Zhonghui Guan's research while affiliated with University of California, San Francisco and other places

Publications (16)

Article
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Microgliosis is a hallmark of many neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, seizure, traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, and peripheral and optic nerve injuries. Recent studies have shown that the newly self-renewed microglia have specific neurological functions. However, the mechanism of adult microglia proliferation rem...
Article
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Human MYCN is an oncogene amplified in neuroblastoma and many other tumors. Both human MYCN and mouse Mycn genes are important in embryonic brain development, but their functions in adult healthy nerve system are completely unknown. Here, with Mycn-eGFP mice and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that Mycn was expressed in specific brain regions of youn...
Article
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Molecular and cellular interactions among spinal dorsal horn neurons and microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system, contribute to the induction and maintenance of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury. Emerging evidence also demonstrates that reciprocal interactions between macrophages and nociceptive sensory neuron...
Article
Background and objectives Access through the foramen ovale (FO) is essential in performing trigeminal ganglion injection, glycerol rhizolysis, balloon compression, and radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFT) to treat idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN). However, identification of the FO under fluoroscopy can be difficult and time-consuming, and th...
Article
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Paralleling the activation of dorsal horn microglia after peripheral nerve injury is a significant expansion and proliferation of macrophages around injured sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Here we demonstrate a critical contribution of DRG macrophages, but not those at the nerve injury site, to both the initiation and maintenance of t...
Article
Although microglia have been implicated in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, the manner by which injured sensory neurons engage microglia remains unclear. We found that peripheral nerve injury induced de novo expression of colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) in injured sensory neurons. CSF1 was transported to the spinal cord, where it targeted...
Article
Decreased spinal cord GABAergic inhibition is a major contributor to the persistent neuropathic pain that can follow peripheral nerve injury. Recently, we reported that restoring spinal cord GABAergic signaling by intraspinal transplantation of cortical precursors of GABAergic interneurons from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can rev...
Article
Full-text available
There is continuing controversy relating to the primary afferent neurotransmitter that conveys itch signals to the spinal cord. Here, we investigated the DRG and spinal cord expression of the putative primary afferent-derived "itch" neurotransmitter, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). Using ISH, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry, we conclude that GRP is...

Citations

... MYCN gene amplification (MYCN-amp) is the strongest prognostic marker for the high-risk aggressive NB phenotype [9,10]. MYCN is a proto-oncogene encoding n-Myc located on the short arm of chromosome 2 (band 2p24) and plays crucial roles in the human fetal brain during neurogenesis [10,11]. MYCN dysregulation is observed in NB and other neurological malignancies such as glioblastoma, retinoblastoma, medulloblastoma and ependymoma [10,11]. ...
... Human imaging studies and preclinical models of neuropathic pain suggest that following nerve injury, cellular and molecular interactions of macrophages and microglia with spinal dorsal horn neurons contribute to the establishment of chronic pain [180,181]. One of the molecular mechanisms involved is activation of the CSF-1/CSF-1R/DAP12 pathway [181]. ...
... The imaging modalities included fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and ultrasound. Fluoroscopy imaging is a simple and rapid method, but the related landmark may be blocked through X-ray imaging due to anatomical variants of the foramen ovale and patient position [15]. The use of neuronavigation for cannulating the foramen ovale through real-time CT, intraoperative CT, and intraoperative CT with MRI fusion is currently a popular imaging tool. ...
... Even large molecules, such as antisense oligonucleotides and adenoassociated viruses, can impact the dorsal root ganglion after intrathecal delivery (see below). (2) in vitro studies have demonstrated that opiate can alter the excitability of the neuronal cell body (80,81), and (3) increasing evidence suggests that the excitability of the DRG neurons can lead to an enhanced afferent traffic (82). ...
... 9 Reduction of macrophages in DRG can relieve mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. 17 Besides, Some new studies show that receptors such as melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are also helpful. 18,19 Here, we briefly reviewed recent studies of lncRNAs in neuropathic pain, focusing on different rodent neuropathic pain models. ...
... The microglia were thought to be a kind of immune cells located in the central nervous system [18][19][20][21]. Studies have found that microglia in the spinal cord were significantly activated in various pain models [22][23][24][25][26][27]. The inhibition of microglial activation can relieve inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, cancer pain and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy [25][26][27][28]. ...
... These results suggest that the antiallodynic effects of KDS2010 are produced by the restoration of GABAergic synaptic transmission, with the ROS decrease reflected in restored IPSC frequency rather than GABA A Rs activity in SG neurons. This idea is in line with the suggestion that GABAergic precursor cell transplants reverse PTXinduced mechanical hypersensitivity [36]. ...
... Several groups found that the expression of Grp transcripts in normal mouse DRG and TG neurons is almost undetectable, as shown by in situ hybridization, RT-PCR, and RNA sequencing (Fleming et al., 2012;Goswami et al., 2014;Li et al., 2018;Mishra et al., 2012;Nguyen et al., 2017;Usoskin et al., 2015). The GRP antibody used to show its expression in mouse DRG neurons displays cross reactivity to substance P (Solorzano et al., 2015). Instead, Grp is highly expressed in a population of spinal cord DH interneurons that function in itch-sensing pathways (Albisetti et al., Fleming et al., 2012;Kiguchi et al., 2020;Mishra and Hoon, 2013;Pagani et al., 2019) and may serve as a "leaky gate" for nociceptive signals . ...