Tony Meppem's research while affiliated with University of New England (Australia) and other places

Publications (4)

Article
In selecting six keywords from the environmental discourse the authors argue that language's 'double motivation' reveals a dialectical structure through which it simultaneously expresses both a utopian narrative and an ideologically driven myth of totality and consensus. The ambiguity of these keywords is of critical significance to all those invol...
Article
Attempting to develop processes for the formulation of sustainable development policy is imperative in contemporary society. Ecological economics offers the opportunity to consider the integration of economic, socio-cultural and environmental aspects of problems in sustainable development policy processes. Practical engagement in the integration of...
Article
Despite the urgency of the ecological crisis the steady continuation of environmental degradation suggests that new ways of interpreting problems and acting with environmental integrity may need to be considered. This paper draws on a broad range of contemporary theory to argue that the conventional conceptualization of environmental problems has r...
Article
The major theme of the following discussion is the importance of a transdisciplinary approach to guide sustainability-related planning and management activities. The proposed approach involves much more than the usual interaction between partners from different disciplines. A revised process is needed to allow real cooperation in sustainability pla...

Citations

... Defining consent in relation to an inherently intergenerational concern presents additional challenges in defining the concept. Fundamental questions in a CBS process include how consent is gained or given, how and when it can be withdrawn, and who constitutes the community giving consent [46]. Other concerns include clearly defined and collectively created understandings of risks and benefits related to such a project, and how to communicate this process to future generations [39,47]. ...
... More emphasis should be given to natural science education, which should be reoriented to promote awareness and concern for nature and the environment, leading to the creation of essential values, such as honesty, humility, and responsibility, which support progress toward achieving the desired outcomes [33]. As debates and arguments on sustainable development from various perspectives (philosophy, science, policy, etc.) are in a state of stagnation, the only recourse lies in transdisciplinary involvement for promoting understanding to stimulate dynamic change and action rather than simply predicting future outcomes on the basis of specific analyses of the economy or environmental conditions at a particular timeline [9]. ...
... Furthermore, use of the "community" concept in sustainability research is prominent. As Thomsen et al. (2009) and Meppem (2000) point out, "the community" is often conceived as an overarching pathway to finding solutions to sustainability issues, particularly as human behaviour is key to sustainability. However, the concept of community is abstract, with a long and complicated etymology in the English language, causing its use to frequently be ambiguous and unspecified. ...
... The intractability of problems such as corporate sustainability, sustainable development and climate change challenge the viability of assumptions and paradigms within which these problems were created. The challenges associated with sustainable development can be seen to be partly a consequence of the Newtonian paradigm [24,32,33,60], in which reality is understood through analysis of its components. Periods of "revolutionary science", Kuhn [61] argues, are needed to disrupt "normal science" by challenging the conceptual frameworks or scientific paradigms underpinning scientific theories, thereby avoiding being "caged by the paradigms within which we currently operate" ( [62], p. 98). ...