Yanwar Pribadi's research while affiliated with SULTAN MAULANA HASANUDDIN BANTEN and other places

Publications (26)

Article
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This article discusses the intertwinement of beauty and piety among middle-class Muslim women in urban Indonesia through the use of cosmetics and beauty treatments within the broader trends of ḥalāl lifestyle. It uses an anthropological approach with case studies in Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia, and Serang, the capital city of Banten Prov...
Article
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This article discusses the ways in which citizens have enhanced agency through informal and polite claims-making. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in a village in West Java, this article argues that citizens tend to pressure the authorities in polite, personal, and highly informal ways to deal with state institutions and gain access to public servic...
Article
Leonard C. Sebastian, Syafiq Hasyim and Alexander R. Arifianto (eds). 2021. Rising Islamic Conservatism in Indonesia: Islamic Groups and Identity Politics. London and New York: Routledge.This volume discusses the rise of Islamic conservatism in Indonesia that is opposed to the values of pluralism, tolerance, and religious freedom. The authors argue...
Article
This article discusses the relationship between Sekolah Islam (Salafism-influenced Islamic schools) and urban middle-class Muslims. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in the City of Serang (Kota Serang), near Jakarta, this paper argues that these conservative and puritan Muslims demonstrate their Islamic identity politics through their engagement with...
Conference Paper
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What does radical actually mean is highly diverse. Radical literally means “pertaining to roots”, from the Latin radix. The use of “radical” in Islamic and political studies marks a desire to reach down to the very roots of something in order to change it, or reform it entirely. In Indonesia, radical Islamic groups are associated with a group of pe...
Article
Today, Islamist groups in Indonesia are apprehensive with Islam Nusantara, a catch-all term to refer to various expressions of localised Islam and socio-political thoughts and attitudes propagated by the country’s largest Muslim organisation, the Nahdlatul Ulama (NU). In response, the proponents of Islam Nusantara call for the unity of Indonesian...
Article
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Tulisan ini bertujuan untuk mengeksplorasi dan menjelaskan hubungan timbal balik atau koeksistensi antara komodifikasi Islam dan ekonomi pasar pada masyarakat Muslim Banten di Kota Serang dan Kota Cilegon. Penelitian antropologi politik ini menggunakan metode etnografi dengan fokus pada studi kasus lapangan (fieldwork case study) di Kota Serang dan...
Article
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Local-level leaders in contemporary Indonesia have involved in the country’s turbulent politics. The regent of Purwakarta (2008-2018), Dedi Mulyadi, employed, for the most part, culture-based political preferences develop his territory. In doing so, he frequently encountered with various forms of Islamization of politics, hindering his strategies t...
Article
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This paper explores the dynamics of socio-religious interactions among the inter-ethnic fishermen community in the former seaport of the Sultanate of Banten, i.e. in the Karangantu Port, Serang, Banten. The study focuses on the socio-religious interactions between migrants and local residents, and among the migrants themselves. This paper more broa...
Article
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This paper by and large explores state-society relations and for the most part discusses the Indonesian government's plans to 'modernize' Madura during the New Order administration and how a number of kyai responded to these plans. Specifically, it is concerned with a conflict between the state and the kyai in the Suramadu Bridge Affair, particular...
Article
By exploring the sources of authority, the characteristics, the sociopolitical world, the roles and the relationships between village leaders, this paper shows that there have been only a few changes in local politics in western Madura, Indonesia, since the 1998 political reformation. In fact, despite the continual reformation processes, the circum...
Article
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This paper deals with the socio-political roles of jawara in Banten as both traditional and modern leaders during the New Order period 1966-1998. This paper shows that Banten is not only an area of piety, but also an area of tradition and violence in different forms. In the colonial period, jawara mounted resistance—along with ulama—aimed at overth...
Article
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p>This paper addresses three institutions in Madurese santri culture: the pesantren (Islamic traditional education system), the Nahdlatul Ulama, and the kiai (tradisional Islamic authority). These three elements have characterised and become central part of both Islam and politics in Madura. The issues are raised in this paper: the nature of pesant...
Article
This article deals with the roles of kiai in Madura as both traditional and modern leaders. I will look at the principal ways in which kiai, who symbolize Islamic leadership, have characterized Islam and politics in Madura by arranging themselves in conflicts and accommodations within Madurese society. In doing so, I will portray two prominent Madu...
Article
Full-text available
The central purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamic relationship between Javanese strongmen and religious leaders in search of power. Two groups of strongmen --jago in Central and East Java and jawara in Banten-- and religious leaders, such as kyai, tarekat teachers and guru ngaji are the subjects of this discussion. I present two groups of...

Citations

... Salafi researchers such as Noorhaidi Hasan (2008), Sunarwoto (Sunarwoto 2021), Muhammad Sani Umar and Mark Woordward (2020), Yanwar Pribadi (2022) and others have discussed a lot of Salafism in Indonesia on the Salafi movement, proselytising, education and understanding Salafism. The study of transnational Islamic movements such as Salafis is important because the development of transnational Islamic movements also affects social, cultural and religious stability in Indonesia, especially in West Kalimantan. ...
... Problems facing the Indonesian Muslim diaspora have motivated Indonesian Islamic organizations to introduce Indonesian Islam in Western countries even though intolerance cases have been raised and some scholars consider Indonesian Islam is not as promising as it was. The pessimistic views are triggered by the decreasing Indonesian democracy Fossati et al. 2020;Mietzner and Muhtadi 2019), indicated by the flourishing inequality Mietzner and Muhtadi 2020), the increasing of conservatism/populism (Bruinessen 2021;Jubba et al. 2021;Pribadi 2021;Zuhdi 2018), and Islamism (Azca et al. 2019;Arifianto 2020). However, some are still confident in the power of moderate Islam as the origin of Indonesian Islam (Subchi et al. 2022) and the fact of raising Islamism is not the mainstream of Indonesian Islam (Dzuhayatin 2020;Sakai and Fauzia 2014). ...
... This is so because organized opportunities are what allow any ideology to exist. The ideology of the caliphate is likely to resurface in another form as long as societal issues like poverty, injustice, social inequality, and political pressure continue, he added (Pribadi, 2021). ...
... This activity includes visiting several rural areas that have not been previously covered by government programs and assistance, such as the Program Keluarga Harapan (PKH), Cash Direct Assistance for Village Funding (BLT DD), and other types of assistance.(jatim.nu.or.id, 2020a) Based on field data, in collaboration with the East Java LAZISNU institution, no less than 1 million of the nine necessities had been distributed to the entitled and needed people. They did it for free without collecting a penny (www.nu.or.id, 2020) (Pribadi, 2020). ...
... Fifth, based on the distribution of keywords frequently used by writers, Islamic education is taught from a moderate rather than a violent perspective (Andriasanti, 2016;Irawan, 2017;Pribadi, 2019;Sofyan et al., 2015). This finding lends credence to the claim made by many scientists that the spread of Islam to the East (Southeast Asia) occurred without violence (Abdullah, 2017;Fauzi & Abdul Hamid, 2009;Hefner, 2008;Nathan & Hashim Kamali, 2005). ...
... Therefore, the imagined word media has penetrated the boundaries of identity, such as broad religion and even across Islamic ideologies, including Salafi, Tarbiyah, NU, Muhammadiyah and HTI. Pribadi (2019) called this the "democratization of religious knowledge". ...
... The involvement of Islamic religious groups in politics is viewed further. It shows the decentralization of apolitically autonomous ulama (Pribadi, 2018 (Pribadi, 2018). Islam continues to be a crucial ideological framework and social movement to mobilize. ...
... However, according 67 to Schulte-Nordholt, this characterisation only applies in the pre-colonial era. In this context, a permanent state of insecurity emerged, which facilitated the development of a hybrid form of private and public violence known as jago in Java or blater in Madura (Pribadi 2015) or jawara in Banten (Masaaki and Hamid 2008). As a result, the population had a relatively strong position in negotiating with certain elites with whom they might find protection from the jago, thereby confirming the autonomous degree of the criminals from the political elites during the pre-colonial period. ...
... Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) is an Islamic organization that in his view is a religious movement that aims to participate in building and developing people and communities who are devoted to Allah SWT, intelligent, skilled, noble, peaceful, just and prosperous (Pribadi, 2013). Nahdlatul Ulama realizes its ideals and ideals through a series of endeavors based on a religious ideological foundation that forms the distinctive personality of Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) (Farih, 2016). ...
... This is due to inevitable transformations taking place in today's rapidly changing society, thereby causing a shift from institutional to personal authority. However, this deauthorization does not exist in the case of charismatic leaders, such as kiai, because they have retained their traditional authority, despite being fewer in number (Machmudi, 2015;Pribadi, 2011;Utomo et al., 2020), and proven to be capable of transforming as well as revitalizing pesantren's religious knowledge systematically (Pabbajah & Pabbajah et al., 2020). These leaders are therefore needed to promote religious moderatism in modern society. ...