Yan Zhang's research while affiliated with University of Ottawa and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Full-text available
The use of biomaterials and tracking the long-term fate of the transplanted cells is expected to help improve the clinical translation of cell therapies for cardiac regeneration. To this end, reporter gene strategies are promising for monitoring the fate of cells transplanted with or without a delivery biomaterial; however, their application with p...
Article
Full-text available
Cell therapy is expected to restore perfusion and improve function in the ischemic/infarcted myocardium; however, the biological mechanisms and local effects of transplanted cells remain unclear. To assess cell fate in vivo, hexadecyl-4-[¹⁸F]fluorobenzoate (¹⁸F-HFB) cell labeling was evaluated for tracking human circulating progenitor cells (CPCs)...
Article
Biomaterials that have the ability to augment angiogenesis are highly sought-after for applications in regenerative medicine, particularly for revascularization of ischemic and infarcted tissue. We evaluated the culture of human circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) on collagen type I-based matrices, and compared this to traditional selective-adhesion...
Article
In cardiac cell therapy almost every cell type tested experimentally has yielded some benefit. However, there is a lack of studies directly comparing the function of various stem/progenitor cell populations. This study describes the expansion of peripheral blood CD133(+) cells and compares their functional properties with those of other commonly us...
Article
Clinical efficacy of cardiac cell therapy may be compromised by its target population, patients with endothelial dysfunction. In vivo inhibition by endothelial dysfunction has been demonstrated for protein angiogenesis but remains unclear for cell therapy. We examined whether hypercholesterolemia inhibits vasculogenic effects of transplanted human...
Article
Collagen delivery matrices have been reported to improve the results of cell therapy, but knowledge of their mechanisms of action is limited. To evaluate whether a collagen matrix improves early engraftment posttransplantation, 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG) was used to label transplanted circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) and track...
Article
Background: To investigate the mechanisms involved in the potentiation of cell therapy by delivery matrices, we evaluated the retention and engraftment of transplanted human circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) injected in a collagen matrix by using in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, ex vivo biodistribution, and immunohistochemistry...
Article
The introduction of stem cells and/or progenitor cells into damaged myocardium has promising therapeutic potential in ischemic heart diseases and dilated cardiomyopathy. However, understanding the biologic mechanisms and the outcomes of transplanted cells during cardiac regenerative therapy remains mostly limited to histological assessment. Positro...

Citations

... The featured reviews present recent progress in assembling cells and matrix into functional tissues by 3D printing [12] , and microfabrication for the purposes of personalization, disease modelling and drug discovery [6,13]. Once the cells are injected or placed with a biomaterial matrix at the desired site in the heart, their fate needs to be tracked in vivo and this special section brings an original paper on in vivo tracking of angiogenic cells transplanted into rodent hearts [14]. Finally, the progress of in vivo pre-clinical studies with engineered cardiac tissues on biomaterial matrices are reviewed [15]. ...
... 162 Alternative tracers for cell surface labeling include hexadecyl-4-[ 18 163 and FDG. 164,166 [ 124 I]HIB could also image adipose-derived stem cells in the heart for 3−9 days, 166 whereas FDG was rapidly taken up by neighboring tissue. The mechanisms behind the difference in retention between the cell surface labeling agents [ 18 F]HFB/[ 124 I]HIB and [ 18 F]SFB were not explored, but it is possible than protein-rich areas of the membrane (to which [ 18 F]SFB is more likely to bind) are more frequently recycled or that surface protein-bound radiolabels are cleaved by extracellular proteases. ...
... Although injecting collagen post-MI may seem counterintuitive given the presence of the collagenous scar, the composition and mechanical properties of the scar are vastly different from the normal myocardium 10,15 . Supporting their use as a therapy post-MI, (animal-derived) collagen materials have been shown to improve angiogenesis and tissue integration, reduce inflammation and apoptosis, and limit negative remodeling and the loss of cardiac function 24,[26][27][28][29][30][31][47][48][49][50] . Furthermore, the safety and efficacy of a porcine myocardial ECM hydrogel, composed primarily of collagens, was demonstrated in a pre-clinical pig MI model 20 . ...
... Taken together, sometimes CD133 phenotypic marker is useful. For example, it could be advantageous for inducing vascular-creation in the ischemic heart cells through transplantation (Zhang et al., 2010). ...
... Increased circulating VCAM-1 levels are observed in inflammatory conditions as well as with endothelial dysfunction [50,51,57]. Furthermore, an index of inflammatory condition [58] expressed as a ratio of the sum of pro-inflammatory biomarkers to IL-10 an anti-inflammatory biomarker ((MIP-1β + IFN-γ + TNF-α + MCP-1 + IL-2 + IL-6 + IL-8)/(IL-10), using the mean values from Table 1) revealed that this index was larger for the SGA group (5.5) compared to the AGA group (4.1), supporting the notion of a proinflammatory status in the mothers of the SGA infants. These findings are in line with previous reports [28,32,56]. ...
... Approximately half of the locally administered products were cell suspensions, whereas approximately one-third was cell/tissue products such as cell sheets (Fig. 2(a)). Clinical BD studies were performed for nearly half of the cell suspension products but only for less than 20% of [105] 88% Islets cells [105] 4 e97% Unselected BMCs, enriched CD34þ cells [105] >99% Non-mobilized peripheral blood CD34þ cells [105] 6% PHSC [105] 4 6 e95% Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells [106] N A Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells [107] N A Adipose-derived stem cells [108] N A T lymphocytes [109] N A T-lymphoblasts [110] N A circulating progenitor cells [111,112] N A WBC [113] N A direct 89 Zr-oxine non-clinical (house-made) No Dendritic cell: DCs [114] 4 0 e50% cytotoxic T cells: CTLs [114] 1 0 e20% Natural killer: NK [114] 3 0 e40% Bone Marrow [114] 1 0 e20% murine myeloma cells [115] N A direct 64 [123,124] N A cytolytic T cells: CTLs [125] N A cell/tissue products ( Fig. 2(b) and (c)). It was speculated that BD studies were performed more frequently for cell suspensions than for cell/tissue products because cell suspensions have a higher risk of migration outside of the administration site. ...
... Since PET can be used clinically for both cell trafficking and therapeutic response monitoring, it has been referred to as one of the best-suited modalities for evaluating the therapeutic effect of stem cells (6,7). Thus, we hypothesized that 18 F-FDG PET might be useful for the in vivo evaluation of spatiotemporal dynamic metabolic changes after transplantation of iPSCs or iPSC-CMs. ...