Tetsuya Matsubayashi's research while affiliated with Osaka University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
We demonstrate that intergovernmental transfers affect migration decisions. If local governments with large distributive allocations offer greater government employment, public works projects, and assistance to (small) businesses, they attract low-skilled or unemployed residents to move or stay in. We find that more allocations increase not only th...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The underreporting of suicides has been a serious global concern among scholars and policymakers. Several studies have sought to detect the prevalence of underreporting by examining whether suicide mortality rates are negatively correlated with those due to unknown intent or causes. This study adds to the literature by examining the potenti...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the dynamic nature of voting in modern elections with wide voting windows. Our stylized two-period model predicts that, if voters are not myopic, turnout in the current period tends to increase as the costs in the other period increase. The model also predicts that overall turnout does not always decrease even when the costs inc...
Article
How and why do major natural disasters affect suicide? This study revisits this question by focusing on the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE) in March 2011 as a historically important natural disaster. Using an event-study analysis, we assessed how the GEJE changed the suicide rates in the regions affected by it and whether its effect persisted, a...
Article
Objectives The aim of the study was to examine COVID-19 preventive behaviours among individuals with mental health problems. Study design This is a pooled cross-sectional study. Methods Online survey data were analysed from 2000 Japanese adults collected in April and May 2020. Information was obtained on 13 COVID-19 preventive behaviours and anxi...
Article
In the era of growing income inequality around the world, it remains inconclusive how higher income inequality affects income bias in turnout (i.e., high-income citizens vote more likely than low-income citizens). Using large-scale cross-national survey data, we show that (1) strong income bias in turnout exists in many parts of the world, (2) high...
Preprint
Full-text available
Backgrounds Austerity has been shown to have an adverse influence on people’s mental health and suicide rates. Most existing studies have focused on the governments’ reactions to a single event, for example, the Great Recession of 2008.Methods This study focused on significant changes in fiscal policy between 2001 and 2014 in Japan. The size of exp...
Preprint
Backgrounds: Austerity has been shown to have an adverse influence on people’s mental health and suicide rates. Most existing studies have focused on the governments’ reactions to a single event, for example, the Great Recession of 2008. Methods: This study focused on significant changes in fiscal policy between 2001 and 2014 in Japan. The size of...
Article
What are the electoral and political consequences of longer life spans around the world? Global life expectancy at birth has increased by 5.5 years to 72 between 2000 and 2016 (World Health Organization, 2019), suggesting that more people are living longer in many parts of the world. Furthermore, more seniors maintain their physical and mental heal...

Citations

... According to the nationwide studies, suicide rates in women increased for several months immediately after the GEJE [5,6] whereas, conversely, the rates in men showed a large decline for several months following the GEJE [5,6], and suicide by men aged 40-64 years and 65 years and over exhibited a large decline in the years following the GEJE, a decline which attenuated over time [7]. In Tochigi Prefecture, located in the south of Fukushima Prefecture, suicide rates in 2011 increased and peaked in May, which contrasted with the years 2008, 2009, and 2010, which saw rates peak in March [8]. ...
... Along the same line, the findings showed that participants with low education, less wore masks and fewer canceled personal/social activities, and more had visitors in their residences (23). Also, education levels were positively associated with preventive behaviors regarding COVID-19, which is consistent with previous studies (24)(25)(26)(27)(28)(29)(30)(31). ...
... In doing so, our paper contributes to a growing literature examining the implications of vote buying-and political clientelism more broadly-for public goods and redistributive policy. While a large literature engages with questions of which voters are targeted by votebuying campaigns (Carreras & İrepoğlu, 2013;Jensen & Justesen, 2014;Matsubayashi & Sakaiya, 2021;Stokes et al., 2013) and how vote buying and other forms of electoral clientelism are enforced in the shadow of the secret ballot (Guardado & Wantchekon, 2018;Larreguy et al., 2016;Nichter, 2008;Stokes, 2005), we know much less about how vote buying affects voter preferences for programmatic redistribution and public goods provision. We contribute to filling this gap by providing evidence from a laboratory experiment designed to examine how vote buying by political candidates causally affects voter support for programmatic redistribution-and how this effect is moderated by shifting the electoral environment from open to secret ballots. ...