Tessa Steiniche's research while affiliated with Indiana University Bloomington and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Sixty years ago, Rachel Carson published her book Silent Spring, which focused the world's attention on the dangers of pesticides. Since that time human impacts on the environment have accelerated and this has included reshaping the chemical landscape. Here we evaluate the severity of exposure of tropical terrestrial mammals to pesticides, pharmace...
Article
The habitats of wild primates are increasingly threatened by surrounding anthropogenic pressures, but little is known about primate exposure to frequently used chemicals. We applied a novel method to simultaneously measure 21 legacy pesticides (OCPs), 29 current use pesticides (CUPs), 47 halogenated flame retardants (HFRs), and 19 organophosphate f...
Article
Gut microbial communities communicate bidirectionally with the brain through endocrine, immune, and neural signaling, influencing the physiology and behavior of hosts. The emerging field of microbial endocrinology offers innovative perspectives and methods to analyze host-microbe relationships with relevance to primate ecology, evolution, and conse...
Article
Protected areas have developed alongside intensive changes in land use and human settlements in the neighboring landscape. Here, we investigated the occurrence of 21 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), 14 current use pesticides (CUPs), 47 halogenated flame retardants (HFRs), and 19 organophosphate esters (OPEs) in air around Las Cruces (LC) and La Se...

Citations

... Anthropogenic disturbance (e.g. forest fragmentation, poaching) and associated stress (McLennan et al., 2019), exposure to human and domestic animal pathogens directly or through the environment (Goldberg et al., 2008), and exposure to environmental toxins (Wang, Steiniche, et al., 2020) may explain differences between Kanyawara and Ngogo viromes. ...
... The preference for camera trap studies to be conducted in forests may be because the habitat is visually restrictive and difficult to sample using other observation methods (McCallum, 2013;Ferreras et al., 2018). Camera trapping in forests also allows rare and elusive species to be observed, with direct and aerial observation methods not being a viable option (McCallum, 2013;Ehlers Smith et al., 2018Rich et al., 2020;Zungu et al., 2020a;Sosibo et al., 2022). ...
... The gut microbiome of vertebrates is shaped by a combination of intrinsic (e.g., host genetics) and extrinsic (e.g., ecology, climate) factors which determine the structure, stability, and dynamics of bacterial communities, including diversity and function (Douglas, 2018). The host's physiological stress response, i.e., physiological reactions to noxious or threatening physical or psychological stimuli (Romero, 2004;Reeder and Kramer, 2005), has been recognized as a contributing factor of microbiome change, mediated in part by interactions within the gut-brain axis (Foster et al., 2017;Benavidez et al., 2019). That is, the complex communication between the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system modulates microbiome responses to stressful stimuli (Foster and McVey Neufeld, 2013;Moloney et al., 2014). ...
... The region of San Vito de Coto Brus is composed mainly of cattle pastures, coffee plantations and forest patches usually along riparian zones (Daily et al., 2003;Santos-Barrera et al., 2008;Mendenhall et al., 2016). Human activity in this region is mainly focused on small-scale livestock production and subsistence agriculture (Quesada-Román, 2013;Wang et al., 2019). Air sampling at the Las Cruces Research Station showed important concentrations of different pesticide groups associated to malformations in other animal groups, mainly mammals (Wang et al., 2019). ...