Tim Beringer's research while affiliated with Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and other places

Publications (6)

Article
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Modeling of climate change impacts have mainly been focused on a small number of annual staple crops that provide most of the world’s calories. Crop models typically do not represent perennial crops despite their high economic, nutritional, or cultural value. Here we assess climate change impacts on global tea production, chosen because of its high...
Article
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In this Letter, the PANGAEA repository was referred to incorrectly in the ‘Code availability’ and ‘Data availability’ sections of Methods: the link should be 10.1594/PANGAEA.893761 instead of 10.1594/PANGAEA.877266. In addition, the sentence, “However, the more commonly used system 2 (75 kg ha−1 yr−1) generates roughly the same benefits as system 1...
Article
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Land-use changes are critical for climate policy because native vegetation and soils store abundant carbon and their losses from agricultural expansion, together with emissions from agricultural production, contribute about 20 to 25 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions1,2. Most climate strategies require maintaining or increasing land-based carbon³...
Article
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This comment raises concerns regarding the way in which a new European directive, aimed at reaching higher renewable energy targets, treats wood harvested directly for bioenergy use as a carbon-free fuel. The result could consume quantities of wood equal to all Europe's wood harvests, greatly increase carbon in the air for decades, and set a danger...
Article
While some studies find no room for the dedicated use of land for bioenergy because of growing food needs, other studies estimate large bioenergy potentials, even at levels greater than total existing human plant harvest. Analyzing this second category of studies, we find they have in various ways counted the carbon benefits of using land for biofu...

Citations

... Remote sensing [11,12], crop simulation models (CSM) [13,14], and other statistical methods [15,16] are the most popular among them. These techniques are also used to find the climate impact on the yield of different types of crops [17,18]. Machine learning (ML) techniques and CSMs have been used to predict yields of several annual crops such as wheat, soybean, corn, maize, sugarcane, etc. ...
... En relation avec cette demande quantitative, la globalisation du mode de production en AB, en raison de ses faibles rendements (Van der Vossen, 2005 ;Reganold et Wachter, 2016 ;Lesur-Dumoulin et al., 2017 ;Seufert et al., 2019), pourrait conduire à étendre les superficies cultivées. Il en résulterait une destruction potentielle des réserves de biosphère ou, par la délocalisation des zones de production, des conséquences négatives sur le changement climatique (Searchinger et al., 2019). D'un point de vue écologique, il serait donc préférable de poursuivre un objectif d'accroissement de la productivité dont l'indicateur est le rendement agronomique (Bakehe, 2018), plutôt que des modes de production qui exigent un accroissement des superficies cultivées. ...
... According to their results, the average annual sink is −1.11 ± 0.38 petagrams of carbon, which is equivalent to about 45 per cent of annual Chinese anthropogenic emissions. Searchinger T. et al. [20] found that standard methods for assessing the impact of land use on GHG emissions underestimate the ability of land, which is not used for agriculture, to store carbon. As a solution, they propose a carbon benefits index that measures how different way of land use contribute to the capacity to store carbon. ...
... Utilizing wood biomass as a substitute for coal increases CO2 emissions and worsens climate change for many decades or more [34]. Meeting U.S. national emissions reduction goals requires net emissions to drop by approximately 50% by 2030, reach net zero by 2050, and be net negative beyond 2100 [2,4]. ...
... The main types of biomass for bioenergy include lignocellulosic woody biomass (e.g., pine, eucalyptus, willow), lignocellulosic crops (e.g., perennial grasses, agricultural residues, crops for oil, sugar or starch), and waste biomass such as wet manure or municipal solid waste (MSW). The use of primary biomass sources (i.e., dedicated crops) for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) raises concerns about sustainability due to the potential competition with other land uses and the need for fertilisation and irrigation [23,24,25]. Secondary sources of biomass (e.g., waste and residues) are potentially more environmentally sustainable, and economical [26,27]. ...