W D McArdle's research while affiliated with City University of New York - Queens College and other places

Publications (65)

Book
This edition of McArdle, Katch, and Katch's respected text reflects the most recent, evidence-based information on how nutrition affects exercise and sports performance. Using high quality research to illustrate teaching points, the authors provide detailed yet accessible coverage of the science of exercise nutrition and bioenergetics, along with v...
Book
Introducing the Fifth Edition of the more focused version of the best-selling Exercise Physiology text. Ideal for an introductory course, this title emphasizes nutrition as the foundation of exercise and uses a new student-friendly magazine-style design, hallmark pedagogy, and an engaging, accessible writing style to make exercise physiology intere...
Book
Updated with the latest cutting-edge research findings, the Fourth Edition helps readers make the bridge between nutrition and exercise concepts and their practical applications. The book provides a strong foundation in the science of exercise nutrition and bioenergetics and offers valuable insights into how the principles work in the real world of...
Book
Essentials of Exercise Physiology offers a compact version of the Seventh Edition of the bestselling Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance, making it ideal for introductory undergraduate courses. As you progress through the text, you'll develop a deep understanding of the interrelationships among energy intake, energy transf...
Article
The purpose of the present study was to determine the validity of Cooper's 12-min. endurance run test in 36 college women using max VO2 as the criterion of validity. Max VO2 was measured using the Balke treadmill test (mean = 2.29 L/min; 38.9 ml/kg/min). Percent body fat (mean = 21.8%) and lean body weight (mean = 45.0 kg.) were also determined in...
Book
Updated with the latest cutting-edge research findings, the Fourth Edition helps readers make the bridge between nutrition and exercise concepts and their practical applications. The book provides a strong foundation in the science of exercise nutrition and bioenergetics and offers valuable insights into how the principles work in the real world of...
Book
Since publication of its First Edition in 1981, Exercise Physiology has helped more than 350,000 students build a solid foundation of the scientific principles underlying modern exercise physiology. This Seventh Edition has been thoroughly updated with all the most recent findings, guiding you to the latest understanding of nutrition, energy transf...
Article
Full-text available
To examine the effect of cold-water immersion at different depths on thermal and metabolic responses, eight men (25 yr old, 16% body fat) attempted 12 tests: immersed to the knee (K), hip (H), and shoulder (Sh) in 15 and 25 degrees C water during both rest (R) or leg cycling [35% peak oxygen uptake; (E)] for up to 135 min. At 15 degrees C, rectal (...
Article
The influence of exercise intensity on thermoregulation was studied in 8 men and 8 women volunteers during three levels of arm-leg exercise (level I: 700 ml oxygen (O2).min-1; level II: 1250 ml O2.min-1; level III: 1700 ml O2.min-1) for 1 h in water at 20 and 28 degrees C (Tw). For the men in Tw 28 degrees C the rectal temperature (Tre) fell 0.79 d...
Article
The relationship between peak VO2 and serum lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins was assessed in nine traumatic spinal cord injured (SCI), active, male volunteers. Mean (SD) age, height, and weight were 30.6 (11.6) yr, 171.1 (11.3) cm, and 74.2 (12.5) kg, respectively. Peak VO2 (X = 2.13 l.min-1) was assessed by a graded arm-crank test to maxi...
Article
The present study examined the hemodynamic differences between upper- and lower-body exercise where the total power output (PO) was proportionally distributed between the upper and lower body. Six males completed five combinations of arm-leg exercise at maximal and three submaximal intensities. The ratio of arm PO to total PO for each exercise comb...
Article
The specificity of aerobic training for upper-body exercise requiring differing amounts of muscle mass was evaluated in 25 college-aged male recreational swimmers who were randomly assigned to either a non-training control group (N = 9), a 10-wk swim(S)-training group (N = 9), or a group that trained with a standard swim-bench pulley system (SB; N...
Article
Thermoregulatory responses were studied in 10 men and 8 women at rest in air and during 1-h immersion in water at 20, 24, and 28 degrees C. For men of high body fat (27.6%), rectal temperature (Tre) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were maintained at air values at all water temperatures (Tw). For men of average (16.8%) and low (9.2%) fat the change in...
Article
Thermoregulatory responses were studied in 10 men and 8 women during 36-W exercise for 1 h in air and water at 20, 24, and 28 degrees C. Men were classified as high (27.6%; n = 2), average (16.8%; n = 4), and low (9.2%; n = 4) percent body fat, whereas women were classified as average (25.2%; n = 4) and low (18.5%; n = 4) fat. For both men and wome...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study, the effects of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) repositioning by use of an acrylic appliance on maximum and submaximum physiologic and performance measures were evaluated in seven male and four female volunteers with documented TMJ malalignment. In an attempt to remove design inadequacies of previous research in this area, a doub...
Article
Full-text available
McARDLE, WILLIAM D., LEONARD B. GOLDSTEIN, FRED C. LAST, ROBERT SPINA, STEVEN LICHTMAN, JAMES E. MEYER, AND AL. I. BERGER. Temporomandibular joint repositioning and exercise performance: a double-blind study. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 228-233, 1984. In the present study, the effects of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) repositioning...
Article
The specificity of aerobic training for upper-body exercise requiring differing amounts of muscle mass was evaluated in 25 college-aged male recreational swimmers who were randomly assigned to either a non-training control group (N = 9), a 10-wk swim(S)-training group (N = 9), or a group that trained with a standard swim-bench pulley system (SB; N...
Article
Maximal and submaximal metabolic and cardiovascular measures and work capacity were studied in control (n = 7) and experimental (n = 9) subjects (S's) during arm work prior to and following 10 wk of interval arm training. These measures were oxygen uptake (VO2), minute ventilation (VE), heart rate (HR), respiratory exchange ratio (R), cardiac outpu...
Article
To further evaluate the specificity of aerobic training, maximum physiologic measures (VO2, VE, HR, and R) and submaximal exercise heart rate were determined in control (N = 8) and experimental (N = 11) subjects prior to and following 10-week interval run training. Experimental subjects significantly increased (P less than 0.01) treadmill VO2 max b...
Article
By use of successive increments of discontinuous work with an arm-leg cycle ergometer the VO2, Q, SV, and HR were studied in six male subjects at rest and during exercise in air and in water at 18, 25, and 33 degrees C. The Q values obtained by CO2 rebreathing were reproducible. VO2 was linearly related to work with the plots for air and 33 degrees...
Article
The present study was designed to evaluate the specificity-generality of the cardiorespiratory adaptation to swim training. Fifteen male, college age, recreational swimmers utilized interval swim training procedures 1 h/day, 3 days/wk for 10 wk. Maximum physiological measures (Vo2, Ve, HR, R, and work time) were determined prior to and following sw...
Article
The specificity of cardiorespiratory adaptation to training was evaluated following 8 wk of bicycle ergometer (BE) training (N = 20), treadmill (TM) training (N = 20), or no training (N = 20). Subjects exercised 20 min/day, 3 days/wk for 8 wk at 85% of maximal heart rate. Mean VO 2 max improved with training in the TM group by 6.8 and 6.9% in the T...
Article
The present study determined the relationshipbetween maximum leg force (MLF) and various measures of leg composition to maxVO2 measured on a treadmill (TM) and bicycle ergometer (BE). MLF was measured for N = 50 during pedaling at 60 rpm in the exact cycling pattern of a BE maxVO2test by coupling an isokinetic dynamometer directly with a Monark (Sw...
Article
The relationship between individual differences in a steady pace endurance running test and maximal oxygen intake (l/min; ml/kg/min, ml/kg LBW/min) was determined in 25 college men. In the running test subjects attempted to maintain an initial running speed of 10 mph (4.89 yd/sec) for 10 min as they were paced around a 440 yd track. Running perform...
Article
The maxtyo2 and associated physiologic measures were compared in 15 male college students by use of the following six discontinuous and continuous bicycle ergometer and treadmill tests: Discontinuous Bicycle (DB), Continuous Bicycle (CB), Discontinuous Treadmill (DT), Continuous Treadmill (CT), Mitchell, Sproule and Chapman (MSC), and Balke Treadmi...
Article
The max [latin capital V with dot above]O2 and associated physiologic measures were compared in 15 male college students by use of the following six discontinuous and continuous bicycle ergometer and treadmill tests: Discontinuous Bicycle (DB), Continuous Bicycle (CB), Discontinuous Treadmill (DT), Continuous Treadmill (CT), Mitchell, Sproule and C...
Article
The max [latin capital V with dot above]O2 and associated physiologic measures were compared in 15 male college students by use of the following six discontinuous and continuous bicycle ergometer and treadmill tests: Discontinuous Bicycle (DB), Continuous Bicycle (CB), Discontinuous Treadmill (DT), Continuous Treadmill (CT), Mitchell, Sproule and C...
Article
The interrelationships between maxVo2, PWC and Skubic-Hodgkins recovery heart rate test scores were determined in 41 college women (6 athletes, 35 untrained). Test-retest reliability of maxVo2, and of physical work capacity scores on a treadmill test was also determined. In addition, reliability and validity were obtained for a 3-min step test whic...
Article
In the present study the relative strenuousness of women's competitive basketball was evaluated in six members of the Queens College women's basketball team by use of the telemetered heart rate. Heart rates were obtained on each subject for at least one quarter during regularly scheduled games. Estimates of energy expenditure were obtained by apply...
Article
The metabolic, heart rate and ventilatory patterns and physical work capacity in bicycle and treadmill exercise were compared in 23 male college students. The average reduction in max Vo2 of .324 l/min (9.9%) observed during bicycle work was highly significant (P < 0.01). The standard error of the prediction for max Vo2 on the treadmill from observ...
Article
To determine the validity of the postexercise heart rate as a means of estimating the rate during work, heart rate was recorded at various intervals during recovery from light, moderate, and strenuous work. The error in estimating the exercise heart rate from readings taken during the 10 seconds immediately following strenuous work (180 beats/min.)...
Article
The relationship between organ weight and swimming capacity was determined in 42 male albino rats. Upon completion of a 4-week training program, the animals were forced to swim to exhaustion with 2 percent of the body weight attached. They were sacrificed and specific gravity and organ weights determined. The results warrant the following conclusio...

Citations

... The total Kcalories, carbohydrate, protein and/or fat intake partially explained the variance in response to the functional performance tests and lower extremity lean mass (Δ%) between participants. It is well known that inadequate total Kcalories and more specifically carbohydrate, impairs metabolism, reduces focus, increases discomfort, and accelerates fatigue during the exercise [29]. Thus, adequate Kcaloric intake may translate to better training performance and a greater training stimulus to the neuromuscular system, thereafter, leading to enhanced neuromuscular adaptations. ...
... This may be due to equal levels of strength and aerobic training of wrestlers and recreational bodybuilders (Yoon, 2012). Katch and McArdle (1975), took anthropometric measurements of 94 athletes to determine an available formula for the wrestlers at the high school level. These wrestlers were divided into three groups while calculating their body fat. ...
... Flexor withdrawal reflex occurs when nociceptive receptors are stimulated and initiate an often-monosynaptic reflex arc with the intent of self-preservation from noxious stimulus [31]. On the other hand, crossed extension refers to a polysynaptic reflex that induces contralateral muscle activation: as one leg withdraws from a nociceptive stimulus, the contralateral leg extends in order to maintain stability [31][32][33]. The Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) is a reflex response to electrical stimulation of a nerve and is similar to the patellar reflex, as it acts on the same pathway as a mechanically induced myostatic stretch reflex [34]. ...
... An explanation for this increase could be the fact that the seaweed-fed group ingested about 70 g more of diet and this might have implicated in higher levels of triglycerides and consequently of lipoprotein VLDL-C. This lipoprotein, however, has not been associated to atherogenicity processes as it occurs to LDL-C, which is the primary transporter of cholesterol in blood and it is the lipoprotein with greater association with the incidence of coronary heart diseases (Katch and McArdle, 1993;Mahan and Escott-Stump, 1996). Thus, the diet containing seaweed meal was able to keep TC levels down without causing any undesirable significant increase in LDL-C. ...
... The issue of the lBSe as a model for the functional evaluation of swimmers has been widely studied and the effect appears to activate a considerable proportion of the musculature involved in swimming. 22 The activation of similar musculature involved in actual swimming is also supported by studies that compare lSBe exercise with stroke parameters: the modulation of the stroke rate during actual swimming and lSBe produces the same effect on Vo 2peak. . 10 Therefore, some of the mechanical movement patterns involved in the swimming action can be replicated during lSBe exercise. ...
... Short breaks are taken, but still under the sun. It is likely that part of the work, engaging arms to a large extent, will be anaerobic, resulting in increased lactate formation (McArdle et al., 1991). Although the results showed some indications towards stronger effects in the coastal region, the differences were smaller than we had anticipated. ...
... The direct measurement of VȮ 2max requires an extensive laboratory, specialized equipment, and considerable physical effort and motivation. These considerations increase the importance of submaximal exercise test to predict VȮ 2max from performance during walking or running or from heart rate (HR) during or immediately post-exercise [4]. Extrapolable HR to predict VȮ 2max is simple and valid [5]. ...
... Four studies applied a combination of aerobic training and resistance training (Martins, Marialva, Afonso, Gameiro, & Costa, 2011;Regaieg et al., 2013;Reed et al., 2014;Sigal et al., 2014). The combination of these two types of training provides several benefits, such as improved metabolic capacity and cardiorespiratory fitness (McArdle, Katch, & Katch, 2001) but also quantitative changes in skeletal muscle and increased muscle strength (Kraus & Levine, 2007). ...
... In the field of sports medicine the great attention especially for highly skilled athletes is paid to the issues of qualitative and quantitative balance of dietary nutrients [19,20]. It is established that a prolonged violation of the athlete's nutrition balance can lead to the development of disturbances in the functioning of a number of basic physiological systems of the organism, which leads to the reduction os physical performance [5,10,11,[21][22][23]. In this regard, there is a need for more in-depth study and individualization of components of energy consump- tion and nutritional needs of athletes of different specializations, depending on the stage of training and competitive activities. ...