Vasil Yasenov's research while affiliated with Stanford University and other places

Publications (23)

Article
We examine the consequences of a significant return-migration episode, during which at least 400,000 Mexicans returned to Mexico between 1929 and 1934, on U.S. workers’ labor market outcomes. To identify a causal effect, we instrument the county-level drop in Mexican population with the size of the Mexican communities in 1910 and its interaction wi...
Article
Full-text available
We collect 1,030 previously estimated wage effects and 432 employment effects of immigration and document that the mean and median impact on the relative wage are negative and significantly different from the small positive mean and median impact on the average wage. The pattern is reversed for employment effects where the magnitudes are also small...
Article
Full-text available
Many countries have reduced refugee admissions in recent years, in part due to fears that refugees and asylum seekers increase crime rates and pose a national security risk. Existing research presents ambiguous expectations about the consequences of refugee resettlement on crime. We leverage a natural experiment in the United States, where an Execu...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present a method to conduct automated surveys over WhatsApp, a popular cross-platform messaging service. The method relies on a combination of the WhatsApp Business API as well as the Twilio and Google platforms to design the survey flow, send and receive survey messages automatically, and facilitate data processing. Respondents complete the sur...
Preprint
Immigration legal services providers (ISPs) are a principal source of support for low-income immigrants seeking immigration benefits. Yet there is scant quantitative evidence on the prevalence and geographic distribution of ISPs in the United States. To fill this gap, we construct a comprehensive, nationwide database of 2,138 geocoded ISP offices t...
Preprint
We examine the labor market consequences of an extensive campaign repatriating around 400,000 Mexicans in 1929-34. To identify a causal effect, we instrument county level repatriations with the existence of a railway line to Mexico interacted with the size of the Mexican communities in 1910. Using individual linked data we find that Mexican repatri...
Article
Importance Federal policy changes in 2002 and 2009 led some states to expand public health insurance coverage to non–US-born children and pregnant women who are lawful permanent residents during their first 5 years of residency in the United States. In other states, there were concerns that insurance expansion could attract immigrants to relocate t...
Article
Citizenship can accelerate immigrant integration and result in benefits for both local communities and the foreign-born themselves. Yet the majority of naturalization-eligible immigrants in the United States do not apply for citizenship, and we lack systematic evidence on policies specifically designed to encourage take-up. In this study, we analyz...
Article
Workers with irregular or on-call work schedules constitute up to 17% of the workforce in the US. We identify the causal impact of schedule regularity on productivity by leveraging data from a Vietnamese university where freshmen were randomly assigned into highly-varying course schedules. Some schedules had consistent start times across the week,...
Preprint
Citizenship can accelerate immigrant integration and result in benefits for both local communities and the foreign-born themselves. Yet, naturalization rates in the United States are lower than in other traditional immigration countries and we lack evidence on which policies are effective in raising them. In this study, we analyze the impact of a m...
Preprint
Many countries have reduced refugee admissions in recent years, in part due to fears that refugees and asylum seekers increase crime rates and pose a national security risk. We provide evidence on the effects of refugee resettlement on crime, leveraging a natural experiment in the United States, where an Executive Order by the president in January...
Article
We apply the synthetic control method to reexamine the labor market effects of the Mariel Boatlift, first studied by David Card (1990). This method improves on previous studies by choosing a control group of cities that best matches Miami's labor market trends pre-Boatlift and providing more reliable inference. Using a sample of non-Cuban high scho...
Article
Sleep studies suggest that girls go to sleep earlier, are more active in the morning, and cope with sleep deprivation better than boys. We provide the first causal evidence on how gender differences in sleep cycles can help explain the gender performance gap. We exploit over 240,000 assignment-level grades from a quasi-experiment where students' sc...
Article
School scheduling systems are frequently at the forefront of policy discussions around the world. This paper provides the first causal evidence of student performance during double-shift schooling systems. We exploit a six-year quasi-experiment from a country in Eastern Europe where students alternated between morning and afternoon school blocks ev...

Citations

... Moreover, a Facebook user granted page administrator role can monitor and participate in chatbot's conversations. As a result a human agent is able help users facings issues in conversations, to help them progress through the survey, or to help the chatbot in responding to any non-standard interactions, e.g. to avoid biased contents of databases[20].While Twilio platform has recently been used for custom chat applications using WhatsUp by Immigration Policy Lab at Stanford University[6], this is the first deployment of Twilio cloud platform with Facebook Messenger to migration studies, and second to support migrants in Europe.2 https://developers.facebook.com/docs/messenger-platform ...
... Early start times, however, may not be detrimental to learning if students are able to adapt to waking up early or if teachers are more productive with early schedules. Some positive effect on measurable academic outcomes, with mixed results (Carrell, Maghakian, & West, 2011;Edwards, 2012;Heissel & Norris, 2018;Hinrichs, 2011;Luong, Lusher, & Yasenov, 2017;Wong, 2011). ...
... As LAWA shrinks the low-skilled immigrant workforce in Arizona, there is less incentive for natives to specialize in occupations that require higher communication skill. Similarly, recent work by Lee et al. (2019) also found evidence of U.S. natives' occupational downgrading following Mexican repatriations in the 1930s. ...
... One example is a new commuting policy that led to a sharp and unexpected inflow of Czech workers to areas along the German-Czech border (Dustmann et al., 2017). 5 An increasing number of papers look at the impacts of refugees and IDPs on education (Semrad, 2015;Assaad et al., 2018;Tumen, 2018Tumen, , 2019aTumen, , 2019bBilgili et al., 2019;Figlio and Umut, 2018), fewer papers look at the impacts on health (Baez, 2011), the environment (Martin et al., 2017) or at the impacts on crime and social cohesion in the host communities (Amuedo-Dorantes et al., 2018; Depetris-Chauvin and Santos, 2018; Masterson and Yasenov, 2018). migration or the impacts of war and violence are broader in scope and have only occasional references to papers covering the impact of forced migrants on host communities. ...
... As discussed earlier, notable studies on the determinants of crime rates in the United States have overlooked the long-run relationship between refugee inflow and crime rate, which is perplexing. Although there is no model of crime to explain the relationship between refugee inflow and crime rates, according to Masterson and Yasenov (2021), refugee inflow may be associated with an increase in crime rates in the host country if (a) the refugees are a "crime-prone demographic", and (b) they face economic hardship and social alienation after arriving in the host country. This paper makes three unique contributions to advances in the crime literature. ...
... Among undocumented immigrants, an overwhelming number of studies suggest immigration enforcement actions undermine trust in public institutions, making individuals less likely to engage in everyday behaviors or seek health and social services (Hacker et al., 2015). However, immigration enforcement does not inhibit all health seeking behavior (Yasenov et al., 2020) and the extent to which immigration enforcement influences vaccine acceptance is unknown. ...
... This empirical practice echoes, rather than contradicts, the definition of administrative burden to focus on individual experience as distinct from-but related to-actual rules and process. Some of the potential convergence emerges from more recent behavioral approaches, which often employ experimental designs and an examination of behavioral responses, such as take-up (e.g., Braconnier et al., 2017;Yasenov et al., 2019). As the literature demonstrates, despite differences in emphasis regarding the locus of evaluation, the objectivity of frictions does not create a hard distinction between how the concepts are or could be utilized and measured in practice. ...
... A field study based on a natural experiment examining the impact of the variable timing of a different daily activity, students' class time, found no negative impact on their academic achievement(Lusher et al., 2019). ...
... Perceived threats related to economics (employment competition and public benefit usage), culture (social division and a loss of power among white communities), and security (terrorism, crime, and disease) (Hogan and Haltinner 2015). Although the data do not support these claims that refugees post a safety risk (Amuedo-Dorantes et al. 2018;Masterson and Yasenov 2019;Sakib and Ishraque Osman 2019), perceptions of refugees and immigrants constituting a threat (Hogan and Haltinner 2015) may foster discrimination, rejection, and fear. Refugee groups with minority racial status face additional challenges to inclusion in countries with entrenched histories of racial bias (Baak 2019). ...
... In addition, Cuban President Fidel Castro opened Cuban prisons and mental health facilities to transport prisoners to Mariel to emigrate from Cuba. This suggests that the unique demographic of immigrants in the Mariel Boatlift might be more costly for local governments due to a higher propensity for criminal activity and a lower skilled labor force than a typical immigration cohort (Billy & Packard, 2020;Peri & Yasenov, 2019). This paper contributes directly to literature devoted to the fiscal effects of immigration, specifically the disagreement surrounding local fiscal effects. ...