Thomas G Weidner's research while affiliated with Ball State University and other places

Publications (48)

Article
Interprofessional education is an area of emphasis within healthcare. Little is known regarding what other healthcare professions athletic training students engage with during interprofessional education. Therefore, our purpose was to identify the healthcare students that athletic training students engage with in the classroom/laboratory and during...
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Context Health care education needs to include methods of teaching and evaluation that are realistic and mimic patient care. Objective To follow up on previous research regarding the methods athletic training educators use to evaluate and teach athletic training students' clinical skills during clinical experiences and in the classroom/laboratory....
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Context: Athletic trainers provide psychological support, counseling, intervention, and referral to patients during clinical practice. However, students are rarely exposed to real-life opportunities to develop these skills. Objective: To determine if a small-group standardized patient (SP) encounter improved athletic training students' interpersona...
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Context Simulations and standardized patient (SP) encounters are used to provide clinical experiences for students. In athletic training, no research has examined the perceived educational benefits of these interventions. Objective To explore athletic training students' perceptions regarding small group SP encounters and individual case-based simu...
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Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has been recommended as an educational strategy to improve students' skill acquisition and supplement the role of the clinical instructor (CI). How frequently students actually engage in PAL in different settings is unknown. To determine the perceived frequency of planned and unplanned PAL (peer modeling, peer feedback...
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Our previous research determined the frequency of participation and perceived effect of formal and informal continuing education (CE) activities. However, actual preferences for and barriers to CE must be characterized. To determine the types of formal and informal CE activities preferred by athletic trainers (ATs) and barriers to their participati...
Article
Full Citation: Weidner TG. A call for evidence-based athletic training education. Athl Train Educ J. 2010;5(3):117-118. PersPectives in At educAtion THE CALL "Evidence-based practice" has become a buzzword in medical and health professions. As our colleagues build a body of best evidence in medical education, 1 so must athletic training educators r...
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Continuing education (CE) is intended to promote professional growth and, ultimately, to enhance professional practice. To determine certified athletic trainers' participation in formal (ie, approved for CE credit) and informal (ie, not approved for CE credit) CE activities and the perceived effect these activities have on professional practice wit...
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Context: Standardized patients are more prominently used to both teach and evaluate students' clinical skills and abilities. Objective: To investigate whether athletic training students perceived an encounter with a standardized patient (SP) as realistic and worthwhile and to determine their perceived comfort in future lower extremity evaluations w...
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Context: Standardized patients are widely used in health care programs to both teach and evaluate the communication and clinical skills of students. Although athletic training education programs (ATEPs) commonly use simulations, little information exists related to the use and implementation of standardized patients (SPs). Objective: To provide str...
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Appropriate methods for evaluating clinical proficiencies are essential to ensuring entry-level competence in athletic training. To identify the methods Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) use to evaluate student performance of clinical proficiencies. Cross-sectional design. Public and private institutions in National Athletic Trainers' Associatio...
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Objective: To examine the occurrence, benefits, and preferences for peer assisted learning (PAL) in medical and allied health clinical education, and to identify areas in athletic training which need further research. Data Sources: Using relevant terms, five databases were searched for the period 1980–2006 regarding literature on the use of PAL in...
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Full-text available
Appropriate methods for evaluating clinical proficiencies are essential in ensuring entry-level competence. To investigate the common methods athletic training education programs use to evaluate student performance of clinical proficiencies. Cross-sectional design. Public and private institutions nationwide. All program directors of athletic traini...
Article
Certified athletic trainers who serve as Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) in the collegiate setting are balancing various roles (eg, patient care and related administrative tasks, clinical education). Whether this balancing act is associated with role strain in athletic trainers has not been examined. To examine the degree of, and contributing...
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Athletic training educators often anecdotally suggest that athletic training students enhance their learning by teaching their peers. However, peer-assisted learning (PAL) has not been examined within athletic training education to provide evidence for PAL's current use or for its use as a pedagogic tool. To assess the effectiveness of intentional,...
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Athletic training education programs must provide the proper type and amount of clinical supervision in order for athletic training students to obtain appropriate clinical education and to meet Board of Certification examination requirements. To assess athletic training students' perceptions of the type and amount of clinical supervision received d...
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Editor's Note: This manuscript is from the Distinguished Educator Keynote presentation given at the 2005 Professional Educators' Conference.
Article
Athletic training educators often anecdotally suggest that athletic training students enhance their learning by teaching their peers. However, peer-assisted learning (PAL) has not been examined within athletic training education in order to provide evidence for its current use or as a pedagogic tool. To describe the prevalence of PAL in athletic tr...
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For optimal clinical education of athletic training students, Clinical Instructor Educators and program directors need to proactively select, train, and evaluate their Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs). To assess the relative importance and applicability of ACI standards to certified athletic trainers employed in different athletic training clin...
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OBJECTIVE: To develop standards and associated criteria for the selection, training, and evaluation of athletic training approved clinical instructors (ACIs). DESIGN AND SETTING: A previously developed set of 7 physical therapy clinical instructor standards/criteria and 2 additional standards/criteria developed through a review of the literature we...
Article
To determine if exercise training affects the severity and duration of a naturally acquired upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in sedentary subjects. Subjects were sedentary volunteers (two or fewer days a week of exercise for less than 30 minutes a day for the previous three months), 18-29 years of age, with a naturally acquired URTI (three...
Article
OBJECTIVE: To present a historical perspective of the development and evolution of clinical education in the medical and allied health professions, with a special interest in athletic training; to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the depth and breadth of the structured and formal clinical education needed in athletic training, for bo...
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OBJECTIVE: To determine the helpfulness of clinical-education-setting standards in the professional preparation of entry-level certified athletic trainers. DESIGN AND SETTING: We developed a 22-item questionnaire based on the 12 standards presented by Weidner and Laurent. Subjects used a Likert scale (0 = no help, 5 = very helpful) to indicate thei...
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OBJECTIVES: To assess the type and amount of clinical supervision athletic training students received during clinical education. DESIGN AND SETTING: An online survey was conducted with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. SUBJECTS: Head athletic trainers from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I (28), Division II (3...
Article
To succeed in the role of clinical instructor requires considerable attention. CIs can refer to the nine categories of clinical instructor qualities, characteristics, and skills to guide in the preparation for, and evaluation of, the expectations in this role. Effective CIs can enhance the profession by developing students who become skilled and se...
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OBJECTIVE: To compare the perceptions of students and clinical instructors regarding helpful clinical instructor characteristics. DESIGN AND SETTING: We developed a questionnaire containing helpful clinical instructor characteristics for facilitating student learning from a review of the medical and allied health clinical education literature. Resp...
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OBJECTIVE: To develop and test standards and associated criteria for the selection and evaluation of a clinical education setting in athletic training. DESIGN AND SETTING: A previously validated set of 20 standards for physical therapy clinical education settings, the associated criteria, and 2 related evaluation forms were systematically judged, r...
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The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether exercise training affects the severity and duration of a rhinovirus-caused upper respiratory illness (URI). Subjects who were rhinovirus 16 (RV 16) antibody-free completed a graded exercise test. Thirty-four individuals (ages 18-29 yr) of moderate fitness (32 mL.kg-1.min-1 to 60 mL.kg-1.min...
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To determine the kinematic changes that may occur during running with a cold of known etiology and to assess the impact of select accompanying upper respiratory illness symptoms. In this nonrandomized study, subjects with colds and subjects without colds were videotaped while exercising on a treadmill. Three weeks later, the trials were repeated. E...
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Upper respiratory illness (URI) may cause more frequent acute disability among athletes than all other diseases combined. The purposes of this study were to determine the impact of a rhinovirus-caused URI on resting pulmonary function submaximal exercise responses and on maximal exercise functional capacity. Twenty-four men and 21 women (18-29 yr)...
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Upper respiratory illness may cause more disability among athletes than all other diseases combined. This paper presents the essential epidemiology, risks of infection, and transmission features of upper respiratory illness. Those who provide health care for athletes must understand the subsequent implications of an upper respiratory illness on spo...
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Continuing education for certified athletic trainers is both required and essential. The purpose of this study was to determine the need, including solutions and priorities, for continuing education for athletic trainers in various employment settings. Focus group sessions were conducted during the Spring 1992 District 4 meeting of the National Ath...
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Upper respiratory illness (URI) may cause more acute disability among athletes than all other diseases combined. This paper presents the essential epidemiological, infectious, and transmission features of URI. Those who provide health care for athletes must also understand the subsequent implications of URI on sport and exercise participation. Whil...
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Some contend that upper respiratory illness (URI) causes more disability among athletes than all other diseases combined. The purpose of this study was to describe the reporting behaviors, activity levels, and perceived physical performance levels of intercollegiate athletes with an URI. Respondents rated the severity of 14 cold symptoms and indica...

Citations

... An initial step towards assessing the effectiveness of collaboration is to explore the attitudes and experience of healthcare professionals towards IPC. Although respondents' perspectives on interprofessional education (IPE) in educational settings have been extensively examined by several studies [17][18][19][20][21][22][23], understanding healthcare professionals' perspectives on IPC in specific healthcare settings is paramount to addressing the barriers to effective IPC. The objective of this study was to explore the perspectives of healthcare professionals towards IPC in a large public academic medical center. ...
... 6,9,10 Standardized patient encounters are superior to more traditional forms of instruction and assessment because the experience of interacting with a real person enables students to be better suited for developing interpersonal and interprofessional communication 7,8,10,11 and clinical skills. 12,13 Because a majority of SP encounters are structured to resemble an ordinary patient interaction, the student has limited time to obtain a patient history, complete a physical examination, and communicate the treatment plan. 11 Because of this, SPs provide a consistent and uniform method for both teaching and assessment 5,6,9,10 with continued emphasis on providing valuable feedback 14 to the examiner. ...
... 8,9 If executed properly, the SP encounter has the potential of introducing a high level of fidelity, thus creating a perception of realism that allows the learners to immerse themselves in the experience. 7,10,11 The SP encounter provides the learners the ability to experience scenarios and patient cases in a controlled environment that reduces the risk of potential harm. 7 The reduction of potential harm to the patient through the structured experience has been noted as a means by which to increase the willingness of the learner in the encounter. ...
... Indeed, research has indicated that light-to moderate-intensity exercise may enhance the function of Infection and the Elite Athlete 237 certain immune parameters (Nieman 2000a;Shore, Shinkai, Rhind, et al. 1999) and lead to a decrease in the incidence of infectious episodes in individuals who regularly engage in such exercise, compared to more sedentary individuals (Nieman, Johanssen, and Lee 1989). Conversely, individuals who engage in prolonged moderate-to high-intensity exercise are thought to be at higher risk for contracting numerous infections than either sedentary individuals or individuals engaging in light to moderate recreational exercise (Beck 2000;Gleeson, Blannin, Sewell, and Beck 1995;Mackinnon 2000;Weidner 2001). The paradoxical relationship between exercise workload and infection risk is highlighted by the J-shaped curve (Figure 1), which shows the relationship between exercise workload and the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), with elite athletes positioned at the far right of the curve. ...
... Transmission of infectious agents between individuals mainly include airborne droplets [207], physical contact and common source exposure [208,209] . Consequently, athletes should be recommended to avoid physical contact with infected individuals, crowded environments and airborne pathogens [207,208,209], to adhere to hygiene practices including washing of hands and to avoid sharing of drinks, utensils, and towels with colleagues [210, 211] ...
... Previous research has explored SP encounters in athletic training education, including encounters specific to psychosocial intervention and referral skills. These studies have found that small-group SP encounters can improve athletic training students' psychosocial intervention and referral skills (based on objective measurement) 23 and students' confidence You have been working with the men's basketball team for the past 5 years. G is a 3-year starter on the basketball team. ...
... Athletic training clinical instructor (CI) characteristics, behaviors and skills have been reported from many different perspectives. W eidner and August were perhaps the first to 15 acknowledge that athletic trainers had received no special pedagogical preparation for assuming the role of a CI. W eidner, in separate reports with Henning acknowledges that certified 7,16,17 athletic trainers do not have the knowledge or skills to teach and evaluate AT students whom they supervise because they have had no formal supervisor training in those areas. ...
... It seems evolutionary, because professional discourse is the mechanism many preceptors use to stimulate learning and growth and provide feedback during clinical education. 22,23 Preceptors are often cited as mentors, 15,19 and in our study, many of the mentors were past preceptors or on a basic level were viewed as such (ie, supervisor, coworker). ...
... The role of reflection has also been highlighted by research exploring athletic training students' experiences during simulated patient encounters. 17 After 2 different simulated patient encounters, participants in one study identified the important role of reflection on future action. Although reflection can assist students debriefing about what just happened, the authors 17 reported that reflection also plays a big role in students' ability to identify strategies to improve the care provided during future encounters. ...
... [11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19] The development of an SP encounter is a thorough and rigorous process, which often takes several weeks of planning and training before implementation. [20][21][22][23][24] Through SP encounters, students are able to develop confidence, 13,[25][26][27] improve clinical reasoning, 13,17 collaborate 14 and communicate interprofessionally, 28 and positively impact learner motivation 27,29 and clinical skill acquisition. 13,27,29,30 Standardized patient encounters also provide each of these learning outcomes in an a safe environment resembling clinical practice. ...