Victoria Gibson's research while affiliated with The University of Queensland and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Full-text available
Background Our study aims to explore the experience of having a central venous access device (CVAD) from the perspective of the child and family and how movements within and outside of hospital environments influence this experience. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted across Children’s Health Queensland (Australia), including inpatient an...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To develop and validate a difficult intravenous access risk assessment and escalation pathway, to increase first time intravenous insertion success in paediatrics. Methods Mixed methods underpinned by literature and co-production principles. Iterative development of the instrument was informed through semi-structured interviews and stake...
Article
Background: Central venous access devices (CVADs) are integral to cancer care provision. Despite the high prevalence of CVAD complications in children with cancer, preventative strategies are understudied. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess study feasibility, occlusive events, thrombolytic use, adverse events, and direct costs of cat...
Article
Full-text available
Background Healthcare delivery is reliant on a functional central venous access device (CVAD), but the knowledge surrounding the burden of pediatric CVAD-associated harm is limited. Methods A prospective cohort study at a tertiary-referral pediatric hospital in Australia. Children <18 years undergoing insertion of a CVAD were screened from the ope...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The optimal intravenous device for antibiotic administration for children with respiratory disease is uncertain. We assessed the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing midline catheters with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: Prospective, 2-arm, feasibility RCT in an Australian tertiary, p...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are vital for the delivery of medical therapies, but up to 30% of PICCs are associated with complications such as deep vein thrombosis or infection. The integration of antimicrobial and hydrophobic catheter materials, and pressure-activated valves, into polyurethane PICCs are innovations...
Article
Aim Central venous access devices (CVADs) are vital medical devices to support the treatment of paediatric cancer; however, device occlusion is common, which disrupts treatment. This study aimed to improve the identification and management of CVAD occlusions in children with cancer, as well as to identify the demographic, clinical and device charac...
Article
Background Critically ill patients in an intensive care setting often require arterial catheters for blood pressure monitoring and arterial blood collection. Arterial catheter failure, which manifests in both mechanical and infective forms, remains common. Dressing and securement inadequacies may impact this failure; however, the best method for dr...
Article
Aim Evaluate the feasibility of an efficacy randomised control trial (RCT) of paediatric peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) securement to prevent failure without resultant skin damage. Methods A 3-arm, pilot RCT in an XX paediatric hospital. Random assignment of 330 children to receive (i) bordered polyurethane dressing (BPU) + non-sterile foa...
Article
Introduction: Central venous access devices (CVADs) are a vital medical device for intensive care (ICU) patients; however, complications and failure are common, yet potentially prevented through effective dressings and securement. Objectives/aims: The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comp...
Article
Central venous access devices (CVADs) are vital to enable treatment for children with cancer and other complex health conditions. However, complications effecting the CVAD wound are commonly reported. This study aimed to identify the incidence and prevalence of CVAD-associated skin complications current management, and characteristics associated wi...
Article
Purpose: To evaluate feasibility of an efficacy trial comparing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) dressing and securement techniques to prevent complications and failure. Materials and methods: This pilot, 3-armed, randomized controlled trial was undertaken at Royal Children's Hospital and Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Brisbane,...
Article
Full-text available
Background Central venous access device (CVAD) associated complications are a preventable source of patient harm, frequently resulting in morbidity and delays to vital treatment. Dressing and securement products are used to prevent infectious and mechanical complications, however current complication rates suggest customary practices are inadequate...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Paediatric central venous access devices (CVADs) are associated with a 25% incidence of failure. Securement and dressing are strategies used to reduce failure and complication; however, innovative technologies have not been evaluated for their effectiveness across device types. The primary aim of this research is to evaluate the feasib...

Citations

... In "Peripheral Central Venous Catheterization Technology and Management," the education method for patients with PICC catheterization is to hold the elastic ball 3-4 times a day, 15-20 minutes a day, and do clenched fist-loosening fist movements. This is the first domestic monograph on grip strength exercise after PICC catheterization [11,12]. ...
... Pediatric intestinal failure (IF) is characterized by the inability of the gastrointestinal tract to absorb adequate nutrition and fluid to maintain hydration and support growth resulting in the need for long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) delivered via a CVC [1]. Long-term CVC usage can result in various complications, including central-line associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), venous thrombosis, and catheter compromise [2,3]. Catheter compromise can include urinary tract infection, obstruction, urinary leakage, and genitourinary tract trauma [4]. ...
... Securing RACs with sutures is frequently associated with bleeding and ongoing need for repeated dressing changes, increased risk of infection, loss of access and needlestick injuries, and should be avoided whenever possible. 39,40 Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives, widely used for skin wounds closure, provides effective securement for RAC and, in addition, an antimicrobial and hemostatic effect at the insertion site. 5, 41 The combination of an engineered adhesive securement device (EASD), or sutureless, and transparent polyurethane dressing significantly prevents accidental catheter removal and dislodgement. ...
... A large, randomised trial involving 350 adult patients (Bahl et al, 2021) suggested that a transparent dressing combined with CG may improve survival of an SPC if the line is expected to be used for more than 48 hours. In a randomised study with 330 children, both integrated securement dressings and CG were more e ective than bordered transparent dressings in reducing catheter failure (Kleidon et al, 2020). Nonetheless, the greatest change in practice in the past 2 years has been the introduction of CG into neonatal intensive care units. ...
... Regarding CICCs, a randomised clinical trial involving 121 adult patients (Mitchell et al, 2020) con rmed that CG was not optimal for the purpose of securement only. However, as had been abandoned at the hospital since 2010, the ndings of this study were reassuring. ...
... The primary and secondary outcomes were incorporated into a secure, web-based data collection tool (Research Electronic Data Capture). The data collection tool was originally designed and trialed within the study site by Marsh et al 13 and in pediatrics by Ullman et al. 14 The data collection instruments were piloted for interrater reliability and feasibility prior to use. 15 Education and familiarization with the data collection tools were provided to clinical and research staff, to ensure consistency and clarify processes. ...
... Overall, CVAD failure prior to completion of therapy in this cohort is similar to previous international estimates, 2 however this early evaluation of new CVAD types (i.e., tunneled, non-cuffed CVADs) demonstrate challenges (n = 7; 43% failure; 11.1 per 1000 catheter days). This may be because these new devices are being implemented as a "rescue" device, when other, traditional CVAD routes are no longer available or additional lumens are necessary 31,34,35 All causes of CVAD failure result in treatment disruption-and this has been consistently demonstrated to be associated with reduced survival for children with cancer. [36][37][38] The financial costs of CVADs in healthcare have previously centered on CABSI 4,7,8 and, less-often, thrombosis. ...
... 24 To ensure consistency, a semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit participants' views, including questions such as "tell me about your experience with your CVAD". The interview guide was informed by previous research and evidence synthesis [25][26][27][28][29] and informal discussions with clinicians and consumers. Interview questions broadly focused on participants' personal experience with CVADs (Supplementary Material 1) and included open-ended questioning. ...
... 24 To ensure consistency, a semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit participants' views, including questions such as "tell me about your experience with your CVAD". The interview guide was informed by previous research and evidence synthesis [25][26][27][28][29] and informal discussions with clinicians and consumers. Interview questions broadly focused on participants' personal experience with CVADs (Supplementary Material 1) and included open-ended questioning. ...