Yana Yankova's research while affiliated with University of Zurich and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration is a promising tool for low-cost decentralized drinking water production. The biofilms in GDM systems are able of removing harmful chemical components, particularly toxic cyanobacterial metabolites such as microcystins (MCs). This is relevant for the application of GDM filtration because anthropogenic nutrie...
Article
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After strong fertilization in the 20th century, many deep lakes in Central Europe are again nutrient poor due to long-lasting restoration (re-oligotrophication). In line with reduced phosphorus and nitrogen loadings, total organismic productivity decreased and lakes have now historically low nutrient and biomass concentrations. This caused speculat...
Article
Full-text available
The most prominent responses of Lake Zurich to climate warming include the increase of surface water temperatures, a reduced depth of spring mixing, and the persistent thriving of the harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens, a low-light adapted species concentrating in the metalimnion during summer. To study changes of its habitat, we assesse...

Citations

... Previous studies indicated that during algal bloom period, the gravity-driven membrane (GDM) system was able to remove toxic cyanobacterial metabolites (microcystins). However, a much lower flux was obtained due to the algae attachment on the surface that reduced the membrane flux (Kohler et al. 2014;Silva et al. 2018). ...
... The blooms of P. agardhii are globally distributed and have been recognised as a direct consequence of the eutrophication often caused by discharge of agricultural or urban wastewater [45][46][47]. In contrast, the development of P. rubescens in metalimnion of deep clearwater lakes is partially attributed to climate warming, stability of water column and reduced of water mixing [48][49][50]. With reference to all these characteristics, both species are similar, yet different in many ways. ...
... In contrast, constantly elevated biomass of P. rubescens is attributed to changes in the patterns of stratification and mixing due to climate change. During the last decades, years with incomplete mixing have become more frequent, for example, in Lake Zürich, allowing P. rubescens to increase its population as more cells survive as inoculum for the next season's population while holomixis would diminish cell density more strongly due to higher hydrostatic pressure in deep water layers [39,144]. On the other hand, reduced mixing can also result in nutrient depletion of the epilimnion through sedimentation and thus lead to lower abundance of P. rubescens, as observed in Lake Garda [40]. ...