Vakhtang Licheli's research while affiliated with Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University and other places

Publications (2)

Article
Full-text available
Recent archaeomagnetic data from ancient Israel revealed the existence of a so-called “Levantine Iron Age geomagnetic anomaly” (LIAA) which spanned the first 350 years of the first millennium BCE and was characterized by a high averaged geomagnetic field (Virtual Axial Moment, VADM > 140 ZAm2, nearly twice of today's field), short decadal-scale geo...
Data
Full-text available
We present new archaeointensity data from Georgia from ca. 3000 BCE to 1500 CE. Forty-eight potsherds and fired clays were subjected to Thellier-type paleointensity experiment using the IZZI protocol (Tauxe and Staudigel, 2004) with routine pTRM check. We observed an excellent agreement between samples collected from the same site, supporting the p...

Citations

... The new model SHAWQ-Iron Age by Osete et al. (2020) that spans from 3300 to 2000 BP improves the description of the evolution of the Levantine Iron Age Anomaly (LIAA) formerly observed by several authors in the Levantine region and later in the Mediterranean region (e.g. Shaar et al., 2016Shaar et al., , 2017Shaar et al., , 2018Davies and Constable, 2017;Béguin et al., 2019;Rivero-Montero et al., 2021). According to Osete et al. (2020), the LIAA is related to a normal flux patch at the CMB below Arabian Peninsula, which was observed starting from around 2950 BP. ...
... and Shaar et al. (2011) have been termed "geomagnetic spikes." Unusually high-intensity values for similar ages have subsequently also been found in new archeomagnetic data from Turkey (Ertepinar et al. 2012), Georgia (Shaar et al. 2013), the Canary Islands (de Groot et al. 2015), and as far away as South Korea (Hong et al. 2013) and Texas (Bourne et al. 2016). Shaar et al. (2016) argue for a regional nature of the spike with unknown eastward extent, while the South Korean and Texan data might hint at a global character. ...