Tania King's research while affiliated with National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and other places

Publications (11)

Article
Full-text available
Located at the crossroads between Africa, Europe and Asia, the Southern Caucasus is a prime location to study occupations by H. heidelbergensis, H. neanderthalensis and anatomically modern humans. Azokh Cave is an important site for the understanding of human evolution in its archaeological, palaeontological, environmental and ecological context. T...
Chapter
Correction to: Chapter 7 in: J. Cascalheira, A. Picin (eds.), Short‐Term Occupations in Paleolithic Archaeology, Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-27403-0_7
Chapter
The Caucasus is an important intercontinental passageway for fauna and hominin dispersal from Africa to Eurasia. Numerous Pleistocene sites emphasise the importance of this region for the study of human evolution and hominin ‘Out of Africa’ dispersals. The Azokh 1 site in the Southern Caucasus provides a stratigraphic sequence, the renewed excavati...
Chapter
The Caucasus is an important intercontinental passageway for fauna and hominin dispersal from Africa to Eurasia. Numerous Pleistocene sites emphasize the importance of this region for the study of human evolution and hominin “Out of Africa” dispersals. The Azokh 1 site in the Southern Caucasus provides a stratigraphic sequence, the renewed excavati...
Article
Chemical weathering of archaeological material is well known; however, while there have been a number of experimental studies demonstrating different types and degrees of chemical alteration on faunal remains, little attention has been paid to stone tools, and the few studies that exist relate mainly to siliceous materials and water-induced chemica...
Chapter
Full-text available
Azokh Cave (also known as Azikh or Azykh) contains Pleistocene and Holocene stratified sediment infill. The site was discovered by M. Huseinov (also named Guseinov by other authors) who led the previous phase of excavations. The geographic location of the site is at an important migratory route between Africa and Eurasia. The site has yielded Middl...
Chapter
Hominin remains have been discovered at Azokh Cave from three different entrance passageways during the early and present phases of excavation. Evidence for three different species of hominin – Homo heidelbergensis, Homo neanderthalensis, and Homo sapiens – has been found at Azokh Cave. A fragment of hominin mandible was found in Azokh 1 in 1968. P...
Chapter
The fauna and flora from Azokh 1 are analyzed to provide evidence on past and present environments. The large mammal fauna was accumulated by carnivore and human agents, and it is dominated by woodland species. The small mammals, amphibians and reptiles were accumulated mainly by avian predators, barn owls and eagle owls which hunt over open areas,...
Article
Full-text available
Azokh Cave is a Middle Pleistocene to Holocene site located in Nagorno Karabagh (Lesser Caucasus). The main entrance, Azokh 1, is a large cave that has two geological sequences (lower and upper) with nine geo-archaeological units of which only the upper ones (Units I to V) have a significant archaeological record. The faunal remains and lithic arte...
Article
Azokh Cave is located in the southern Caucasus and contains a Pleistocene and Holocene sediment infill. The site is significant due to its geographic location at an important migratory route-way between the African subcontinent and Eurasia, and the recovery of Middle Pleistocene hominid remains in the sedimentary sequence during a previous phase of...

Citations

... Obsidian artefacts are rare in the MP assemblages at Azokh-1 and primarily occur as end-products, retouched tools, and chips. These artefacts were likely made on material originating ~ 50-200 linear km to the west-northwest in the Armenian volcanic highlands (Asryan et al., 2014(Asryan et al., , 2020Fernández-Jalvo et al., 2016;Murray et al., 2010). ...
... The Armenian Highlands and the Caucasus are together a hotspot of biodiversity, hosting a large number of endemic plant and animal species, due to the region's role as a glacial refugium (Vereshchagin, 1967;Volodicheva, 2002;Zazanashvili et al., 2004). In addition, the diversity and abundance of other natural resources, namely sources of high-quality lithic raw materials (obsidian, dacite, chert, jasper, limestone, quartzite, etc.), the richness of freshwater sources, as well as the mosaic of contiguous, diverse ecozones, attracted Palaeolithic populations Asryan et al., 2014Asryan et al., , 2020Doronicheva and Shackley, 2014;Doronicheva et al., 2013Doronicheva et al., , 2020Egeland et al., 2016;Frahm et al., 2014a,b;Gasparyan, 2010;Shchelinskiy, 2007). The favourable climate and rich natural resources of both geographic units have helped define their pivotal role as an important destination and thoroughfare for hominin populations throughout the Palaeolithic and, indeed, into historic times. ...
... The test-trench excavation carried out has so far shown that this sequence does not contain archaeological material. The exact age of Sediment Sequence 1 remains unclear, although previous palaeomagnetic results suggest that it is probably older than the upper units and may be of Early Pleistocene age. 2. Sediment Sequence 2: contains Units V to I. The new excavations focus on these units; all of them present an archaeological record, with an age range from the Middle to the Late Pleistocene (MIS 5) (Units V to II), with some Holocene sediments at the top (Unit I) (Fernández-Jalvo et al. 2010, 2016bMurray et al. 2010;Asryan 2015;Asryan et al. 2017Asryan et al. , 2020. ...
... The so-called Trans-Caucasian corridor is one of the areas that enabled hominin dispersal out of the Levant and into the rest of Eurasia during the Pleistocene ( Bar-Yosef and Belfer-Cohen, 2001;Fernández Jalvo et al., 2010). Early paleoanthropological evidence associated with this route of dispersal includes the Dmanisi (Georgia) fossil hominins 1.8 million years ago (Gabunia et al., 2000) and the easternmost occurrence of Homo heidelbergensis at Azokh Cave (Nagorno-Karabagh) between 400-250 thousand years before present (ka BP) (Kasimova, 2001;King et al., 2016). Later, between Marine Isotope Stage 5-3 (ca. ...
... These results are in agreement with previous taphonomic work published by Andrews et al. (2016), where the molars and incisors showed similar levels of digestion. The digestion levels are mainly light or moderate, indicating that the sample was probably accumulated by Tyto alba, which produces low degrees of digestion except at its nest site . ...
... One such karst cave occurs at Karin Tak in the SE-most Lesser Caucasus (NE Armenian Highland: Fig. 1) where a Late Pleistocene to Holocene sediment infill has been found to contain well-preserved hominin remains and obsidian tools together with faunal and floral remnants (Stafford and Yepiskoposyan, 2015;Antonosyan, et al., 2019). The importance of the cave derives from the fact that it is located on an established migration route used by hominins (e.g., Adler et al., 2014;Fernández-Jalvo et al., 2016). During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), corresponding to MIS 2 (Marine Isotope Stage) (26,500−19,000 calibrated years before present (cal. ...
... The Armenian Highlands and the Caucasus are together a hotspot of biodiversity, hosting a large number of endemic plant and animal species, due to the region's role as a glacial refugium (Vereshchagin, 1967;Volodicheva, 2002;Zazanashvili et al., 2004). In addition, the diversity and abundance of other natural resources, namely sources of high-quality lithic raw materials (obsidian, dacite, chert, jasper, limestone, quartzite, etc.), the richness of freshwater sources, as well as the mosaic of contiguous, diverse ecozones, attracted Palaeolithic populations Asryan et al., 2014Asryan et al., , 2020Doronicheva and Shackley, 2014;Doronicheva et al., 2013Doronicheva et al., , 2020Egeland et al., 2016;Frahm et al., 2014a,b;Gasparyan, 2010;Shchelinskiy, 2007). The favourable climate and rich natural resources of both geographic units have helped define their pivotal role as an important destination and thoroughfare for hominin populations throughout the Palaeolithic and, indeed, into historic times. ...
... In Azokh 1, nine stratigraphic units are identified, currently separated into two sediment sequences, which can no longer be readily correlated due to the removal of all the intervening stratigraphy ( Fig. 2) (Murray et al. 2010(Murray et al. , 2016: ...