Wolfgang H Berger's research while affiliated with National University (California) and other places

Publications (815)

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Eugen Seibold (1918–2013), who recently passed away in Freiburg, aged 95 years, was an important pioneer in marine geology, with a focus on the origin of marine sedimentary rocks and with a broad interest in Earth system science. His career includes the study of Jurassic rocks in southern Germany (he was born in Stuttgart) and investigations in the...
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The response of the climate system to external forcing (that is, global warming) has become an item of prime interest, especially with respect to the rate of melting of land-based ice masses. The deep-sea record of ice-age climate change has been useful in assessing the sensitivity of the climate system to a different type of forcing; that is, to o...
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Full-text available
The response of the climate system to external forcing has become an item of prime interest in the context of global warming, especially with respect to the rate of melting land-based ice masses. The deep-sea record of ice-age climate change has been useful in assessing the sensitivity of the climate system to such forcing, notably to orbital forci...
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The analysis of several stacked and tuned records from the deep-sea floor yields two rather different sets of values for rates of sea-level rise. One of these reflects “regular” growth and decay and the other represents rapid decay of polar ice. Typical rise rates during rapid decay are near 1.2 m per century; with higher values seemingly following...
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The astronomer A.E. Douglass is generally recognized as the founding father of dendrochronology. He studied tree rings in the search for evidence that solar variation (as seen in sunspots) is reflected in climate variation. He was convinced that his quest was successful. Analysis of some of his early data using Fourier decomposition and comparison...
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Ocean history is largely read from deep-sea sediments, using microscopic fossils, notably foraminifers. Ice age fluctuations in the ocean's sediments provided for a new geologic understanding of climate change. The discovery of rapid decay of ice masses at the end of glacial periods was especially important, yielding rates of sea level rise reachin...
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There is much interest in ice-age studies in recent decades, in the context of global warming. The relevant findings are these: large regular changes in climate occurred within the last million years, especially in the northern North Atlantic. Extreme conditions were similar, suggesting strong negative feedback at the edges of the range of variatio...
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The enigma of why mountain glacier started to retreat in the 1850s in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere remains unresolved. The most important factor affecting climate change presumably was a change in the mode of operation of the sun one or two decades earlier (from irregular periodicity and low output to regular periods and greater brightness). B...
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An important discovery during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 175, when investigating the record of upwelling off Namibia, was the finding of a distinct Late Pliocene diatom maximum spanning the lower half of the Matuyama reversed polarity chron (MDM, Matuyama Diatom Maximum) and centered around 2.6-2.0 Ma. This maximum was observed at all sites off sou...
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Studies of oxygen isotopes in foraminifers from deepsea sediments yield information about rates of change of sea level, for hundreds of thousands of years with a resolution of roughly 1,000years. The statistics regarding fluctuations for the late Quaternary (the last 900,000years) suggest that a rise of 10m per 1,000years (1m per century) is not un...
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Several prominent lines in the spectrum of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) are here considered as resulting from solar-tidal modulation. Lines near 8.9, 7.7, and 5.8 years are proposed to be a result of energy capture from internal oscillations into periods resulting from interference of solar and tidal cycles near 11 years (solar) and at 18.6...
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The evolution of large marine mammals and their invasion of the pelagic realm is tied to the availability of sufficient food, which in turn is linked to upwelling areas and other highly productive regions in the ocean, as has been recognized for some time. Here I propose that silicate-supported upwelling (which provides the shorter food chain and h...
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The discovery of the ice ages began with the invention of the Great Ice Age by Louis Agassiz, in the first half of the nineteenth century. His ideas were shaped by the interpretation of skeletons and frozen remains of large mammals found in Siberia, at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The concept of the Great Ice Age stands in contrast to e...
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The world's largest positive temperature deviation from zonal mean temperatures lies within the realm of the Nordic Seas, comprising bodies of water variously referred to as the Norwegian Sea, the Iceland Sea, and the Greenland Sea. Its role as a mixing cauldron for waters entering from the North Atlantic and the Arctic Oceans, and its function as...