Willie Cook's research while affiliated with Cancer Society of New Zealand and other places

Publications (5)

Article
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Coordinated counts of waders across New Zealand have been undertaken in November and June since 1983; the consistent timing of counts aimed to reduce variation from the effect of seasonal changes in bird numbers. The Australian Shorebird census and the wider Asian Waterbird Census, however, are conducted in January, making direct comparison with th...
Article
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The foraging challenge for predators is to find and capture food with adequate levels of energy and nutrients. Marine predators require particularly sophisticated foraging strategies that enable them to balance self- and offspring-feeding, and also in many circumstances simultaneously consider the nutritional constraints of their partners. Here we...
Article
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Patchily distributed marine pelagic prey present considerable challenges to predatory seabirds, including Gannets (Morus spp.) departing from large breeding colonies. Here, for the first time, we used GPS data loggers to provide detailed spatial, temporal, and habitat metrics of chick-rearing Australasian Gannets (Morus serrator) foraging behaviour...
Article
Full-text available
The diet of the Australasian gannet (Morus serrator) at Farewell Spit, New Zealand, was studied by the analysis of 70 regurgitations collected from the 1995 to 2001 breeding seasons. Surface schooling pilchard (Sardinops neopilchardus) was the main prey, followed by anchovy (Engraulis australis). The composition of the diet was similar in most seas...

Citations

... Differences in energetic demands over the breeding season may also lead to variation in body condition (Moe et al., 2002) but all individuals in this study were sampled during the chick provisioning period. Sex-linked differences in scaled mass have been observed previously in Northern gannets and may reflect the differing physiological demands of reproduction, and breeding role specialization, as well as more subtle differences between the sexes in prey-capture techniques, nutritional requirements and fine-scale habitat and prey selection (Stauss et al., 2012;Cleasby et al., 2015;Machovsky-Capuska et al., 2016;Bodey et al., 2018b). The difference in scaled mass between individuals at Grassholm and Bass Rock may reflect variation in the prey resources and environmental conditions accessible to individuals from their respective colonies. ...
... The animals tend to adjust the macronutrient intake closer to their natural diet, especially by increasing protein consumption in the high-temperature treatment (Fig. 2.7). Such nutrientspecific diet selection is consistent with the ecology of marine organisms, which forage in nutritionally complex and fluctuating marine environments that vary spatially and temporally (Tait et al. 2014;Machovsky-Capuska et al. 2016a, 2018. ...
... The species is also found in the coastal waters of North and South Island in New Zealand excluding southeast coast of the South Island (Froese & Pauly, 2019). Individuals of this species form compact schools and are prey to larger fi shes, marine mammals and birds (Majluf & Reyes, 1989;Bunce, 2001;Schuckard et al., 2012). ...
... When possible, prey type (zooplankton or fish) was identified by direct observation or inferred from the presence of other predators in the same area as the whales and known to have a specific prey preference. For example, Australasian gannets (Morus serrator) dive to feed on schooling fish (Machovsky-Capuska et al., 2014), whereas New Zealand storm petrels (Fregetta maoriana) and fluttering shearwaters (Puffinus gavia) feed on surface zooplankton (Gaskin & Rayner, 2013). When possible, video footage of the feeding behavior of the whales was also recorded. ...