Tammy Buonasera's research while affiliated with University of California, Davis and other places

Publications (17)

Book
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This context and research design expands on traditional archaeological approaches to explore potential eligibility of features with and without associated deposits. The plan is part of an ongoing series of thematic archaeological research designs developed by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to aid in the treatment of specific...
Article
Biomolecular sex estimation promises to fill a major gap in the bioarchaeological record by providing estimates of biological sex for skeletal remains with degraded or ambiguous osteological sex-specific markers. Genomic and proteomic sex estimation, like all analytical methods, have limitations and require frameworks to address the problems of low...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual division of labor with females as gatherers and males as hunters is a major empirical regularity of hunter-gatherer ethnography, suggesting an ancestral behavioral pattern. We present an archeological discovery and meta-analysis that challenge the man-the-hunter hypothesis. Excavations at the Andean highland site of Wilamaya Patjxa reveal a...
Article
Remains of animal fuel and driftwood fires are evident in Birnirk and Thule sites of northwestern Alaska (AD 11th-14th century). To better understand these fires, a robust experimental protocol was designed to study the effects of multi-fuel fires, in particular, the addition of fat to woody fuels. In Arctic regions, permafrost and climate conditio...
Article
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Sex estimation of skeletons is fundamental to many archaeological studies. Currently, three approaches are available to estimate sex–osteology, genomics, or proteomics, but little is known about the relative reliability of these methods in applied settings. We present matching osteological, shotgun-genomic, and proteomic data to estimate the sex of...
Conference Paper
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SESSION 13: Learning to Replicate Past Practices, Replicating Past Practices to Learn: Experimental Approaches and New Techniques in Alaskan Archaeology Our oral presentation introduces a new scientific article (under review) about 55 fire experiments conducted under controlled laboratory conditions in France, and under outdoor conditions in an A...
Article
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Molecular and isotopic analysis of sediments from archaeological combustion features is a relatively new area of study. Applications can inform us about ancient pyro-technologies and patterns of animal exploitation in a wide range of human contexts, but may be particularly informative with regard to ancient hunter-gatherers. Our analyses of sedimen...
Conference Paper
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We examine age of weaning and childhood diet at a Middle Period site in central California, CA-SOL-11, near Suisun Marsh. Stable isotope analyses of serial samples of permanent first molars record information about the diet of an individual when they were between 0 and 9.5 years of age. Our results show that females were breastfed, on average, slig...
Conference Paper
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Marine VANLANDEGHEM, Claire ALIX, LAUREN NORMAN, TAMMY BUONASERA In northwestern Alaska, burned activity areas with horizons of carbonized organic remains and sand layers cemented with sea mammal fat are often found outside of Birnirk and Thule semi-subterranean house features. In this paper, we address the question of using animal products (such...
Article
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The late adoption of pottery technology in the North American Arctic between 2,500 and 2,800 years ago coincides with the development of a specialized maritime economy. Arctic pottery technologies present an excellent case study for examining possible correlations between hunter-gatherer pottery and aquatic resource use. Review of the timing and di...
Article
Full-text available
Shiny grooved rock surfaces found in archaeological sites are common across west Texas and the Southwest (U.S.). In most cases they are cursorily described, with very little in terms of detailed characterization and analysis. Interpretations regarding the meaning of the grooves include fertility rituals and functional use (e.g., bone tool or axe po...
Article
[Research Article]Bedrock features represent various economic, social, and symbolic aspects of past societies, but have historically received little study, particularly in North America. Fortunately, new techniques for analyzing spatial configurations, use-wear, and organic residues are beginning to unlock more of the interpretive potential of thes...
Article
It is often assumed that use-surfaces on informal or expedient milling tools were formed strictly through use. Informal or expedient milling tools lack clear evidence of exterior shaping and are often associated with short-term occupations or temporary, task-specific sites. Here, a simple model of technological intensification outlined in Bettinger...
Article
The archaeological record of central California contains a rich variety of ground stone milling tools—from highly expedient cobble tools to large ornate mortars and finely finished pestles more than half a meter in length. Historical trends in research objectives, along with assumptions about the entirely mundane character of ground stone tools, ha...
Article
Analysis of absorbed organic molecules in groundstone could provide a valuable means to study resource use and processing in antiquity. The following study analyzed extracts from the surfaces of several central California milling tools to assess whether organic residues remained from prehistoric resource processing. It also sought to determine whic...
Article
Although lipid analysis of archaeological residues has been utilized for almost three decades, it has rarely been applied to archaeological materials other than pottery. A 2001 study used lipid analysis of burned rocks (sandstone) and ground stone tools to interpret subsistence change at a south Texas site (M.J. Quigg, M.E. Malainey, R. Przybylski,...

Citations

... 14 ), probocideans (Notiomastodon platensis), and rodents (Myocastor coypus 355 ). Although there are concerns that the method could produce inaccurate results due to the presence of low frequency of AMELY deletion variants in some populations, 356,357 sexing using amelogenin is generally a robust technique, and it is an important biomolecular tool in cases where mophological sex determination is not possible, especially for incomplete skeletons and juveniles, 94 or when ancient DNA analysis is unsuccessful or infeasible. 354 ...
Reference: Paleoproteomics
... Eerkens 2005; Skibo, Malainey, and Drake 2009), groundstone assemblages, and milling surfaces (e.g. Buonasera 2005Buonasera , 2007Buonasera , 2016 related to acorn processing. The technique employed for the Upper Great Lakes, based on fatty acid composition, was developed by Malainey (2007;Malainey et al. 1999aMalainey et al. , 1999bMalainey et al. , 1999c, who has successfully refined the identification criteria for over 130 indigenous plants based on fatty acid composition, as well as the effects of cooking and degradation (Malainey, Przybylski, and Sherriff 1999b). ...
... Hunter-gatherers show a clear sexual division of labor between hunting and gathering, often associated with mating strategies, 22,23 although recent archaeological evidence from the Late Pleistocene suggested that females may also have participated in early big-game hunting 9,000 years ago. 24 In agricultural and pastoral societies, the division of tasks between sexes is more variable. Based on visual scans, hunter-gatherers in the Philippines showed roughly equal amounts of leisure time between men and women, but the balance became more detrimental to women as ''off-camp'' work increased. ...
... Oak and pine are more likely to be underrepresented in assemblages, as they are less resistant to pressure than, for instance, birch (Bishop et al., 2015: 64), and wood that was already decaying when burned is also less well preserved. Experiments emphasize the complexity of the taphonomic processes involved, given the diversity of factors ranging from the selection of the fuel to post-depositional processes (Théry-Parisot et al., 2010: 150), while other experiments show that the higher the temperature of the fire, the less charcoal it produces (Vanlandeghem et al., 2020). ...
... Likewise, the comparison of proteomic and genomic methods has shown that in some cases where aDNA is less well preserved, sex determination using amelogenin peptide analysis can yield reliable results [49,50]. In our study, biological sex determination by peptide analysis was successful for all four juvenile samples, including a small child sample where the aDNA analysis failed. ...
... In terms of fire-related evidence, while it is widely accepted that AMH had the ability to create, maintain and use fire in complex ways; the evolution of fire as a technology in the Upper Palaeolithic (henceforth UP) has remain vastly unexplored. Most of the current studies into UP fire use and pyrotechnology have focused on individual sites (Bosch et al. 2012;Braadbaart et al. 2020;Fladerer et al. 2014;Karkanas et al. 2004;Schiegl et al. 2003;White et al. 2017) or variations in hearth components like fuel sources (Buonasera et al. 2019;Costamagno et al. 2009;Henry and Théry-Parisot 2014;Marquer et al. 2010;Théry-Parisot et al. 2005;Yravedra et al. 2016;Yravedra and Uzquiano 2013). Moreover, the wide methodological variety in excavation strategies, sampling methods, descriptions and regional research biases has further limited larger-scale reviews of UP pyrotechnology. ...
... Application of bulk isotope analysis of food residues can distinguish between foods originating in aquatic environments, which have higher δ 15 N values than terrestrial resources (Heron & Craig, 2015). Stable isotope analysis of individual fatty acids is also possible on lipids extracted from both adhered food residues and lipids absorbed into ceramic fabrics (Anderson et al., 2017;Craig et al., 2013;Heron & Craig, 2015;Taché & Craig, 2015). ...
... The main distinction is between volume -such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -and surface techniques, e.g. laser scanning, structured light scanning, and digital photogrammetry (13,(60)(61)(62). ...
... They have been widely studied in archaeological contexts, providing useful information about diet or past technology and mainly focusing in ecofacts and artifacts, such as pottery (Lucquin et al. 2007;Namdar et al. 2009;Rafferty 2006); rocky surfaces (Buonasera 2016), mummies and human remains (Evershed et al. 1995;Gülacara et al. 1990) and natural bitumens, plant resins and plant pyrolysis products (Dudd and Evershed 1999;Regert et al. 2003;Pollard et al. 2017). The study of lipid biomarkers in archaeological sedimentary contexts is more recent (Birk et al. 2012;Buonasera et al. 2015;Collins et al. 2017;Connolly et al. 2019;Égüez et al. 2020;Leierer et al. 2019Leierer et al. , 2020Sistiaga et al. 2011Sistiaga et al. , 2014Prost et al. 2017) and is starting to show its potential as a geoarchaeological tool for approaching past human societies and their environments. ...
... In this issue, two researchers generate their own experimental data to use with models derived from HBE. Palazzolo engages in experimental acorn processing using stone mortars he created. Building upon the work of Buonasera (2015Buonasera ( , 2019, Palazzolo measures the grinding rates of student volunteers using mortars of varying dimensions. These data have utility for technological investment models as well as any foraging models that take acorn processing rates into account. ...