Teresa J. Frink's research while affiliated with Chadron State College and other places

Publications (5)

Article
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Habitat and diet preferences are often considered major aspects of niches differentiation among species; however, partitioning of habitat and resource use temporally is often overlooked in modeling coexistence. The plasticity of temporal activity patterns of individuals may influence the species' response to selective forces and long‐term persisten...
Article
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Context Niche theory is frequently used as a framework to integrate environmental variables and species interactions to describe species geographic distribution. Yet, the scale at which species respond to the environment and other species is rarely considered in species distribution modeling. Here we examined the effect of spatial scale on species...
Article
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Ungulate species have consistently been a major focus of reintroductions to their native ranges. Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) are an ecologically sensitive species, and have experienced population declines throughout their historic range; bighorn sheep inhabited the Black Hills region of South Dakota but were extirpated from the area due to anth...
Article
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Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were once extirpated from the Black Hills region of South Dakota, USA, mirroring declining populations throughout North America. Since the 1960s, several reintroductions have occurred in the Black Hills to reestablish populations with varying success. We translocated 26 bighorn sheep from Alberta, Canada to the Black...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT—Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) historically inhabited the Black Hills region of South Dakota, but the species was extirpated from the area in the early 1900s concurrent with declines in population throughout their entire North American range. Translocation is a common management tool allowing for accelerated colonization of historic Bigho...

Citations

... Despite substantial advancements within the last 15 years, up to 45% of recent translocation projects failed or were considered a "partial success" only (Soorae, 2011(Soorae, , 2013(Soorae, , 2016. One of the reasons for failure is that animals typically exhibit extensive movements following their release because of the need to explore their new habitat (Bleisch et al., 2017;Moehrenschlager & Macdonald, 2003;Werdel et al., 2021). These large movements are energetically costly (Bonte et al., 2012) and increase exposure to predators (Leech et al., 2017;Yoder et al., 2004) or the risk of accidents such as vehicle collisions (Spinola et al., 2008), ultimately leading to greater mortalities. ...
... However, the benefits of translocation must always be weighed against the risk of disease. New translocations can increase densities and foray behavior due to competition for forage and mating opportunities, resulting in more connect habitat patches, potentially facilitating disease transmission (Werdel et al. 2020). Our models of site fidelity and habitat use, as well as the predictive maps of habitat use, will help inform those management decisions. ...
... Regardless of management goals, practitioners should rigorously evaluate post-translocation metrics (e.g. survival, space use) to assess the effectiveness of their efforts (Jachowski et al. 2016, Lehrer et al. 2016, Werdel et al. 2018, Berger-Tal et al. 2019. ...