Thomas O. Nitsch's research while affiliated with Creighton University and other places

Publications (22)

Article
Purpose – Aims to discuss whether Roman Catholicism can legitimately lay claim to a distinctive brand of Economics, as well as to concepts of Social Justice and the Common Good. Design/methodology/approach – A conceptual approach is taken. Findings – To what traditionally has been packaged under the rubric of “Social Catholicism” the author has a...
Article
The title is intentionally facetious, rhetorical and to be taken cum grano salis. For certain ones prone to confusing fact with fancy, the events in the USSR of 1989 and the appearance of John Paul II’s Centesimus Annus on the heels thereof respectively sounded the death-knell for Marx’s system and signaled papal acquisence in the axiom that what w...
Article
In a seeming attempt to legitimate or otherwise dignify social economics (Économie sociale, etc.), “named” economists (Adam Smith, Karl Marx et al.) have been dubbed social economists and/or regarded as having made significant but unrecognised contributions thereto. Conspicuously absent from that roster of celebrities are Léon Walras, économiste so...
Article
Marx and Smith share the accusation of musing about future society, but of being much too vague about the form. At the same time, there is no glaring dearth of those who hailed the collapse of the Soviet economy as proof positive of the failure of Marxism, of Marx’s system. This boils down to the question of whether or not Marx in any way foresaw/e...
Article
The author in this essay surrounds John Paul II with professional economists from the past and the present, such as Taussig, Keynes, Richard and Peggy Musgrave, and Stiglitz, all of whom have very similar reservations concerning the social beneficence of the “free market”. As with these professionals, John Paul II’s vision of the social economy emb...
Article
From Aristotle to Scitovsky the nature and scope of human economy and economics have remained essentially the same, viz. the prudent/efficient/welfaremaximizing administration/utilization of the scarce resources (chrèmata, “choses utiles,” etc.) comprising the household and the expertise there-of. Aristotle’s protégé, Theophrastus (d. 287 B.C.), we...
Chapter
Modern society (the social system) conceived structural-functionally is constituted of four basic institutions (or subsystems) designated as follows: ideology (the meaning system), polity (the organization system), economy (the adaptation or provisioning system), and family (the belonging system). Each of these, in turn, may be analyzed and further...
Article
Documents and notes the specific content of Marx's postulate (in the original German edition of Das Kapital, 1867) that “der Mensch von Natur...ein gesellschaftliches thier ist”. All the prominent English editions (unlike the French, Russian, Italian and Spanish versions examined) except one omit the “by nature” qualifier. Suggests reasons for and...
Article
I. Introduction In their recent pastoral letter, the Catholic bishops of this country have reputedly taken a new approach in rooting their moral imperatives in the Bible. As opposed to the established, official convention of “proof-texting”, the US bishops focus on certain biblical themes which presumably “speak to” contemporary issues and problems...
Article
Misbegotten, misnamed, antisocial homo oeconomicus is now contrasted with the more human personae of homo oeconomicus honorabilis, the “open”/ “Semi‐economic Man” of Pantaleoni and Marshall, the still arcane homo oeconomicus humanus of Nitsch and Malina, and (most recently) the positivistic (neo‐) homo socio‐economicus of Etzioni et al., which ‐‐in...
Article
Introduction On 15 May 1891 Pope Leo XIII issued what has become known as “the Great Social Encyclical”, Rerum Novarum: De Conditione Opificum; or, “Revolutionary Change: On the Condition of the Working Classes”. Forty years thereafter, Pope Pius XI issued the second GSE, Quadragesimo Anno: On the Restoration of the Social Order (15 May 1931); and,...
Article
The new rich of the nineteenth century were not brought up to large expenditures, and preferred the power which investment gave them to the pleasures of immediate consumption. In fact, it was precisely the inequality in the distribution of wealth which made possible those vast accumulations of fixed wealth and of capital improvements which distingu...
Chapter
The history of social economics (l’économie sociale, etc.), like that of political economy before it, begins with some conceptual or theoretical reflection on human economic activity, to which a designation is subsequently accorded. As that expression catches on, it comes to be appropriated by diverse views of and approaches to that praxis and disc...
Article
Introduction We would like to make it clear at the outset that the present essay is not an essay in theology. Theology deals with the articulation of some symbol of the Ultimate or All, i.e. some “Theos”, or God. Rather, our concern is with humans and their perceptions and experiences of some Ultimate or All; this concern is typical of a religious...
Article
In previous efforts I have dated the birth of (modern) Social Catholicism (alias: Roman-Catholic Social Economycs) with the publication of the closely associated works of Charles de Coux (1832) and Alban de Villeneuve-Bargemont (1834/37). If indeed (and without going all the way back to Jesus of Nazareth, via Thomas Aquinas, Jerome and Ambrose et a...
Article
The subtitle to the English translation of this work (not employed in the Spanish original) bills it as “a theological critique of capitalism”. At the same time, it proves a veritable tour de force for students of the history and philosophy of economics (erstwhile political economy) as well. And, this is especially true for those who, like the pres...
Article
In her popular Development of Economic Analysis, Ingrid Rima writes early on of the “compatibility” of “emphasis on the state as an instrument to achieve socially optimal results…with what has come to be called social economics”. Subsequently (1978, p. 322; 1986, p. 396), she treats of J.M. Clark's “crucial” contribution to the development (1920s/1...
Article
In previous efforts I have indicated that Social Catholicism, qua Roman-Catholic Social Economycs or Économie politique chrétienne, is now at the one and a half century mark, given its formal introduction with the publication of Charles de Coux's Essais d' économie politique at Paris/Lyon in 1832. This was soon to be followed by Alban de Villeneuve...

Citations

... The Catholic Church played an important role in the history of the social economy, either as an entity responsible for carrying out certain social support activities, as an organiser of these entities (Nitsch 1990), or even as a promoter of political debates that eventually resulted in the training of economists who became major influencers of the social economy, with the objective of reducing the impoverishment of the population (Solari 2007;Moulaert and Ailenei 2005). ...
... Thus, whereas (classical) political economy developed primarily around the two more dominant forms of economic activity characterising capitalism, social economics simultaneously developed around the third -albeit remaining less widely recognised. Nitsch (1987) distinguishes three strands of social economic thought as it developed in Europe over the next two centuries: secularpositive, secular-normative, and religious-normative. Seeking an alternative conception of economic systems, this literature was often highly philosophical. ...
Reference: Social economics
... He argued that social welfare is more important than economic (Pressman, 2001, p. 111). Interestingly, Nitsch (2000) indicates that many authors attempted to legitimise social economy by looking for social economic ideas in works of "mainstream" economists, including Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John M. Keynes in Joseph A. Schumpeter. He adds that the authors, who in his opinion really contributed to social economy, were ignored: Léon Walras, François Quesnay, J.B. Say, Friderich von Wieser and Kunt Wicksell (Nitsch, 2000, p. 739). ...
... The first reason for taking the legacy of the natural body in Marxism seriously is simply that the reasons not to are unsound and threaten to forestall important (10) Interestingly, History and Class Consciousness was published a decade before Marx's 1844 Manuscripts (see Jay, 1984, page 102). (11) Not only is the communal nature of human beings evident in Marx's early works, but it is not abandoned in Capital, despite several publishers' omission of the words`von Natur' from a passage implying that humans are naturally social (Nitsch, 1992). academic and political discussions. ...
... Assuming, however, the aim of one's leadership is generally altruistic and focused on the promulgation of some greater good, the wellbeing of people who will be affected by the outcomes of leadership decisions must be considered. This is where social justice --the full and equitable participation of all people in a society, the fair and humane distribution of resources, as well as making a priority of people's physical and psychological safety (Morgan & Vera, 2006) --comes in. Rawls (1999) contends that "justice is the first virtue of social institutions" (p. 3) but societies and their institutions are seldom well ordered and are not necessarily adept at meeting the needs or wants of their citizens. ...