Terry L. Cucci's research while affiliated with Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences and other places

Publications (39)

Article
Flow cytometry advanced during the decade of the 1980s. Portability, as well as technological advances in the instruments, now allows the simultaneous study of chemical and biological parameters within intact cells both at sea and in the laboratory. Here we report on photoadaptation, fluorescence quenching, metabolic activity, and photosynthetic pr...
Article
The entire microbial plankton community was quantified on a weekly basis April through June of 2000 in Quantuck Bay as part of an ongoing study to identify factors contributing to the initiation of blooms of Aureococcus anophagefferens (brown tide) in Long Island, NY bays. We used flow cytometry, imaging cytometry, fluorescent antibody cell counts,...
Article
Forward-angle light scatter, as measured by flow cytometry, can be used to estimate the size spectra of cell assemblages from natural waters. The refractive index of water samples from aquatic environments can differ because of a variety of factors such as dissolved organic content, aldehyde preservative, sample salinity, and temperature. In flow c...
Article
Full-text available
The respiratory activity of marine bacteria is an important indication of the ecological functioning of these organisms in marine ecosystems. The redox dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) is reduced intracellularly in respiring cells to an insoluble, fluorescent precipitate. This product is detectable and quantifiable by flow cytomet...
Article
Full-text available
Light scattering properties of biogenic CaCO3 particles [particulate inorganic carbon (PIC)] were determined on cultured calcifying algae and field-derived CaCO3 particles. The particles were separated from particulate organic carbon (POC) with a flow cytometer, volume-scattering functions were measured with a laser light-scattering photometer, and...
Article
Benthic particle feeders are exposed to a food supply varying in both quantity and quality. Previous studies have shown that bivalve molluscs deal with such fluctuating particle regimes in a variety of ways, including adjustments in pumping and ingestion rates, and selective rejection of non-nutritive particles as pseudofeces. The actual site of pa...
Article
Bivalve molluscs form dense populations that exert profound effects on the particle loads and phytoplankton composition of coastal waters. It has long been known that bivalves can select among different particle types, including selecting against those of poor nutritional value, but because of difficulties in observing particle transport processes...
Article
Two new fluorochromes, PicoGreen® and SYTOX Green™ stain (Molecular Probes, Inc.), are useful with flow cytometry for quantitative detection of cellular DNA in a variety of marina phytoplankton. The basic instrument configuration of modern low-power flow cytometers (15 mW, 488 nm excitation) is sensitive enough to detect the DNA signal in nearly al...
Article
Full-text available
Juvenile scallops (<2 mm shell height) of three species (Placopecten magellanicus, Patinopecten yessoensis, Argopecten irradians) were fed mixed, unialgal cultures. Scallops were fed a total of six algal clones simultaneously and clearance rates were monitored using flow cytometric techniques. In another experiment, scallops were presented with nat...
Article
Accurate measurements of bacterial biomass in the ocean are needed for modeling marine microbial food webs and global biogeochemical cycling. We present direct evidence that previous estimates of heterotrophic bacteria biomass in the oligotrophic ocean are confounded by the presence of the abundant photosynthetic procaryote, Prochlorococcus. The ch...
Article
Using fluorescently-labeled bacteria and detection by flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate inducible mixotrophy in a marine photosynthetic flagellate, Ochromonas sp. (class Chrysophyceae). Phagotrophic uptake of bacteria increases under conditions of low or limiting light and nutrients, but deceases in periods of prolonged...
Article
Laboratory experiments were performed with the prymnesiophyte Emiliania huxleyi (Lohm.) Hay and Mohler, strain 88E, to quantify calcification per cell, coccolith detachment, and effects of coccolith production on optical scattering of individual cells. 14C incorporation into attached and detached coccoliths was measured using a bulk filtration tech...
Article
Full-text available
The clearance rate of natural planktonic assemblages was measured for the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (L.) and a co-occurring fouling community from mussel rope cultures using flow cytometry. Blue mussels had significantly higher clearance rates for all particle types and size classes. In addition, blue mussels showed selective feeding in favor of s...
Article
Particles from both natural populations and culture mixtures are categorized into microautotroph and detritus/microheterotroph components based on size and chlorophyll autofluorescence. Subcomponents ofmicroautotroph pigment groups are possible by the addition of phycoerythrin autofluorescence measurements. Subcomponents of microautotrophs as "live...
Article
Phytoplankton can, through their autofluorescent characteristics, be thought of as tracer particles in much the same way as fluorescent microspheres when used in particle uptake experiments. Flow cytometric techniques can be used to differentiate phytoplankton from other suspended particles by the two primary autofluorescing photosynthetic pigments...
Article
A theoretical framework for interpreting flow cytometric histograms from homogeneous phytoplankton populations was developed in part I of this series of articles and applied to chlorophyll fluorescence histograms from clonal cultures in part II. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of this framework to the analysis of cell volume distribut...
Article
Flow cytometry and sorting are now an important technology in aquatic research. Simultaneous measurements of individual particle cell size, fluorescence, and light scatter properties are directly applicable to current topics in aquatic research. Flow sorting may be employed to obtain subsets of cells for analysis by conventional methods. The manner...
Article
Individual particle analysis using a flow cytometer (FCM) was made on natural phytoplankton communities in oligotrophic waters. Our objective was to develop an assay to yield information on the nutrient history of individual cells using FCM. Results from nutrient assays showed that both biovolume and total red fluorescence are affected by the nutri...
Article
Centrifugal elutriation is a technique for separating particles on the basis of their sedimentation velocity, an expression of size, shape, and specific gravity. Unialgal cultures, mixtures of two phytoplankton cultures, and natural seawater samples were elutriated to determine the feasibility of this technique for collecting fractions of different...
Article
This article is in Free Access Publication and may be downloaded using the “Download Full Text PDF” link at right. © 1989, by the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.
Article
Full-text available
Bulk fluorescence measurements have been popular in algal culture studies and in oceanographic and limnological applications. Usually, fluorescence is interpreted as an indicator of chlorophyll concentration or phytoplankton biomass, but sometimes measurements of fluorescence can be related to physiological properties of phytoplankton, such as resp...
Chapter
In aquatic sciences, traditional methods which measure biological parameters of particulates such as biomass, carbon fixation, nitrogen assimilation, etc., have relied on bulk analyses resulting in mean values for heterogeneous populations. Information on the distribution of individual cells or particles about the mean are lacking. Certainly, under...
Article
We assessed damage done to especially delicate marine phytoplankton cells by passage through a Coulter Epics V flow cytometer. The cells did not distort or lyse after exposure to fluidics or to laser light to 1,000 mW. The cells did sustain damage evidenced by temporary growth rate depressions. The four clones tested eventually resumed control grow...
Article
A series of experiments was carried out to assess the effects of the toxic dinoflagellate Protogonyaulax tamarensis on shell-valve activity, rates of particle clearance, preingestive, and postingestive particle selection in seven species of bivalve molluses from three geographic localities: Maine, Rhode Island, and Spain. The responses observed wer...
Article
Ammonium regeneration by micro- (35–153 μm) and macrozooplankton (> 153 μm) was determined in the Gulf of Maine by measuring the activity of the excretory enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in various size fractions. GDH maxima were generally observed to correspond to the depth of the chlorophyll maximum as previously reported in the Gulf of Mexi...
Article
The planktonic ciliate, Balanion sp., feeds preferentially on certain dinoflagellates when confronted with mixtures of microalgae. The preferred prey are species which support its fastest growth (≈ 3 div./day at 15°C). At high food densities, Balanion can grow as rapidly in algal mixtures which contain its preferred prey as its corresponding monocu...
Chapter
Oceanographers have always wrestled with the time-space dilemma. The enormity of the oceans and the manifold physical, chemical and biological processes compound to make ‘sampling’ in the oceanic realm an omni-present problem. For the most part, the oceanographer has been wed to the research vessel. This has heavily restricted and frequently determ...
Article
1.1. The distribution of the enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase, and glutaminase among tissues of three decapod species supports a catabolic nitrogen pathway involving a glutamine detoxification mechanism.2.2. Low levels of enzyme activity in the hepatopancreas suggest a diminished role of this organ in providing excretory nitrog...
Article
Changes in cellular chlorophyll content, cell volume, and light scatter of a New England red tide dinoflagellate, Protogonyaulax tamarensis var. excavata (clone GT-429), cultured in various light regimes are reported. Individual cells were analyzed, using flow cytometry and compared to traditional bulk measurements. Compared to high photon flux den...
Article
Full-text available
Measurements were made of the clearance rate of six bivalve species each in the presence of mixed cell suspensions of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum (Pavillard) Schiller (clone Exuv), the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin (clone Phaeo), and the cryptomonad flagellate Chroomonas salina (Wislouch) Butcher (clone 3C). Use of flow cytome...
Article
The vertical disthbution of chlorophyll, zooplankton and physical structure were measured using a pumping system and CTD on two cruises in the Gulf of Maine during June and September 1982. The vertical distribution of chlorophyll was closely related to the density structure of the water column. In waters with a pronounced pycnocline subsurface chio...

Citations

... Toxin composition in bivalves often differs from the PST profile of the toxic cells ingested, due to biotransformation of toxins, which differs accord­ ing to the bivalve species (reviewed in Bricelj and Shumway, 1998). Some bivalve species, such as M. arenaria, C. gigas, or M. mercenaria (Martin et al., 1990b;Bricelj et al., 1991Bricelj et al., , 1996Oshima et al., 1987), show a lower capacity to biotransform PST than do S. giganteus, P. staminea, or S. solidissima (Beitler, 1992;Sullivan et al., 1983aSullivan et al., , 1983bBricelj and Shumway, 1998). These changes in toxin profiles are the results of potential selective reten­ tion, elimination, or biotransformation of PST, such as reduction, hydrolysis, or enzymatic con­ version (see Bricelj and Shumway, 1998). ...
... 50% in CR compared to the Control diet. Under live phytoplankton diets, clearance rate in bivalves have shown higher values compared to inert diets such as Kelp [81], non-fluorescent particles as sediment [82] and detritous [83]. In fact Ward et al. [84] suggested that bivalves filtration activity could be estimulated by the metabolites released by live phytoplankton. ...
... For examdepths each night may result either from the full redis-ple, preferential loss of cells with higher caloric values tribution of different cell types at both depths or from a vertical gradient of sub-population variances associated with nearly identical sub-population averages. Bulk measurements a s reported here that provide only cellular averages need supplemental cell 7-3500 specific measurements from epifluorescence 2 microscopy (Kohen & Hirschberg 1989) or 2 3000 -C flow cytometry (Yentsch et al. 1986) Cullen (1985) provided evidence based on Heterocapsa niei that dinoflagellate behavior and physiology combine to enhance growth. Near-surface carbohydrate synthesis during the day supports nitrogen uptake and assimilation deeper in the water column at night for protein synthesis. ...
... Various studies have described oysters and clams as being highly sensitive to PST, with prominent decreases in their feeding activity and growth rate (Bricelj et al., 1996;Lassus et al., 2004;Navarro et al., 2014Navarro et al., , 2016. For example, the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Bardouil et al., 1996), and the clam Ruditapes philippinarum (Li et al., 2002), responded with a strong reduction in feeding activity when exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. ...
... There is therefore a growing concern about the effects of HABs upon shellfish resources, both in terms of seafood safety and the sustainability of shellfish industries (Tan and Ransangan 2015). HABs species mainly Prorocentrum minimum (Sellner et al. 1995), Heterocapsa circularisquama (Matsuyama et al. 1996) and Aureococcus anophagefferens (Bricelj and MacQuarrie 2007) have been associated with climate change and mass mortality episodes in bivalves. ...
... responses) that vary with algal flux (J) provided by the product of the velocity (u) and the concentration of algal particles (C; J = u × C; vanden Byllaardt & Ackerman, 2014). Results from a variety of techniques indicate that bivalves are able to discriminate among particle characteristics including (1) size and shape (Dionisio Pires et al., 2004;Lesser et al., 1991;Newel et al., 1989;Shumway et al., 1985); (2) nutritional value (Atkinson et al., 2011;Basen et al., 2011;Gatenby et al., 1997); and (3) cell surface properties (Jing et al., 2011;Pales Espinosa et al., 2010;Yahel et al., 2009). There has been much progress made on the subject of particle processing, yet much remains to be understood about the underlying mechanism involved (Rosa et al., 2013;Ward & Shumway, 2004). ...
... The FDA assay appeared useful for the study of all 30 dinoflagellate clones surveyed. The esterases that make the FDA assay possible, turn over in a time frame of several hours (Yentsch, 1988. Berglund et al. (1988) describe an accepted procedure for cytotoxicity testing. ...
... We suggest that M. trossulus can be more selective (in terms of particle size etc.) when it feeds on matter derived from macrophytes, as both the particle size and quality has been reported to affect its feeding activity (e.g. Newell et al., 1989;Defossez and Hawkins, 1997). ...
... Therefore, faster and more automated methods that allow the achievement of good quantification and accuracy would be useful. A suitable alternative for estimating ingestion rates could be the use of flow cytometry (FC) to detect fluorescent-labeled prey ingested by protists (Keller et al., 1994). FC, which can quantify thousands of cells in a few minutes (Shapiro, 1995), has been routinely used in microbial ecology to estimate the abundance of several distinct types of aquatic organisms (Gasol and del Giorgio 2000;Sarmento et al., 2008;Schiaffino et al., 2013). ...
... Aggregates can adsorb and desorb dissolved organic matter (DOM;BAIER et al., 1989;WEISS et al., 1996), thus leading to a micro-spatial accumulation of nutrients (PEDROS-ALIO and BROCK, 1983). Aggregates bind and concentrate cations and anions (COSTERTON et al. 1995;DECHO and LOPEZ, 1993) and, therefore, higher concentrations of these components occur on particles than in the pelagic environment and also leading to a lower toxicity in the surrounding water (KARBE and WESTENDORF, 1996). ...