Tuija Hautala-Hirvioja's research while affiliated with University of Lapland and other places

Publications (9)

Article
The Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Lapland in Rovaniemi Finland, and the Regional Museum of Lapland organized an international conference Souvenirs in Motion: Cultural and Historical Perspectives on the Souvenir as a Research Object with the support of the Finnish Cultural Foundation. The reason for organizing the conference was th...
Article
Artikkelissani tarkastelen pääasiassa runoistaan ja musiikistaan tunnetun saamelaistaiteilijan Nils-Aslak Valkeapään (1943–2001) myöhempää 1980- ja 1990-luvun kuvataidetta. Tutkimukseni on monitieteinen, ja rakennan analyysikehikkoni taidehistorian tutkimusperinteen sekä saamen- ja alkuperäiskansatutkimuksen pohjalta. Esitän, että erityisesti inter...
Article
Finnish artists depicted Lapland as a frontier. The position of the Lappish landscape as a part of the Finnish landscape painting tradition is explored through a framework based on art and cultural history as well as humanistic and cultural geography. Paintings from three historical periods are analyzed: the early and later period of Finland as an...
Article
This article examines how Finnish artists depicted the Sámi people in their paintings from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the Second World War. In the first paintings that represented the Sámi, the attitude was very romantic and artists were not interested in knowing the Sámi culture or even in encountering the Sámi people. In the ninet...
Article
Extra t.p. with thesis statement inserted. Thesis (doctoral)--Jyväskylän yliopisto, 1999. Includes bibliographical references (p. 214-229) and index.

Citations

... She describes the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s as the Lapponism, the golden years of landscape and tourism in Lapland. Anyhow, in this period, only a few Finnish artists depicted Sámi culture because the Sámi were thought to be primitive and not included as part of Finnish culture (Hautala-Hirvioja, 2011). At the same time, making visual arts in Western sense, such as painting, was not part of the nomadic Sámi culture. ...
... By the end of the nineteenth century the pressure towards gaining independence from Russia was increasing, and with it the need to establish a coherent national identity. The Sami identity did not match the national ambitions to construct the image of a modern Western country (see Häyrynen 1997; Hautala-Hirvioja 2006:101). Likewise, the image of a primitive people living close to nature had been built up through Darwinist social anthropology, while at the same time wider international discussions were going on concerning the status of the Finns as an 'inferior' Mongolian race. ...