Vicki G. Morwitz's research while affiliated with Columbia University and other places

Publications (11)

Article
This research examines how using a paper versus mobile calendar influences everyday planning and plan fulfillment behavior. Consumers are rapidly moving from paper to mobile calendars for convenience, but this research shows that doing so may lead individuals to be less successful in effectively developing and implementing their plans. In three stu...
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One of the most ubiquitous human judgments is that of probabilistic predictions. Past research has shown that probabilistic predictions are influenced by spatial distance: people judge spatially near events as more likely to occur than faraway ones. We show that outcome valence also matters, and document under what conditions the reverse effect occ...
Article
Intentions are one of the most widely used constructs in consumer research. We review over 50 years of research that has helped us understand what intentions are, their antecedents and consequences, and how best to measure and use them as a proxy for or predictor of behavior. We define intentions and differentiate them from other closely relatedly...
Article
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Consumer research often fails to have broad impact on members of the marketing discipline, on adjacent disciplines studying related phenomena, and on relevant stakeholders who stand to benefit from the knowledge created by rigorous research. The authors propose that impact is limited because consumer researchers have adhered to a set of implicit bo...
Article
Full-text available
Consumer research often fails to have broad impact on members of our own discipline, on adjacent disciplines studying related phenomena, and on relevant stakeholders who stand to benefit from the knowledge created by our rigorous research. We propose that impact is limited because consumer researchers have adhered to a set of implicit boundaries or...
Article
At each stage in customers’ journeys, they encounter different types of numeric information that they process using different judgment strategies. Relevant numbers might include budgets, price, product attributes, product counts, product ratings, numbers in brand names, health and nutrition information, financial information, time-related informati...
Preprint
Full-text available
Voice assistants often present choices where consumers listen to product options. But do consumers process information differently when listening compared to reading? Bridging theories on evaluability and memory, six experiments, including one conducted in consumers’ homes on Alexa voice speakers, demonstrate that consumers listening to speech util...

Citations

... Second, Ceylan et al. (2022) examine what would normally be considered a cognitive intervention (i.e., calorie posting on menus), but with a social twist (i.e., examining the effect of calorie posting when alone vs. with other people) that made the intervention more emotional in nature. Specifically, they find that calorie information leads to anticipated embarrassment for ordering a high-calorie meal when eating with others (vs. ...
... Intention measures (e.g., of purchase or other behaviours) are easily understood by industry practitioners and relatively inexpensive to acquire (Armstrong et al., 2000). If accurate, such measures allow practitioners to make predictions where behavioural data is unavailable or cannot be extrapolated to future behaviour (Morwitz & Munz, 2021). Consequently, intention measures are of great interest as they enable businesses to produce the right products at the right quantity (East et al., 2008). ...
... In service research, dynamicsas a topichas only been addressed tangentially; therefore, theories, models and concepts tend to be indicative of stable conditions (Macinnis et al., 2020). For example, theorizing about the characteristics of customer experience as a phenomenon differs largely from theorizing about how, when, why and with what consequences customer experiences change. ...
... However, CCT scholars can benefit from this Möbius strip, insofar as ordering theorizations help scholars to see familiar topics anew with novel distinctions or unexpected connections (Sandberg and Alvesson, 2020). As discussed above and distilled in Table 1, there may also be opportunities to bridge the theory-practice divide and engage with nonacademic audiences (MacInnis et al., 2019). In concluding, it is worth noting that the ordering theorization of the Möbius strip can also be applied to other transdisciplinary topic areas that matter to wide and varied audiences, such as sustainability or de-colonization (Arnould et al., 2019). ...
... We focused on how expression mode impacts observers through attitude emotionality, but it might also have other direct effects. Consumers may be more likely to follow spoken recommendations because it is more difficult to process auditory information, which leads people to rely on heuristics to make decisions (Munz and Morwitz 2020). Hearing someone speak can also make them appear more human (Schroeder and Epley, 2016;Schroeder et al. 2017) which might boost persuasion. ...
... First, owing to its focus on the customer as the central stakeholder, the CJ literature is largely limited to the buyer's dynamics in his/her journey (e.g., Li et al., 2020;Santana et al., 2020). However, service ecosystems contain not only customers but myriad stakeholders, defined as "any group or individual who can affect or is affected by the achievement of [an] organization's objectives" (Freeman, 1984, p. 46), including directors, managers, employees, suppliers, owners, strategic partners, collaborators, competitors, policymakers, community organizations, the media, etc. (Hillebrand et al., 2015). ...