Thomas C Dolan's research while affiliated with American College of Healthcare Sciences and other places

Publications (57)

Citations

... Further, negligible leadership roles in healthcare supply chains have been shown to be occupied by women, even though female medical graduates occupy substantial placements in medical schools, where their contributions in clinical leadership have been noted as invaluable (Bismark et al., 2015;Kuhlmann et al., 2017;Sarto and Veronesi, 2016). Improving leadership diversity and increasing female clinician representation in top-tier management and leadership positions, helps to address healthcare disparities more effectively and meets the needs of expanding minority population groups (Bismark et al., 2015;Dolan, 2013;Rosenberg, 2008;Sarto and Veronesi, 2016). The heterogeneity of firm leadership additionally augments firm governance, financial and social performance, as well as innovation agendas (Ahmed et al., 2013;Ferrero-Ferrero et al., 2015;Hardy-Waller, 2015;Kyaw et al., 2017). ...
... CEO turnover can have a number of negative implications for a hospital and its surrounding community. For example, one study suggested that turnover can negatively affect the hospital's relationship with the community, its medical staff, and employee morale (Dolan, 2011). Likewise, another study associated CEO change with a greater risk of rural hospital closure (Alexander & Lee, 1996). ...
... The MGH team led the design of a selfassessment survey with input from JHH drawing on elements from existing self-assessment programs. 18,[24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34] The final 29-item survey assessed 8 domains of Q&S programs: governance and management, Q&S leadership, culture, communication, quality surveillance, safety surveillance, strategy and goal-setting, and implementation. Similar to the high-reliability stages of organizational maturity, the pre-visit instrument asks respondents to place the hospital into one of 3 levels of development. ...
... These studies reinforce the idea that change management is not a quick fix, but requires a combination of leadership skills and behaviors for success. It requires leaders to successfully communicate the vision and demonstrate the need for change (Dolan, 2010) at both an emotional and intellectual level (Gill, 2003) and it requires personal attention to each individual (Reinbardt, 2004). Successful long term change is rarely achieved by using positional power or authority, but through personal influence (Gill, 2003). ...
... An increasing number of biomedical journals (and publishers) are establishing social media presences, particularly on Facebook [1, 2] and Twitter [3], but also on other social media spaces such as YouTube and LinkedIn. 2 Facebook, Twitter, and other social media channels have also been proposed as supportive communication tools for healthcare organizations [4,5], hospitals [6], and physician leaders [7], and their increased popularity is raising new questions about social-media-powered peer review [8]. ...
... Often health care leaders are people who chose a career path because they felt a desire to serve other people, to care for people less fortunate than themselves, and to make a perceptible difference in an organization or community within which they work (Pintar et al., 2007). While succession planning involves senior leader involvement, all too often too much authority rests with people higher in an organization's structure and not enough availed to employees at lower tiers of management infrastructure (Dolan, 2009). For succession management to be more successful, accountability and ideas could be meted out among multiple tiers of leadership and information shared collaboratively. ...
... (1) Whites continue to be more highly compensated than minorities, (2) When adjusted for education and experience, income disparities among men virtually disappear, but persist among women, (3) Minorities have made mixed progress in closing the income gap since 1997, (4) With the exception of Asian women, minorities have made little headway in holding senior-level management positions since 1997, (5) Minorities are less satisfied than Whites with pay, level of respect, and on-the-job treatment, but express equal satisfaction with autonomy and job security, (6) Minorities express lower levels of attachment to their jobs than do Whites, (7) more White men aspire to become CEOs than respondents in other groups, (8) A significantly higher number of minorities than Whites believe there are racial/ethnic inequities in health care management, (9) more Whites than minorities feel that race relations in their organizations are good, (10) Minorities believe they must be more qualified than others to get ahead in their organization; Whites disagree, (11) Minorities report a reduction in discrimination since 1997, particularly regarding hiring, and (12) More minorities than Whites favor efforts to increase the percentage of minorities in health care management. ...
... The principles, methods, strategies, instruments of ethics and good practices used in the management of hospitals and other healthcare units is a wide field of study, intensely analysed and debated in the scholarly literature from multiple points of view. Several issues have been analysed since the late 1990s: civic responsibility of the healthcare organisation ; the evaluation of the ethical program (Neft-Smith, Scott, Edward & Fletcher, 1997); good practices in the ethics of hospital units (Cassidy, 1998); ethical leadership (Johnston, Cruess & Cruess, 2001;Dolan, 2004;) and the challenges raised by ethics and the responsibilities of leaders in the healthcare system (Squazzo, 2012); ethical dimensions in public healthcare policies (Roberts & Reich, 2002); ethics and the safety of hospitals (Weinstein, 2002) and ethics and patient safety (Lachman, 2008); challenges of ethical committees (Collier & Sandborg, 2006;Hogstel & Curry, 2004); the ethics of decision-making (Maddalena, 2007;Slosar, 2004); ethical transparency and economic medicalisation (Poitras & Meredith, 2009); the organisational costs of ethical conflicts (Nelson, Weeks & Campfield, 2008;Hofmann, 2012); and the ethics of decisions concerning the allocation of resources (Hofmann, 2011). The aforementioned issues have the commonality that if they are not considered properly, they can weaken quality of care and organisational performance. ...
... Studies of the effectiveness of written brochures and classroom presentations for explaining the risks from contamination have shown that a better understanding was obtained following classroom presentations (Burger et al., 2003). Many investigators have looked at the effectiveness of training staff by mentoring, particularly to reduce the levels of contamination in clinical environments; this data suggests that the most effective way to train the slaughterhouse staff would be by demonstrations and mentoring (Dolan, 2004;Conner, 2005). ...
... Action methods are not new to nursing education but only a few of the action method strategies seem to have gained much popularity, and fewer still have been studied. For instance, dyads to increase student participation, role playing for teaching interviewing skills, scenarios for addressing ethical issues, and simulations to develop students' self efficacy, are action methods that have been described (Christiaens & Baldwin, 2002;Dolan, 2005;Goldenberg, Andrusyszyn & Iwasiw, 2005;Tremayne, Moriarty & Harrison, 2005). ...