Xing Xu's research while affiliated with Sichuan International Studies University and other places

Publications (14)

Article
Full-text available
There is a scarcity of scholarship that sheds light on international doctoral students’ identity construction in quotidian encounters beyond the formal curriculum. In this autoethnographic study, based on my diary entries, via a socio-constructivist lens, I teased out my multidimensional identity construction by referring to situations, activities...
Article
Full-text available
Education for sustainable development in foreign language teaching and learning impacts students’ lives in their current or future endeavours. Despite a wide body of literature elucidating identity navigation of EFL teachers and international doctoral students, a relative scarcity of scholarship casts light on the in-between cohort, namely those wh...
Article
This study delves into emic perceptions of Chinese international doctoral students’ navigation of a disrupted study trajectory during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with students and the conceptual framework of bioecological systems theory and needs-response agency, the article reveals a nuanced picture...
Article
Despite widespread discourse subordinating the female PhD as a third gender in the Chinese media, little is known about how this cohort conceptualises themselves, especially in an international context. Based on a qualitative investigation into 10 Chinese female doctoral students in Australia, this study examines their enactment of agency in intern...
Chapter
Against the tidal wave of internationalization of higher educationHigher education is the change of learning environmentLearning environment/context once student sojourners begin their studies abroad. International doctoral students’ perceptions of their lived experiences of learning overseas have attracted wide attention. Yet a few studies have ad...
Article
This study addresses the issue of international education through a human development lens. Using a group of Chinese doctoral students in Australia as a case study, it adopts volunteer-employed photography (VEP) to tease out the negative and positive forces that influence students’ developmental trajectories during their doctoral education. Analyzi...
Chapter
As indicated in Chap. 3, this study develops its analysis around the planning, implementing, and reflecting phases of the Chinese doctoral students’ (CDS) study experience. Having shed light on the CDS’ motives, decision-making, and preparation in the planning phase in Chap. 4, this chapter is devoted to reporting findings from the implementing pha...
Chapter
Having respectively detailed in Chaps. 4, 5 and 6 the findings from the Chinese doctoral students’ (CDS) experiences of planning, implementing, and reflecting phases, it is the time to place these findings into a theoretic framework for further analysis and synthesis in order to have a systematic and enlarged picture of the cross-cultural adaptatio...
Chapter
With regard of the bioecological systems theory, Chap. 7 has introduced, explained and explored its crucial conceptions and constructions in a detailed way. It has been argued that a framework based on the theory for analysing and synthesising the findings from the data gathered in fieldwork seems applicable, feasible as well as flexible in order t...
Chapter
Having set the background for this study in Chap. 1, in addition to giving a full description of current literature within pertinent scholarship in Chap. 2, the main task of this chapter is to describe the methodology that has been employed in order to answer the research questions. The methodology design and research implementation are the key iss...
Chapter
Having delineated the planning phase and implementing phase in the prior chapters, this chapter is committed to the last phase, namely the reflecting phase. Specifically, it delves into how the Chinese doctoral students (CDS) reflect on their overseas doctoral experience from a self-growth perspective.
Chapter
The previous chapter presented and discussed the adopted study methodology. In this chapter and Chaps. 5 and 6, data collected from the fieldwork was presented and analysed. As this chapter centres around the first student experience phase, namely planning phase, it is committed to delineating key findings from interviews in relation to the questio...
Book
This book makes valuable theoretical, empirical, and methodological contributions to the study of overseas doctoral students’ cross-cultural adaptation. Focusing on Australia, one of the top three destinations for Chinese students, this book seeks to understand how Chinese doctoral students perceive their lived experience of adapting to the academi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper derives largely from my own experience during two international sojourns as a case study to tease out the salient elements of the dynamic processes involved in the exchange of my Chinese name Xing for an arbitrary English counterpart Helen, and then followed by reverting to Xing again. Contrary to previous studies that construe the issue...

Citations

... More recent studies have utilised a micro lens, giving particular voices to students, to articulate their perceptions of international doctoral journeys. These scholarly endeavours encompass a wide spectrum, such as cultural challenges shaping doctoral research approaches and supervisory relationships (Robinson-Pant, 2010;Weng, 2020); personal challenges of stress, isolation, financial constraints, ill health and transnational family commitments (Pappa et al., 2020); as well as enactment of agency (Phan et al., 2019;Xu, 2021). Focussing on different dimensions and stakeholders, previous studies help to inform our understanding of and approaches to international doctoral education. ...
... This study offers practical implications on how various elements might have affected early doctoral students' academic adaptation in a specific higher education institution context. Effective strategies and suggestions have been provided to enrich the field of doctoral educational sustainability practically [44][45][46]. ...
... The benefits of international education to international students have been well studied in previous literature. The list includes a new and exciting chance to mix with people of different nationalities (Brown & Holloway, 2008), personal and professional development (Xu et al., 2020), enhanced intercultural learning and competence (Gu et al., 2010), higher employability upon graduation (Tran et al., 2021), and developing intercultural, cosmopolitan or social capital (Tran & Pham, 2016). In doctoral education in particular, international PhD students accumulate transnational social capital through 'valued relations with significant others' (Jenkins, 2002, p. 85), for example, contacts and collaboration with experienced researchers in academia. ...
... The spread of English as a major working language in many academic institutes in Japan may help bring about changes to terms of address since both cultures use Chinese characters. Although previous studies have already shown that Chinese students prefer to adopt so-called English names when learning English in Chinese-speaking societies (Li 1997;Lee 2001;Tan 2001;Cheang 2008;McPherron 2009;Chien 2012;Henry 2012;Gilks 2014;Sercombe et al. 2014;Chen 2015;Huang and Ke 2016) and when studying abroad in English-speaking countries (Edwards 2006;Diao 2014;Schmitt 2019;Cotterill 2020;Xu 2020), little is known about their practice of adopting foreign names in non-English-speaking countries like Japan. ...