Vishwanath Prasad Agrawal's research while affiliated with Nepal Agricultural Research Council and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Full-text available
Plant proteomics has made tremendous contributions in understanding the complex processes of plant biology. Here, its current status in India and Nepal is discussed. Gel-based proteomics is predominantly utilized on crops and non-crops to analyze majorly abiotic (49 %) and biotic (18 %) stress, development (11 %) and post-translational modification...
Article
Given the essential role of proteomics in understanding the biology of plants, we are establishing a global plant proteomics organization to properly organize, preserve and disseminate collected information on plant proteomics. We call this organization 'International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO; http://www.inppo.com).' Ten initiatives of...
Article
Kinetin (KN) action in rice self-defense mechanism was studied using our established 2-week-old rice (Oryza sativa L. japonica-type cv. Nipponbare) seedling in vitro model system. It was strikingly observed that KN caused formation of brownish necrotic microlesions in leaves, suggesting it triggers a stress response in rice. Subsequent northern ana...
Article
A rice (Oryza sativa L.) homolog of mammalian Rac-GTPase, OsRac1, characterized only in transgenic rice, was proposed to involve in cell death/disease resistance. However, its role in wild-type rice remains uncharacterized and unclear. We examined expression of the OsRac1 mRNA in response to stress signalling components, jasmonic acid (JA), hydroge...
Article
We report on japonica-type (cv. Nipponbare) rice seedling characterization of a jasmonic acid-inducible mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) gene (identical to the previously isolated blast- and wound-inducible first functional MAPK gene, BWMK1 from indica-type rice, accession number AF177392), and hence termed OsBWMK1. As BWMK1 was shown to be...
Article
A novel rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Nipponbare) gene, OsPR4 (pathogenesis-related type 4), which exists as a single copy in the rice genome, was cloned from a differentially expressed cDNA library of the rice leaves infected with the blast pathogen, Magnaporthe grisea. OsPR4, a PR4 type member, showed significant similarity at the amino acid level w...
Article
The rice endosperm kinase (REK) gene belonging to the SNF (sucrosenonfermenting)1-like subfamily of the calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase group (whose physiological role(s) remain elusive) remains uncharacterized to date in photosynthetic tissues. Using an established in vitro rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) seedling model system,...
Article
In our search to identify gene(s) involved in the rice self-defense responses, we cloned a novel rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) gene, OsATX, a single copy gene, from the JA treated rice seedling leaves cDNA library. This gene encodes a 69 amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 7649.7 and a pI of 5.6. OsATX was responsive t...
Article
The octadecanoid pathway metabolite jasmonic acid (JA) plays a vital role in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) defense/stress response(s). However, genes involved in its biosynthesis remain unidentified. Here, we cloned a novel rice cDNA highly homologous to the llene xide ynthase (EC 4.2.1.92) AOS gene, the first committed step in JA biosynthe...
Article
With a specific focus on rice self-defense response(s), the effects of global signaling molecules, jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), and ethylene (using the ethylene generator, ethephon), and protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, cantharidin and endothall on expression of a rice phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione pero...
Article
A rice proteinase inhibitor (PIN), Oryza sativa proteinase inhibitor (OsPIN), cDNA clone, was identified from a differentially expressed cDNA library of the rice leaves (cv. Nipponbare) infected with the blast pathogen, Magnaporthe grisea. OsPIN, which showed considerable similarity at amino acid level to the available potato, Arabidopsis and turni...
Article
Recently the rice (Oryza sativa L.) OsPR1a and OsPR1b genes were primarily characterized against jasmonic acid, ethylene and protein phosphatase 2A inhibitors. The dicot PR1 are recognized as reliable marker genes in defence/stress responses, and we also propose OsPR1 as marker genes in rice, a model monocot crop genus. Therefore, to gain further i...
Article
A novel rice (Oryza sativa L.) gene, homologous to a sorghum pathogenesis-related class 10 protein gene, was cloned from a cDNA library prepared from 2-week-old jasmonic acid-treated rice seedling leaves, and named as JIOsPR10 (jasmonate inducible). JIOsPR10 encoded a 160-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 17,173.23 Da and a...
Article
The rice OsPR5 gene, initially identified in response to pathogen attack, remains completely uncharacterized against global signaling molecules involved in defense/stress. Here, we provide evidence that OsPR5 expression, which is weakly constitutive in rice seedling leaves, is responsive to cut, and is up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic...

Citations

... However , mRNA expression levels may not translate precisely into protein function and, therefore, mRNA profiling may not fully characterize the functional proteome. Proteomic research areas are currently mainly focused on abiotic stress and biotic stress in rice [23] , the lack of a validated , high-throughput, quantitative functional proteomics platform for rice hull remains a major barrier to the identification of the underlying molecular mechanisms associated with its development. The isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) method has been developed for the simultaneous quantitative comparison and analysis of protein expression profiles of multiple samples242526. ...
... The data are from one of three independent representative experiments. defense pathway (Agrawal et al., 2000;Rakwal et al., 2001;Shimono et al., 2007;Hao et al., 2012) before and after M. oryzae infection. We established that the transcript levels of all these genes are significantly higher in Ostga5-1 plants after inoculation compared with those in ZH11 (P 5 0.01; Figure 2D). ...
... A model where pathogen attack or wounding induce the synthesis of jasmonic acid in plants and consequently the expression of proteinase inhibitors was suggested (FARMER & RYAN 1992;KOIWA et al. 1997). There is quite some evidence that pathogen infection and jasmonic acid influence the levels of proteinase inhibitors in plants (AGRAWAL et al. 2002;GRUDEN et al. 1997;KREFT et al. 1997;SHIN et al. 2001). There is some (AVROVA et al. 1999;POMPE-NOVAK et al. 2002), but significantly less information available dealing with cysteine proteinases. ...
... Jasmonate exhibits some activities similar to the plant hormone Abscisic Acid (ABA), which plays a key role in regulating water use by plants [60]. Jwa et al. [61] reported that as a fungal elicitor, CHT enhanced the rice endosperm kinase (REK) mRNA expression, which responds to the critical signals mediating plant self-defense/stress response, namely Jasmonic Acid (JA), Salicylic Acid (SA) and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, in plants, a large spectrum of antimicrobial and regulatory activities was obtained by using CHTbased molecules [7]. Lee et al. [62] reported that CHT reduced the size of the stomatal aperture and inhibited light induced stomatal opening by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS), including super oxide and hydrogen peroxide, which inhibit stomatal opening and promote stomatal closing. ...
... The expression of the OsRac1 mRNA, homology of mammalian Rac-GTPase, in response to signalling components JA and H 2 O 2 were examined in wild-type rice seedling. The OsRac1 transcript, whose accumulation required certain de novo synthesized protein factor(s), increased in the leaves upon H 2 O 2 treatment, but not by JA (Agrawal 2003). In addition, the oxidative burst in incompatible pathogen-challenged Arabidopsis leaves was found to activate a secondary systemic burst in distal parts of the plants, leading to the establishment of systemic immunity via the expression of defence-related genes (Alvarez et al. 1998). ...
... For example, a single AOS gene has been described in Arabidopsis [13], two AOSs have been found in barley (Hordeum vulgare) [14] and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) [15,16], and three AOSs have been identified in potato (S. tuberosum) [17]. Despite conflicting reports on the number of AOS genes in rice (one [18], two [19], four [20], or five [21]), a series of detailed database searches followed by functionality tests has convincingly shown that there are only two AOS genes whose encoding proteins localize in the chloroplast [11]. ...
... Plant responses to insects and pathogens are complex and modulate the expression of a large number of genes, many of which are believed to have a direct role in plant defense (Xu et al., 1994;Agrawal et al., 2003;Banno et al., 2005;Franco et al., 2017). Pathogen recognition by plants activates the host defense response resulting in the accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) (Pieterse and van Loon, 1999). ...
... PR10 genes were also sensitive to abiotic stresses, such as cold-hardening Wisniewski et al. 2004), wounding , salinity (Moons et al. 1997), drought (Dubos and Plomion 2001), and UV irradiation (Rakwal et al. 1999). The previous studies suggested that the expression of PR10 gene was also regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) (Mcgee et al. 2001;Rakwal et al. 2001), salicylic acid (SA) (Mcgee et al. 2001), abscisic acid (ABA) (Borsics and Lados 2002), gibberellic acid (GA) , and kinetin (Rakwal et al. 2003). Notably, some PR10 genes could maintain their transcriptions at a relatively stable level across different developmental stages in different plant species (Huang et al. 1997;Walter et al. 1996;Wu et al. 2004). ...
... Pb-organic acids resist the toxicity of Pb 2+ [9]. The expression of MAPKs and GSH metabolism genes was upregulated under HM stress [40]. The MAPKs signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating crosstalk between plant signaling systems as a means of facilitating adaptation, and coordination of plant responses to various stressors [41]. ...
... PR proteins are a vital component of plant defense system, and their accumulation at the site of infection leads to HR (Edreva 2005), usually accompanied by the accumulation of H 2 O 2 (Williamson and Hussey 1996). OsPR1a and OsPR1b can be induced by exogenous plant hormones JA, SA, and ET, and play an important role in rice resistance (Agrawal et al. 2001;Nahar et al. 2011). These are in line with our results and coincide with previous H 2 O 2 accumulation assays, indicating that K 2 SO 4 might increase the resistance of rice to nematodes through HR. ...