Will Johncock's research while affiliated with The University of Sydney and other places

Publications (18)

Chapter
Collectively sanctioned protocols dictate how affectionate we are to the various kinds of people in our lives. Hierocles’ impression that we categorize people in concentric circles becomes relevant here. His response to such categorization is to request that we decrease the distance between ourselves and the people in our outer circles. Hierocles e...
Chapter
Scientific knowledge development involves a sequence between the preconceptions of premises and the confirmation or reconfiguration of those premises via the “discovery” of information. In a Stoic context, we similarly see Epictetus’ belief that preconceptions condition every object of investigation and consequent knowledge. I incorporate here a re...
Chapter
The parameter of gender is useful in asking whether access to education and the work outcomes that derive from education are egalitarian. This discussion integrates Musonius’ belief that women deserve the same educational opportunities as men. Musonius qualifies this position with the condition that educated women must not abandon their domestic la...
Chapter
We can situate the question of when you are “present” through the difference between (1) the Aristotelian present “now” and (2) the Chrysippean argument that no aspect of time is ever exclusively present. Chrysippus’ position has ramifications for the socially normalized notion of “being present” which seems to require an exclusive or primary atten...
Chapter
Recognizes dual Stoic positions concerning our social existence. One position emphasizes the importance of a cohesive social fabric. In the second position the Stoics order us to be indifferent to socialized phenomena that they define as external to the essential self. These positions frame my overview of a comparative study between Stoic philosoph...
Chapter
The conventional interpretation is that mental decision-making processes primarily participate in causing our bodily behaviors and actions. Zeno’s position simplifies this kind of interpretation by arguing that only things that are bodied exist. This means that only bodies act and are acted upon. I note similarities of Zeno’s position with Bourdieu...
Chapter
The relation of reason/rationality to passion/emotion emerges in Posidonius’ Platonic-inspired polarization of our rational and passionate faculties. I compare Posidonius’ position to Chrysippus’ converse impression that reason and passion derive from the same internal faculty. In noting that for Posidonius the faculty responsible for our passion/e...
Chapter
The management of our feelings seems to have individual orientations. We personally benefit from being in control of ourselves. This chapter considers which other stakeholders more broadly benefit from an individual’s self-control. The appeal of being able to manage our emotions manifests Epictetus’ call to be indifferent to externals. Just as for...
Chapter
Two conceptions of nature drive this chapter. One is the Stoic conception of nature as pantheistic rationality. The other is the conventional conception of nature as an ecological environment. The discussion considers whether climate change discourses oppose humans from the world’s natural (ecological) environment by conceiving of a human invasion...
Chapter
This chapter recognizes two conceptions of happiness. One is the ancient conception of a rational and virtuous existence. The other is the conventional understanding of feeling good/pleasure. I begin by noting that when we identify what makes us conventionally happy we often try to recreate the feeling. The converse assertion from Chrysippus is tha...
Chapter
The primary question concerns the extent to which we each have control over our thoughts. Epictetus argues that our internal rationalized mentality should be resilient to external influences. Our social environment is for Epictetus a primary example of this external stimulus. In asking whether an insulation of our mind from an external environment...
Chapter
The premise under investigation is that our decisions and actions seem to naturally consider our own welfare. This prefaces the integration of the early Stoic belief that self-preservation, not pleasure, is our primary or preferred mode of being. In correlating self-preservation with the happiness of living in accordance with nature, the Stoics con...
Chapter
This discussion asks at which point in our lives we become social. The foundation for this study is Marcus’ conception that a common substance between humans and the rest of the universe indicates one living organism. Because this organism’s substance is pantheistic, it rationally orders the world. Marcus describes the universe as a single communit...
Chapter
The central question concerns our knowledge of what impels us to travel. Seneca’s Stoic-inspired interpretation is that travel alters our location but not our internal state. For Seneca we travel for reasons of which we are unaware, often unwittingly trying to escape our fears and issues or just following what other people do. His consequent recomm...
Book
This book puts recently re-popularized ancient Stoic philosophy in discussion with modern social theory and sociology to consider the relationship between an individual and their environment. Thirteen comparative pairings including Epictetus and Émile Durkheim, Zeno and Pierre Bourdieu, and Marcus Aurelius and George Herbert Mead explore how to pos...
Article
Full-text available
Despite devoting their time to another person's needs, many carers paradoxically experience guilt during their caregiving tenure concerning whether they are providing enough care. When discussing the "enough" of anything, what is at stake is that thing's quantification. Given that there are seemingly no quantifiable units of care by which to measur...
Article
The notion that body modification occurs when one undertakes practices like tattooing, piercing or scarification, engenders discourses in which: (i) body modifiers endorse such practices as self-constructive, distancing their practitioners from social regulation and a deterministic biology, whereas; (ii) critics condemn their seemingly violent, cor...
Article
Full-text available
What is the relation of the human to the world and the things in it? Do the various forms of human interrogation of the world discover things, and with them, a world? That is, can we reduce Being to a separation of knower from what can be known, or of observer from what can be observed? This article interrogates the question of the human-world rela...

Citations

... No matter how difficult it is, any bitterness of life should not consume human beings wholly. People should strengthen their purposes by collecting more approaches as tools to face any bad thing that could come again anytime (Táíwò, 2020;Johncock, 2020;Manampiring, 2019). ...
... Pattee links this problem, which I call the general problem of 8 Adamson (2005) draws on Merleau-Ponty to emphasize how embodiment is crucial to measurement as coupling us, via instruments, to measured objects. Johncock (2011) links Merleau-Ponty's challenges to subject/object, inside/outside divisions, to the measurement problem in quantum mechanics, drawing his points about quantum mechanics from Barad (2007). My effort is to advance ontological themes in Merleau-Ponty, via measurement as an opening to issues crucial to radical reflection. ...
... Tattoos evoke a range of contradictory meanings, calling forth images of Nazi Germany and the Holocaust, tribal cultures, the punk music scene, and gang culture. They may be associated with freedom and liberation, domination and terrorization, resistance, transgression, and belonging (Johncock, 2012;Langman, 2008;MacCormack, 2006). ...