold at public auction in accordance with his wishes and realized $228,000.00. The stamps he received officially from foreign governments were not sold, but are a part of the holdings of the Roosevelt Library.
What were FDR's "vital statistics"?
Born: January 30, 1882 at 9 pm, weighing 10 lbs
Height: 6'2"
Weight: Approximately 182 lbs.
Complexion: Fair to ruddy
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Grey-blue
Voice: Tenor
Shirt Size: 16 3/4 neck, 35 sleeve
Hat Size: 7 and 3/8
Shoes: Size 12
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Or something that deals specifically with how they were treated and their conditions.
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It depends what you mean by 'alien internment', but I am aware of two publications by fascists in the UK which deal with or touch upon the internment of fascists in camps where they were held alongside 'alien' refugees, 'suspects', etc (which must have created a great deal of tension). The first is a pamphlet originally called 'The Hell of Ham Common', which purports to be an inside account of conditions in Camp 020, the wartime British interrogation centre located at Latchmere House, in south-west London, near the village of Ham and Richmond Park. Camp 020 briefly held some fascists and also some 'suspect' aliens, before they were transferred to other more general internment camps, such as Ascot and the Isle of Man. Camp 020 then became mainly devoted to interrogating captured German spies. The other publication is by fascist activist R.R. Bellamy, called 'We Marched With Mosley', which is the 'official' internal history of the British Union of Fascists (BUF), and touches on the period of internment. It has been reprinted recently by a neo-fascist publication house. Naturally, both publications, while containing very useful material in some ways, should also be treated with utmost caution by the historian.
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I am currently researching for my dissertation on the topic of Military Medical Evacuation during the Korean War and the above question is the basis to the paper. One of the main revolutions came about with the ability to airlift wounded soldiers via helicopter, however, the most commonly known advancement is the Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH). Nevertheless, there was also the use of military vehicles, railroads, and military hospital ships, all of which seem to be overlooked by the majority. It is these three areas that intrigue me the most, how did they revolutionize Military Medical Evacuation?
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It is also important to point out the vast toplogogical differences in the various theaters of battle in the Korean War vs Vietnam.
The Korean penisula is very mountainous and MASH units were often located in valleys and then served as regoinal faciliteis for the wounded.  In Vietnam, many battle fields were in river deltas or other low lying areas and that facilitated evauction, via helicopeter, to nearby hospital ships, which was not much of an option in the Korean War.
 
When the Vietnam battles spilled over or infiltrarted or invaded or whatever, Cambodia, evac of the wounded was much more challenging.
 
So I think and important dimension of your research would involve the actual topological and geographical details of the various battle fronts and the facility at which wounded could be evaced either during or shortly after the battle
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I am looking into the anglicisation of Jewish dietary tastes in First World War London.
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There has been an intense debate, even today, on the existence of a proper fascist culture in Italy during the 20s and 30s: Those who think there was no fascist culture, since fascism failed in its attempt of cultural renewal, and those who claim the success of fascist cultural transformation, since fascism made use of culture as a political tool of modernization.
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not during but afterwards in Italian political life.