Warren Harrison's scientific contributions

Publications (6)

Article
This study examined the stability of risky driving behaviour from late adolescence to early adulthood among 823 young Australian drivers participating in an ongoing longitudinal study. This issue was explored by examining the stability of risky driving between the ages of 19-20 and 23-24 years (1) across the cohort and (2) among individuals. Focusi...
Article
This study examined the co-occurrence of risky driving with a range of externalising and internalising problems among 1055 young Australian drivers participating in an ongoing, 23-year longitudinal study. This issue was examined by: (1) investigating the co-occurrence of risky driving and other problem outcomes at 19-20 years; (2) exploring the rat...
Article
Young drivers are significantly over-represented among those injured or killed in road traffic accidents. Young adults' greater tendency to engage in risky driving behaviours has been implicated in their high crash involvement rate. While considerable research has examined the driving patterns of young adults and situational factors associated with...
Article
Full-text available
A set of items concerning road safety and driving behaviour was included in the most recent, thirteenth survey wave of the Australian Temperament Project, a large, longitudinal community study of children's development and wellbeing from infancy to adulthood. Commencing in 1983, information has been collected from parents, teachers and the young pe...

Citations

... While the period of adolescence marks the transition from childhood to adulthood (Copeland et al., 2013), it is often characterized by risk-taking (Greenwald et al., 2021), learning intimacy skills (Lawford et al., 2020), and establishing a sense of identity and autonomy (Steinberg, 2008). This period is also associated with high rates of risky behaviors such as drink driving (O'Malley and Johnston, 2013;Vassallo et al., 2014), weapon carrying (Pham et al., 2017), substance use (Pokhrel et al., 2018;Waller et al., 2006), risky sexual behaviors (Nicholson et al., 2020;Yoon et al., 2018), as well as engaging in self-injurious behaviors (Ghinea et al., 2019). In adolescent samples, strong associations have been observed among these risky behaviors (Jessor et al., 2003). ...
... Les recherches de Harris et Harrison[128] ont démontré que parmi les jeunes conducteurs, les hommes possèdent un comportement de conduite bien plus risqué que celui des femmes, avec des taux plus élevés de vitesse et de conduite en état d'ivresse. Cette différence de comportement est expliquée sur[128] par la différence de stéréotypes sexuels entre la féminité et la masculinité, cette dernière est généralement associée à la prise de risque.Dans ce même principe, Mahalik et al.[87] affirment qu'un niveau élevé de masculinité est associé à un niveau élevé de prise de risque, d'agressivité ainsi qu'un niveau élevé d'accidents. ...
... Extant research on how risk-taking is related to driving behaviour suggests that risk-taking is at its highest with young drivers, and decreases as drivers become older (Jessor, Turbin, & Costa, 1997;Vassallo et al., 2013). This coincides with patterns in road fatality rates, with the likelihood of fatal car accidents reducing as driver age increases (Bureau of Infrastructure, 2013). ...
... Nearly twenty million young people become drivers every year in China. Teenage drivers are overrepresented in crashes when compared with middle-aged drivers (Ryan et al., 1998;Neyens and Boyle, 2007;Vassallo et al., 2007;Braitman et al., 2008;Scott-Parket et al., 2009;McCartt and Teoh, 2015). With the high rate of crashes, novice teen drivers were considered risky in the road traffic and had been a focus of research worldwide (Lam, 2002;Williams, 2003;Ferguson et al., 2007;Shope and Bingham, 2008;Donmez and Boyle, 2010). ...
... As a group, individuals who chose to use cannabis are identified as more prone to engage in reckless on-road behaviors. For example, drivers who self-report cannabis use have increased odds of engaging in aggressive driving behavior, including shouting, cursing, making a rude gesture, or threatening to hurt another road user or vehicle , and are more likely to engage in risky driving such as speeding, street racing, driving too closely to other vehicles, driving without a seat belt, and driving after drinking (Elliott et al., 2006;Fergusson et al., 2003;Smart et al., 2011;Vassallo et al., 2008). Cannabis use during adolescence is also associated with serious traffic offenses and collisions in early adulthood (Reeder et al., 1998;Shope et al., 2001). ...