Tony Wigram's research while affiliated with University of Melbourne and other places

Publications (45)

Article
This chapter begins by outlining the challenges of preparing a chapter on evidence-based practice (EBP) to underpin the use of music as a therapeutic tool in treatment, in the overall frame of music, health, and wellbeing. It then reviews the terminology of EBP and evidence-based medicine, and discusses autism spectrum disorders and EBP. The chapte...
Article
This article reviews the career and publications of Prof. Tony Wigram. This enables the reader to follow the changing face of British music therapy during the period from its origins to the present day. Through tracking the career of a prominent and internationally renowned UK therapist, it is possible to illustrate the ways in which music therapy...
Article
Full-text available
Mood changes in four male participants with traumatic brain injury (TBI) were observed following their participation in a 15-session song-singing programme. An analysis of the song material was undertaken to categorise the songs according to the predominant mood they portrayed. Results showed significant differences between participants for all moo...
Article
The assessment for parenting competencies for parents of children potentially in need of care involves an evaluation of their relationship with their child, and the interaction that underpins that relationship. The “Assessment of Parenting Competences” (APC) music therapy assessment provides a structured series of interactional exercises that allow...
Article
The context of this article was an inaugural lecture given in the Faculty of Humanities, Aalborg University. The author is looking at our position as a profession in relation to our colleagues in the natural science professions, and takes the issues of clinical assessment within the context of diagnosing communication disordered children as a compa...
Article
Accessible summary• I found out how people with an intellectual disability and people without an intellectual disability reacted to different pieces of music.• People with an intellectual disability reacted in the same way as people without an intellectual disability.• If you have difficulty deciding the type of music that helps you stay calm, ask...
Article
Some forms of dementia particularly affect the frontal parts of the brain which, in some cases, causes the onset of severe behavioural and psychological symptoms. No specific treatment for the primary diseases that cause these frontotemporal dementia conditions has yet been developed, and pharmacological treatment of the psychiatric symptoms is dif...
Article
Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint engagement episodes. The randomized controlled study (n = 10) emp...
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This paper introduces a research design to measure effects of individual music therapy with mentally ill children and adolescents on symptoms, competencies, and quality of life. In a pilot project, seven children (five boys and two girls, 4 to 11 years of age) who suffered from various mental and behavioural problems were assessed. Five children re...
Article
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The generation of indigenous music therapy knowledge is reliant on the creation of relevant and adequate tools for investigation of musical phenomena. This article proposes a model of musical analysis that focuses on articulating the dynamics of a therapy group, as heard in their improvised material. Narrative descriptions are generated that can be...
Article
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This article identifies existing research and clinical activity utilising music therapy with mainstream children, as well as a potential need for music therapy with this client group. A systematic review was undertaken of music therapy literature relating to work with children in mainstream schools: 60 papers were identified, 12 of which were outco...
Conference Paper
The HANDS project is designed for Helping Autism-diagnosed Navigate and Develop Socially (HANDS) and combines studies within the pedagogical and psychological fields with the more technological field of Persuasive Design (PD). Functional deficits in social ability are considered in teenagers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in relation to underl...
Article
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A growing body of literature on therapeutic songwriting with diverse clinical populations indicates that clinicians employ a wide range of approaches. The purpose of this research was to establish trends in the clinical practice of songwriting as implemented across a range of clinical populations. Responses to a 21-question online survey were obtai...
Article
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and play sessions with toys, and using standardized to...
Article
Music therapy has been shown to be efficacious in experimental studies. However, there is little empirical research knowledge about what elements of music therapy influence its effectiveness in clinical practice. Children and adolescents with psychopathology (N=75) were assessed before and after participating in individual music therapy with 1 out...
Article
Songwriting as a therapeutic intervention has received increasing attention in the field of music therapy over the past decade however much of the publications focus on clinical outcomes rather than methods of practice. This paper, part of a two-part research report into trends in the clinical practice of songwriting, aims to describe the most freq...
Article
Music therapy has been found to be effective for children and adolescents with psychopathology, but its effectiveness in routine practice is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether individual music therapy as provided in outpatient services is an effective treatment for this group of clients and to examine potential predictors of its...
Article
OBJECTIVE Music therapy is a psychotherapeutic method that uses musical interaction to help people with serious mental illness to develop relationships and to address issues they may not be able to using words alone. We aimed to examine the effects of music therapy for people with schizophrenia. METHOD We reviewed all randomised trials comparing m...
Article
Adopting a knowledge-based controversy perspective, this article considers critically the ‘fit’ or appropriateness of the so-called ‘gold standard’ of assessment – the Randomised Controlled Trial. It sets the growing dominance of this method within music therapy in the contexts of medical work and the changing social relations of medical expertise,...
Article
Background Children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) presenting with significant limitations in conventional forms of verbal and non-verbal communication are found to respond positively to music therapy intervention involving both active, improvizational methods and receptive music therapy approaches. Improvizational musical ac...
Article
People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulties with communication, behaviour and/or social interaction. Music therapy uses music and its elements to enable people to communicate and to express their feelings. In this way music therapy addresses some of the core problems of people with ASD. This review set out to assess the evidence f...
Article
The purpose of this article is to present results of a research study examining learning ability in individuals with Rett syndrome. The material for this article was drawn from a more extensive doctoral study, designed to investigate intentional communication in this population, through the use of songs in music therapy. Rett syndrome is a neurolog...
Article
A six-year-old girl with Rett syndrome was assessed in a multi-disciplinary specialist therapy clinic and aspects of her responsiveness and developmental potential were found in the music therapy assessment. Functional hand use, eye-referencing, motivated and intentional communication were observed and reported through video analysis of a 30 min se...
Article
Full-text available
To examine changes in the relationship between intonation, voice range and mood following music therapy programmes in people with traumatic brain injury. Data from four case studies were pooled and effect size, ANOVA and correlation calculations were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Subjects sang three self-selected songs for 1...
Article
Music therapy is a psychotherapeutic method that uses musical interaction as a means of communication and expression. The aim of the therapy is to help people with serious mental illness to develop relationships and to address issues they may not be able to using words alone. To review the effects of music therapy, or music therapy added to standar...
Article
The objectives of this review were to examine the overall efficacy of music therapy for children and adolescents with psychopathology, and to examine how the size of the effect of music therapy is influenced by the type of pathology, client's age, music therapy approach, and type of outcome. Eleven studies were included for analysis, which resulted...
Article
Systematic data from a multidisciplinary clinical assessment of a large series of females with Rett syndrome (RS; n=87) is presented. Participants' ages ranged from 2 years 1 month to 44 years 10 months. Areas assessed included oromotor skills, feeding problems, growth, breathing abnormalities, mobility, postural abnormalities and joint deformities...
Article
Data on features of regression and pre-regression developmental history in a case series of 53 girls and women with Rett syndrome are presented. Consistent with the diagnostic criteria, hand skills and verbal or non-verbal communication skills were the most common skills lost during regression. Play and motor skills were also lost in half the cases...
Article
When children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are assessed in music therapy, significant strengths, potentials and resources emerge that may remain hidden in other, more formalised assessments. Therefore, it is becoming more necessary to develop a systematic method of describing this responsiveness, in order to define the expectations of ther...
Article
Full-text available
Notes on Music Therapy: Improvisation, Communication and Culture By: Even Ruud Comment A: Improvisation, Interplay and Interpretation By: Ulla Holck Comment B: Music and Identity By: Thomas Schepelern Comment C: A Multiparadigmatic Adventure By: Lars Ole Bonde Comment D: Communication, Culture, and Context By:Tony Wigman Closing Comments By: Even R...
Article
Examines the psychological and physiological effects of sound by considering a selection of the literature that exists on the effect of music on physical conditions such as pain, muscle tone, blood pressure, and heart rate. Specifically, studies on blood pressure and heart rate, clinical conditions, and the effect of pulsed low frequency sinusoidal...
Article
Each of us who learns to talk to you, each of us who manages to function at all in your society, each of us who manages to reach out and make a connection with you, is operating in alien territory, making contact with alien beings. We spend our entire lives doing this, and then you tell us that we can't relate. Jim Sinclair, 1993 (diagnosed with hi...

Citations

... In this study, nurses opted MT for AD patients and it was used twice a week (Baker et al. 2008). It was given to the patients when their caregiver activities were going on to avoid unnecessary disruptive behavior of patients. ...
... Musical activity itself involves different expressive qualities as well as dynamic shapes and dialogs. Musical activity also represents the opportunity to build alternative ways to communicate and help children to interact with and connect to other people (Goldstein, 2002;Møller et al., 2002;Thaut, 2005). The studies above show the potential of music therapy for the development of children with autism spectrum disorder. ...
... The valuing of human experience in context and in action as a valid source of knowledge has been an antipode to objectivist research. Debates in music therapy have highlighted some of the tensions between these different positions (Ansdell, 2006;De-Nora, 2006;Wigram, 2006), while some relatively recent perspectives suggest a more integral understanding (Abrams, 2010). These debates can inform the emerging dialogues around service evaluation methodology and its value in music therapy. ...
... A report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Bjerkan & Leiknes, 2016) summarized five different systematic reviews (Gold et al., 2006(Gold et al., , 2005(Gold et al., , 2009Lee & Thyer, 2013;Mössler et al., 2011) on the therapeutic effect of music therapy. They concluded that music therapy as addition to treatment as usual for patients with schizophrenia possibly has a better effect than standard care on general health, mental health and social functioning. ...
... The commissioning institution's requirement or preference for funding evidence-based practice, guidance and advice (Cochrane, 2014; National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), 2014) now necessitates music therapists measure outcomes of music therapy and provide empirical quantitative data to evidence the effectiveness of the intervention in addition to case study and qualitative research evidence. Reviews of the music therapy literature show a gradual, but consistent, increase in clinical research combining quantitative and qualitative methods peaking between 2002 and 2006 (Tsiris et al., 2014;Wigram and Sutton, 2011). There still remains a need to develop standardised tools, for use across the music therapy profession, to measure, analyse and record small changes in a client's responses during a music therapy session (Wigram and Wosch, 2007). ...
... Music as an adjunct to traditional medicine for the treatment of those with mental health needs, has been supported by evidence to be an effective intervention for promoting mental illness (Edwards, 2006; Gold et al., 2009 Gold et al., , 2005 Maratos et al., 2008; Silverman, 2006). A systematic review and meta-analysis have demonstrated that music is effective for the management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia patients (Ueda et al., 2013). ...
... In line with an integral understanding of evidence in music therapy (Abrams, 2010), the value and relevance of different evidence pathways and of different methodologies depend on the area and the aim of each investigation. This way of thinking challenges traditional assumptions around hierarchies of evidence and has promoted contextual responses to questions focusing not only on what counts as evidence but also on how we assess the quality of evidence (DeNora & Ansdell, 2014;Stige et al., 2009;Wigram & Gold, 2012). The National Health Service (NHS Health Research Authority, 2013) and some music therapy publications (e.g., Tsiris et al., 2014a) have outlined the value and different functions of research alongside other evidence pathways, such as audit, clinical assessment, and service evaluation projects. ...
... Interviews were conducted in Danish and audio recorded. The analysis of the interviews followed the systematic procedure of Phenomenological Microanalysis as reported by McFerran and Grocke (Wosch & Wigram, 2007). ...
... Compared with recorded listening programs, therapist-led music therapy interventions involve more interactive approaches to music listening that provide education about the therapeutic potential of music and often integrate additional treatment components (eg, lyric discussion, drawing or journaling) to address additional biopsychosocial factors that contribute to chronic pain [14,15]. Music imagery, a receptive music therapy intervention that combines music listening, imagery, and verbal processing, has been used to address a variety of patient needs (eg, symptoms related to posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], cancer, mood disorders, and chronic pain [16][17][18][19]). ...