Yania Rodríguez's research while affiliated with Instituto de Biomedicina and other places

Publications (12)

Article
Full-text available
Lataste's viper (Vipera latastei) is a venomous European viper endemic to the Iberian Peninsula, recognised as medically important by the World Health Organization. To date, no comprehensive characterisation of this species' venom has been reported. Here, we analysed the venoms of juvenile and adult specimens of V. latastei from two environmentally...
Article
Full-text available
We have applied a combination of venomics, in vivo neutralization assays, and in vitro third-generation antivenomics analysis to assess the preclinical efficacy of the monospecific anti-Macrovipera lebetina turanica (anti-Mlt) antivenom manufactured by Uzbiopharm® (Uzbekistan) and the monospecific anti-Vipera berus berus antivenom from Microgen® (R...
Article
Full-text available
Bothrops lanceolatus inflicts severe envenomings in the Lesser Caribbean island of Martinique. Bothrofav®, a monospecific antivenom against B. lanceolatus venom, has proven highly effective at the preclinical and clinical levels. Here, we report a detailed third-generation antivenomics quantitative analysis of Bothrofav®. With the exception of poor...
Article
Snakebite envenoming represents a major issue in rural areas of tropical and subtropical regions across sub-Saharan Africa, South to Southeast Asia, Latin America and Oceania. Antivenoms constitute the only scientifically validated therapy for snakebite envenomings, provided they are safe, effective, affordable, accessible and administered appropri...
Article
Full-text available
Second generation antivenomics is a translational venomics approach designed to complement in vivo preclinical neutralization assays. It provides qualitative and quantitative information on the set of homologous and heterologous venom proteins presenting antivenom-recognized epitopes and those exhibiting impaired immunoreactivity. In a situation of...
Article
Significance: Bothriechis represents a monophyletic basal genus of eleven arboreal palm-pitvipers that range from southern Mexico to northern South America. Despite palm-pitvipers' putative status as diet generalists, previous proteomic analyses have revealed remarkable divergence between the venoms of Costa Rican species, B. lateralis, B. schlege...
Article
Snakebite envenoming has a heavy burden in the public health in sub-Saharan Africa. The viperid species Echis ocellatus (carpet viper or saw-scaled viper) is the medically most important snake in the savannahs of western sub-Saharan Africa. Several antivenoms are being distributed and used in this region for the treatment of envenomings by E. ocell...
Article
Full-text available
The venom proteome of the poorly studied desert coral snake Micrurus tschudii tschudii was unveiled using a venomic approach, which identified ≥38 proteins belonging to only four snake venom protein families. The three-finger toxins (3FTxs) constitute, both in number of isoforms (~30) and total abundance (93.6% of the venom proteome), the major pro...

Citations

... According to the manufacturer, it also has paraspecific neutralizing activity against the venoms of several oriental viper species, including M. lebetina [45]. As several antivenoms exist that are raised against the venoms of palaearctic vipers [44,46], in some cases even specifically against the venoms of M. lebetina subspecies (i.e., monospecific antivenom against M. l. turanica by UzbioPharm (Tashkent, Uzbekistan) [44,47]), it may be expected that the latter have better neutralizing capacities against M. l. lebetina venoms. Besides the monovalent antivenom from UzbioPharm, polyvalent antivenoms with stated (specific or paraspecific) neutralizing activity against M. lebetina venoms are produced by different manufacturers in addition to VACSERA, including the Institut Pasteur de Tunis (Tunis, Tunisia), the Institut Pasteur d' Algerie (Algiers, Algeria), the Imunološki Zavod (Institute of Immunol ...
... Clinical effects of envenomations are frequently untreated because effective and cheap antivenoms, even for the most notorious snakes, spiders, scorpions, and bees, are often lacking. This is one of the urgent humanitarian challenges, especially in countries where envenomations are frequent [17][18][19][20][21][22]. Moreover, many venomous neobiota that invade new ecosystems facilitated by climate change pose threats not only to humans by increasing envenomations but also to native species and livestock [23,24]. ...
... Chromatographic and mass spectrometry techniques have gradually been incorporated to complement current platforms recommended by the WHO for the evaluation of antivenoms and are ideal for establishing a geographical range of their clinical validity. Combined with in vivo neutralization assays, antivenomics represents a good complement to assess the therapeutic efficacy of an antivenom against the venoms used in its production, but also the paraspecificity of the antivenom towards other venoms of medical concern in the area of deployment of the antivenom (Calvete et al., 2018). ...
... The percentage of non-immunocaptured molecules is calculated using the formula %NRi = 100 − [(Ri/ (Ri + NRi)) × 100], where Ri is the chromatographic area of the peak "i" in the chromatogram of the retained fractions and NRi is the chromatographic area of peak "i" in the non-retained fraction. However, toxins that were poorly eluted in the retained fraction due to high binding affinity to the matrix were calculated using the formula % NRi = (NRi/ Vi × 100), where Vi is the chromatographic area of the same peak in the injected reference crude venom (Pla et al. 2017). ...
... Ontogenetic changes in the composition and activities of the venom have been observed in different species of snakes in many works in the field of proteomics and biochemistry (Andrade and Abe, 1999;Calvete, 2017;Gibbs et al., 2011;Gutiérrez et al., 1990Gutiérrez et al., , 1991Lomonte et al., 1983;Mackessy, 1988;Pla et al., 2017a;Rokyta et al., 2017;Zelanis et al., 2009). The venom of young snakes of other Bothrops species exhibited higher coagulant activity than that of adult individuals, while the latter generally have greater proteolytic activity (Andrade and Abe, 1999;Furtado et al., 1991;Guércio et al., 2006;Kamiguti, 1988;Pereira, 2006). ...
... Envenomation by New World coral snakes is characterized by local manifestations, including myonecrosis [7,8], cardiovascular effects [9], and predominantly systemic neurotoxicity leading to respiratory arrest and death in severe cases [10][11][12]. A number of micrurine species have their venoms analyzed by venomic and transcriptomic approaches, including those from M. surinamensis [13,14]; M. corallinus [14][15][16]; M. altirostris [16]; M. nigrocinctus [17]; M. mipartitus [18]; M. frontalis, M. ibiboboca, M. lemniscatus, and M. spixii, [14,[19][20][21]; M. tener tener [22]; M. laticollaris [23]; M. fulvius [24,25]; M. mosquitensis and M. alleni [26]; M. dumerilii [27]; M. tschudii [28]; M. clarki [29]; M. pyrrhocryptus [30]; M. ruatanus [31]; M. browni browni [32]; and more recently M. yatesi [33]. These studies have revealed that post-synaptic α-neurotoxins of the three-finger toxins (3FTx) family [34] and pre-synaptic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) molecules [35][36][37] represent the main toxin classes of Micrurus venoms. ...