Xinjun Yang's research while affiliated with Northwest University and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Full-text available
Regional climate is complicated and unpredictable in the context of global climate change. Farmers on the Loess Plateau, who rely on agriculture and natural resources for subsistence, are one of the groups feeling the early effects of climate change. Their vulnerability is determined by their degree of connection with the natural environment. Frequ...
Article
Theoretical and methodological approaches of social-ecological system's vulnerability provide a new perspective for the sustainable development of arid areas. However, the spatial distribution heterogeneity of internal elements of vulnerability has always been ignored in current academic research and policy practice. Especially in low-exposure but...
Article
Full-text available
Regional rural systems respond to global environmental change with multi-dimensional transformation. However, in the widespread traditional agricultural areas, rural transformation is often seen as invisible and sometimes remains hidden by official statistics of urbanization and industrialization at a regional level. The study implemented field sur...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the evolution of farmers’ livelihood strategies (FLS) is crucial for maintaining the sustainable development of farmers’ livelihoods, especially on the arid Loess Plateau, China. This study constructed a novel analytical framework for analyzing the evolution of FLS and the critical influencing factors. Changwu County, an apple cultiva...
Article
Adaption to global environmental change is a focus of sustainability research. Farmers face multiple environmental and social pressures due to global environmental change. Effective livelihood changes must be taken to decrease asset losses and to adapt to current or future environmental challenges. However, there are few studies that systematically...
Article
Research on rural household livelihood vulnerability to climate change and extreme weather events (e.g., drought, flood and typhoons) has received broad attention; however, relatively few attempts have been made to assess the effects of social, economic, or spatial variation on livelihood vulnerability. With China's rapid urban expansion, many farm...

Citations

... Land is one of the important factors of production [33]. The quality of the land will lead to the emergence of poverty by reducing the income from agricultural production [34]. In recent years, some scholars have found that the coupling relationship between rocky desertification and poverty has changed in the new era, and the ecological environment is no longer the main factor leading to poverty in Karst areas of China [28]. ...
... The earliest vulnerability studies began with a single exogenous disturbance (28). In the early stage, the vulnerability was used to study the disastercausing factors of natural disasters and describe the damage to objects or systems affected by external effects (28)(29)(30). Later, the method was extended to social and economic dimensions, forming the vulnerability system theory, which was mainly used to validate and explain social-environmental systems (31), poverty (32,33), emergent events (34) et al. ...
... With the acceleration of industrialization and urbanization, China has witnessed the migration of a large amount of surplus rural labor to the cities as well as the increasingly serious phenomenon of the "hollowing out" of the countryside after reform and opening up [1][2][3]. From 1978 to 2019, the number of people employed in agriculture in Jiangxi Province decreased from 9.687 million to 7.008 million. The decrease rate reached 27.7%, with an average annual decrease of 63,700 people [4]. ...
... Another field of literature focuses on the relationship between adaptive behaviour and farmers' perception of risks associated with agricultural activities (Azadi et al., 2019;Tran and Chen, 2021). In this perspective, some studies point out that farmers' perceptions of adverse climate events may be influenced by the specific features of the farm and its pedoclimatic context, as well as by socio-economics aspects (Mirzaei et al., 2022;Yin et al., 2020). Consequently, because farmers have different experiences with extreme weather events, the perception of the need for adaptation and the selection of optimal mitigation strategies may vary. ...
... Apart from the government's efforts to cope with climate change, farmers also adjust their production behaviours to ensure their income growth and livelihood when they perceive the adverse impacts of climate change (Zhai et al. 2018;Li et al. 2021). For instance, they can transfer climate risk by purchasing agriculture insurance or mitigating income risk by increasing off-farm activities Zhai et al. 2018;Chen et al. 2018). Moreover, farmers can diversify crops, alter farming dates, plant resistant varieties, increase chemical inputs, improve irrigation and adopt water-saving technology to ensure grain yields (Jin et al. 2016;Yang et al. 2016;Tang et al. 2018). ...
... One survey discovered that 22.5 % of land-lost farmers have not received any monetary compensation since 2001, let alone social insurance and living subsidies (Landesa, 2012). Due to the lack of investment planning for the compensation for most land-lost farmers, the vulnerability of their living conditions is also noteworthy (Huang et al., 2017). Farmland is a key factor of production and the most important asset of their livelihood and social security for rural Chinese households . ...