Thibault Datry's research while affiliated with Cancéropôle Lyon Auvergne Rhône-Alpes (CLARA) and other places

Publications (29)

Article
Europe has experienced a substantial increase in non-indigenous crayfish species (NICS) since the mid-20th century due to their extensive use in fisheries, aquaculture and, more recently, pet trade. Despite relatively long invasion histories of some NICS and negative impacts on biodiversity and ecosystemfunctioning, large spatio-temporal analyses o...
Article
Intermittent rivers, which do not flow all year round, have biophysical functioning specificities which need to be considered when defining management policies, even more so in the current context of global change. However, in Europe intermittent rivers benefit from the same regulations as permanent rivers, which undoubtedly leads to their degradat...
Article
Rivers that do not flow year-round are the predominant type of running waters on Earth. Despite a burgeoning literature on natural flow intermittence (NFI), knowledge about the hydrological causes and ecological effects of human-induced, anthropogenic flow intermittence (AFI) remains limited. NFI and AFI could generate contrasting hydrological and...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Invasive alien species are a growing problem worldwide due to their ecological, economic and human health impacts. The “killer shrimp” Dikerogammarus villosus is a notorious invasive alien amphipod from the Ponto‐Caspian region that has invaded many fresh and brackish waters across Europe. Understandings of large‐scale population dynamics of hi...
Article
Rivers and their riparian zones are linked by reciprocal subsidies such as leaf fall or the emergence of biphasic aquatic organisms. Transfers of subsidies from freshwater to terrestrial ecosystems have been broadly studied, yet few studies have explored the transfer of aquatic organic matter (AOM) to surrounding terrestrial ecosystems as a respons...
Preprint
The temporal stability of ecological properties increases with spatial scale and levels of biological organization, but how does it propagate across trophic levels? We compiled 35 metacommunity time-series datasets spanning basal resources (e.g., phytoplankton) to top predators (e.g., piscivorous fish) from 384 freshwater sites across three contine...
Article
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Globalization has led to the introduction of thousands of alien species worldwide. With growing impacts by invasive species, understanding the invasion process remains critical for predicting adverse effects and informing efficient management. Theoretically, invasion dynamics have been assumed to follow an “invasion curve” (S-shaped curve of availa...
Article
Identifying the underlying ecological drivers of macroinvertebrate community assembly is fundamental to metacommunity ecology. Comparably, determining the influence of different drivers on beta diversity patterns can provide insight into processes governing community organization. Exploring the ecological drivers of metacommunity and beta diversity...
Article
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Nonperennial streams dominate global river networks and are increasing in occurrence across space and time. When surface flow ceases or the surface water dries, flow or moisture can be retained in the subsurface sediments of the hyporheic zone, supporting aquatic communities and ecosystem processes. However, hydrological and ecological definitions...
Article
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Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES), which cease flow and/or dry at some point, are the most abundant waterways on earth, and are found on every continent. They can support a diverse, and often abundant, terrestrial and semi-aquatic invertebrate (TSAI) fauna, which has been poorly explored due to its position at the fringe between aqua...
Article
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Hyporheic zones increase freshwater ecosystem resilience to hydrological extremes and global environmental change. However, current conceptualizations of hyporheic exchange, residence time distributions, and the associated biogeochemical cycling in streambed sediments do not always accurately explain the hydrological and biogeochemical complexity o...
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The cover image is based on the Viewpoint A global agenda for advancing freshwater biodiversity research by Alain Maasri et al., https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13931. Image Credit: Solvin Zankl. image
Article
The study of environmental DNA released by aquatic organisms in their habitat offers a fast, non‐invasive and sensitive approach to monitor their presence. Common eDNA sampling methods such as water filtration and DNA precipitation are time consuming, require difficult‐to‐handle equipment and partially integrate eDNA signals. To overcome these limi...
Preprint
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Understanding the capacity of ecological systems to withstand and recover from disturbances is a major challenge for ecological research in the context of environmental change. Disturbances have multi-scale effects: they can cause species extinctions locally and alter connectivity between habitat patches at the metacommunity level. Yet, our underst...
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River networks are among Earth’s most threatened hot-spots of biodiversity and provide key ecosystem services (e.g., supply drinking water and food, climate regulation) essential to sustaining human well-being. Climate change and increased human water use are causing more rivers and streams to dry, with devastating impacts on biodiversity and ecosy...
Article
Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) represent the majority of the global river network, support high biodiversity and provide multiple ecosystem services. However, they are being degraded at alarming rates, and it may be questioned whether current invertebrate-based biomonitoring protocols, which were designed for rivers and streams th...
Article
Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES), those watercourses that periodically cease to flow or dry, are the world’s most widespread type of river ecosystem. Our understanding of the natural hydrology and ecology of IRES has greatly improved, but their responses to extreme events such as drought remains a research frontier. In this review,...
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Rivers are dynamic ecosystems in which both human impacts and climate‐driven drying events are increasingly common. These anthropogenic and natural stressors interact to influence the biodiversity and functioning of river ecosystems. Disentangling ecological responses to these interacting stressors is necessary to guide management actions that supp...
Article
Rivers are generally considered critical habitats for biodiversity; however, this often ignores the fact that many rivers may run dry and support terrestrial as well as aquatic fauna. Here, we investigated the ecological value of intermittent rivers for terrestrial vertebrates by installing camera traps along rivers subject to varying dry periods i...
Article
Full-text available
Regional‐scale ecological processes, such as the spatial flows of material, energy, and organisms, are fundamental for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in river networks. Yet these processes remain largely overlooked in most river management practices and underlying policies. Here, we propose adoption of a meta‐system approach, wh...
Article
Full-text available
The current erosion of biodiversity is a major concern that threatens the ecological integrity of ecosystems and the ecosystem services they provide. Due to global change, an increasing proportion of river networks are drying and changes from perennial to non-perennial flow regimes represent dramatic ecological shifts with potentially irreversible...
Article
Full-text available
Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) – waterways in which flow ceases periodically or that dry completely – are found worldwide, and their frequency and extent are expected to increase in the future in response to global climate change and growing anthropogenic demand for fresh water. Repeated wet–dry cycles generate highly dynamic sett...
Article
As complex mosaics of lotic, lentic, and terrestrial habitats, intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) support high biodiversity. Despite their ecological importance, IRES are poorly represented in routine monitoring programs, but recent recognition of their considerable—and increasing—spatiotemporal extent is motivating efforts to better...
Article
Full-text available
Non-perennial streams are widespread, critical to ecosystems and society, and the subject of ongoing policy debate. Prior large-scale research on stream intermittency has been based on long-term averages, generally using annually aggregated data to characterize a highly variable process. As a result, it is not well understood if, how, or why the hy...
Chapter
Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (hereafter IRES) are waterways that temporarily cease to flow and/or dry up. They represent half the length of the global river network and are expanding in time and space in response to global change. The hydrological regimes of IRES are characterized by alternating flowing, non-flowing and dry phases, whi...
Preprint
Ecological processes occurring at the regional scale, such as the dispersal of organisms, and spatial flows of material and energy are fundamental for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in river networks, yet they remain largely overlooked in most river management practices and underlying policies. We propose a meta-system approach...
Chapter
This chapter explores intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES), dynamic ecosystems that are widespread throughout global river networks. Defined by flow cessation, IRES comprise mosaics of flowing, ponded and dry habitats that shift in space and time to support high biodiversity, including both aquatic and terrestrial species that contribut...

Citations

... Invasion dynamics can differ substantially between species and geographic regions Soto et al., 2023). In order to assess temporal change in the number of NICS populations, we analyzed changes in the number of occurrences (i.e. the number of invaded sites) over time. ...
... climatic conditions) or site-specific characteristics (availability of shelter, water current velocities, etc.) will help to explain: (i) long-term trends in crayfish invasions, (ii) species or region-specific differences, and/or (iii) environmental variables that can facilitate their success and future progression, including spread. To this end, we used a large European database of time series on macroinvertebrates collected from riverine freshwater ecosystems (Haase et al., under review;Haubrock et al., 2022), and extracted abundance data of NICS in Europe. We specifically asked: (1) if large-scale biomonitoring data can effectively describe the dynamics of crayfish based on presence and abundance data; and (2) if significant spatiotemporal trends in NICS populations can be inferred from these data. ...
... When previously perennial streams experience unprecedented drying events or when NFI streams are drying for longer because of artificial causes, ecological tipping points are crossed, leading to dramatic responses in which community composition is pushed to novel and irreversible states (Aspin et al. 2019, Crabot et al. 2020). These shifts occur because perennial stream biota typically lack adaptations to cope with drying and because dramatic top-down changes to food chains can occur when drying eliminates top predators (e.g., fish, odonates) or increases terrestrial predation, leading to disruption of trophic interactions and partial food web collapse (McHugh et al. 2015, Steward et al. 2022. Over time, however, stream communities exposed to long-term AFI may become increasingly similar to those in comparable NFI streams, with rates of compositional change depending on connectivity with regional NFI metapopulations that represent potential colonists (figure 2; Sarremejane et al. 2021). ...
... Hinlo et al. (2017) reviewed the filter type and efficiency and found cellulose nitrate and mixed cellulose filters performed the best. Other techniques, such as the passive collection of DNA by submerging filter membranes in the water column, are emerging as alternatives to the traditional and time-consuming active water filtering approach (Bessey et al. 2021;Verdier et al. 2021) and may be an attractive option to marine park managers with limited time, resources and expertise with eDNA biomonitoring. As discussed in Eble et al. (2020), eDNA is typically only present in trace quantities (<0.1 pg/ml -1 ; Turner et al. 2014) and degrades quickly (Maruyama et al. 2014); hence, care must be taken to rapidly process eDNA samples and preserve the resulting filtrate to minimise DNA degradation. ...
... The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in China, which accounts for 1/4 of its land area, stores a large number of water resources in the form of glaciers and snow, and is the birthplace of China's major rivers, such as the Yangtze, Yellow, Lantsang, and Tarim rivers [21]. It has a dense network of rivers with different river morphologies, and the spatial and temporal distribution of its rivers dynamically affects the downstream ecosystems and human activities [22][23][24]. Therefore, water monitoring on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is crucial for China's water security. ...
... However, global climatic changes have been modifying the rainfall regime in semiarid regions, altering the reproductive process of fish species. These climatic alterations favor the expansion of drying over time and space in naturally intermittent river regimes with prolonged dry phase (Larned et al., 2010;Datry et al., 2021). Temporal nestedness increased in naturally intermittent rivers as climatic aridity increased, showing that harsh environmental conditions associated with global changes may further reduce functional biodiversity at these sites even if they are already intermittent (Vorste et al., 2021). ...
... In Press;Vadas, 2000). For example, Crabot et al. (2021) showed that current French macroinvertebrate-based bioindicators were unable to detect organic contamination when annual-flow intermittence occurred 30-60% of the time. Munne et al. (2021) demonstrated that current MMIs could not be applied for much of the year in non-perennial Spanish rivers. ...
... This deficiency is particularly problematic in non-perennial streams because certain stream locations (e.g., bottlenecks) may have inordinately large effects on the entire networks. Moreover, many stream functions, particularly those involving biogeochemical processes, may asynchronous with hydrological connectivity (Stevenson and Sabater 2015;Jensen et al. 2019;Jiang et al, 2020;Niyogi et al., 2020;Shanafield et al., 2021;Sarremejane et al., 2022). Therefore, connectivity assessments based purely on non-perennial stream water presence / absence snapshots may not serve as adequate predictors for many stream processes. ...
... However, because stressors can directly and indirectly affect biota, and because taxa may be differentially affected by concurrent stressors, stressors may unintuitively interact, in synergistic, neutral, or antagonistic ways. Exploring the interactive effects of drying with other stressors on river biodiversity and ecological integrity represents a promising research avenue (Stubbington et al. 2022). ...
... Such within-river changes have often been examined in previous relevant studies (e.g., Martínez et al., 2013;Belmar et al., 2019;Arantes et al., 2022). However, Ruhi et al. (2018) suggested that the impact of dams on functional structure can extend longitudinally beyond the immediate tailwater, which can be examined from the metacommunity and meta-ecosystem perspectives (Cid et al., 2022). On the one hand, this may be because the effect of dams on sediment transportation and habitat conditions much further downstream may influence species functional traits at broader scales. ...