Veronika Kisfalvi's research while affiliated with HEC Montréal - École des Hautes Études commerciales and other places

Publications (13)

Article
Full-text available
The increasing popularity of experiential learning in management education raises a number of new opportunities and challenges for instructors, particularly with regard to shifting instructor roles and attention to learning through one’s emotions. In this article, we draw on psychodynamics—in particular D. W. Winnicott’s notions of “transitional sp...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing interest in the positive organizational literature in the complex interplay between the positive and negative facets of organizations, individuals, and situations. The concept of courage provides fertile ground to study this interplay, since it is generally understood to be a positive quality that is manifested in challenging situa...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this article is to propose an approach using mixed methods appropriate for studying polysemic concepts. Design/methodology/approach – Anchored in cognitive approaches, the methods relied on a generally applicable conceptual framework, on cognitive mapping for an intellectualized conception, and on in‐depth interviews for a...
Article
Institutional entrepreneurship is important for creating and transforming institutions, yet little is known about the individuals who conceive, initiate, and champion institutional projects. Extant research emphasizes factors contributing to institutional entrepreneurs’ success at championing change rather than their conception and initiation of ch...
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The Courage of Leaders “Leaders must show courage!” This expression appears self-evident if we regard leadership as involving a double competency, with a predilection for dealing with both difficulty and risk. Despite the vagueness of these two competencies, they seem to be closely related. This article presents, on the one hand, the links between...
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This article argues that case studies conducted within an ethnographic framework always contain an element of subjectivity and emotionality given the dose relationships that researchers establish with participants in the field, and that while these elements can be a source of bias, they can also be transformed into valuable sources of insight as lo...
Article
Faced with confusing and sometimes contradictory research results linking team composition to performance, recent research on top management teams (TMTs) has begun to investigate hitherto unexplored variables that might influence the hypothesized relationships. Increasing attention is being paid to the nature and quality of TMT strategic decision-m...
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Although entrepreneurs seem to engage little in formal planning, strategy in entrepreneurial firms can exhibit identifiable patterns over time. The strategic orientations of such firms are particularly likely to reflect the priorities of their entrepreneurial CEOs. While researchers have looked at entrepreneurial traits in order to explain business...
Article
Disappointed by the lack of consistent and robust findings, scholars suspect that the problems may be related to our research methods and have frequently called for longitudinal, clinical, and psychometric studies of succesion. This article compares the findings from one such study with representative studies in the literature. Examining the operat...
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This paper advandes and tests an overarching theorical framework pertaining to incorporate knowledge transfers within multinational corporations. Knowledge outflows from a subsidiary would be positively associated with value of the subsidiary's knowledge stok, its motivational disposition to share knowledge, and the richness of transmission chanels...

Citations

... Hence, it follows that, relative to other executives, the dominant CEOs (identified as CEOs with very powerful TMTs (top management teams), tend to veer policies and restrict the information flow within the TMTs, thereby, negatively influencing strategic decision-making and, therefrom, the TMTs' firm running performance (Bauweraerts and Colot, 2018;Vandekerkhof et al., 2019). Indeed, dominant CEOs would most often be inclined to support the TMT decision-making process, requiring stuff to be promptly executed, and, as such, consider themselves as corporate heroes or saviors as (Kisfalvi et al., 2016). ...
... Indeed, previous work has argued that drawing on an insider's knowledge of the empirical setting is a strong asset for management studies, as it enhances the richness and empirical relevance of the data (Bartunek & Louis, 1996). Thanks to their immersed position, ethnographers can also be considered fullfledged actors in the field, who develop a deep knowledge of the empirical setting through observation and thanks to their lived experiences and affective introspection, i.e., their emotional response to the phenomena they study (Bishop, Eury, Gioia, Trevino, & Kreiner, 2019;Kisfalvi, 2006). Ethnographers' "embodied knowledge" (Jakimow & Yumasdaleni, 2016: 178) reflects field actors' emotionality, providing a better understanding of their experience and generating valuable data about social dynamics in organizations (Bate, 1997;Sanday, 1979). ...
... Despite that, curiously, the virtue of courage is underresearched in the management research area and the few results are still eclectic (Amos & Klimoski, 2014;Harbor & Kisfalvi, 2014). Accordingly, as highlighted by all the papers grouped in this theme, there is a lack of a clear, concise, and shared definition of courage, which led Harbour and Kisfalvi, (2012) to define courage as a "polysemic, context-sensitive and highly subjective concept" (p. 169). ...
... Such conflation also does not parse out the skills and preparation educators must have to be prepared to assist students' ability to learn from any experiential activity. For example, while articles advocating for experiential learning all point to the educator's essential role in helping students go through, reflect on, make sense of, and internalize lessons from experiential learning (AACSB, 2002;Kisfalvi & Oliver, 2015;Mackaway et al., 2011;Petriglieri et al., 2011), they rarely include discussion of the unique skills and preparation educators should be considering when choosing to introduce them to their students. A recent learning outcomes meta-analysis specifically pointed to the need to describe and consider educators' backgrounds and self-awareness into their own skills when facilitating experientially grounded courses (Burch et al., 2019). ...
... En outre, le manager en maintenant son point de vue (extrait 14, 16) fait preuve de courage (Harbour et Kisfalvi, 2008). Le mot « courage » est un dérivé du mot « coeur ». ...
... The fear evoked by danger, intimidation, pain or uncertainty can be countered by courage (Detert & Bruno, 2017;Goud, 2005;Serrat, 2017;Shelp, 1984;Tillich, 1952). Courage is a positive and ethical response to threats and to pursue risky or challenging opportunities (Harbour & Kisfalvi, 2014;Koerner, 2014). It is the readiness to take upon oneself negativity anticipated by fear, for the sake of a fuller positivity (Shelp, 1984;Tillich, 1952). ...
... This is also, arguably, an apt metaphor for what entrepreneurs do. Yet, despite a few exceptions (e.g., Cornelissen et al., 2012;Hjorth, 2013;Kisfalvi & Maguire, 2011), much of the organizational entrepreneurship literature treats entrepreneurs as disembodied minds, with little regard for the impact of the body (and related imaginative and unconscious processes) on their entrepreneurial experience. Polanyi's (1978) concept of tacit knowledge, which is built on the premise of mindbody holism (Miller, 2008), suggests some implications of Blake's holistic approach to imagination for our understanding of entrepreneurship. ...
... These results provide a unique contribution to the literature regarding the significant effect of job crafting on innovative behaviour and the significant mediating effect of leader support on this effect. It is also supported by the studies that inspired the creation of hypotheses (Cummings and O'Connell, 1978;Van de Ven, 1986;Schin and McClomb, 1998;Kisfalvi and Pitcher, 2003;Akkoç, Turunç & Çalışkan, 2011;Demerouti, Bakker & Gevers ;Van Wingerden, Derks & Bakker, 2017;Lin, Law & Zhou, 2017;Lee and Lee, 2018;Kerse and Babadağ, 2019;Yalap, Sobacı, Baygın, & Ünüvar, 2021). The results are also consistent with the prediction of Conservation of Resources and Job Demands-Resources Theory. ...
... Successful leadership has been linked to, for instance, increased work morale and well-being ; strengthened self-esteem (Mhatre and Riggio 2014); enhanced creativity (Sundgren and Styhre 2006); decisiveness and power of initiative (Parker and Wu 2014); and an accentuated sense of meaning related to a collective organizational vision (Alvesson and Spicer 2014). Translated to the organizational levels, it has furthermore been shown that leadership can explain a substantial degree of performance variances (Day and Lord 1988, see also Wang et al. 2011), as well as being a potent nostrum for organizational development and change (Bass and Avilio 1993;Nadler and Tushman 1994;Appelbaum et al. 1998;Yukl 2002;Kisfalvi 2002;Gilley et al. 2009). ...
... Informal integration was measured by means of four items from previous studies (Zahra and Nielsen 2002) as a reflective scale, thus indicating the degree of a latent informal integration. While functional integration has been measured unidimensional in the past, for example, in terms of extensive use of cross-disciplinary teams within the R&D function (Henderson and Clark 1990), formal integration mechanisms have been adopted from previous literature in terms of a formative, multi-dimensional scale (Gupta and Govindarajan 2000;Jansen et al. 2005). The formative scale of formal integration mechanisms was also measured by means of an additional item in order to achieve a more complete construct, which is particularly important for formative constructs (Edwards and Bagozzi 2000). ...