William L. Robinson's research while affiliated with University of Toronto and other places

Publications (2)

Article
Data on litter size of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) collected during the late spring and summer in southern Ontario disclosed that litters born in May and June were significantly larger than those born later in the summer. Winter reproduction of this species appears to be uncommon in this area.
Article
Winter observations of social behavior in 3 groups of 5 penned white-tailed deer fawns on sub-maintenance rations showed: A dominant position in the hierarchy seemed to be favorable from the standpoint of maintaining physical condition. Some deer, however, in socially low-ranking positions, but in good condition in autumn, survived the winter with...

Citations

... This effect is strengthened when populations show seasonal variations. In rodents, the general pattern is that mean litter size declines from summer to autumn, remains small if winter breeding occurs, then increases in spring (Kott and Robinson 1963;Keller and Krebs 1970;French et al. 1975;Anderson and Boonstra 1979;Krohne 1981;Myers and Master 1983;Taitt and Krebs 1985;Dobson and Myers 1989). ...
... Because capture myopathy was a contributing factor to translocated doe mortality in this study, we believe it is possible that is also led to pregnancy termination in some does, without being severe enough to result in death. Additionally, white-tailed deer have been found to adhere to social hierarchies that often benefit the fitness of socially dominant individuals (Robinson 1962;Taillon and Côté 2007;Donohue et al. 2013). In high-density populations, quality fawning cover may be more accessible to socially dominant females that exclude subdominant individuals from these areas (Ozoga et al. 1982). ...