T.E. Robinson's research while affiliated with University of Michigan and other places

Publications (6)

Article
The question of addiction concerns the process by which drug-taking behavior, in certain individuals, evolves into compulsive patterns of drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior that take place at the expense of most other activities, and the inability to cease drug-taking, that is, the problem of relapse. In this paper we summarize one view of this...
Article
What roles do mesolimbic and neostriatal dopamine systems play in reward? Do they mediate the hedonic impact of rewarding stimuli? Do they mediate hedonic reward learning and associative prediction? Our review of the literature, together with results of a new study of residual reward capacity after dopamine depletion, indicates the answer to both q...
Article
This paper presents a biopsychological theory of drug addiction, the 'Incentive-Sensitization Theory'. The theory addresses three fundamental questions. The first is: why do addicts crave drugs? That is, what is the psychological and neurobiological basis of drug craving? The second is: why does drug craving persist even after long periods of absti...

Citations

... In individuals diagnosed with AUD, habit indicates that continued use can occur after alcohol is no longer rewarding or desirable, such that individuals continue to drink sometimes even without conscious awareness (Ray, 2012). Several reviews point to the importance of habit as a relevant reward-related mechanism (Berridge & Robinson, 2006;Lettieri, 1985;Reilly et al., 2017;Xiao et al., 2015). Habit has identifiable neurobiological underpinnings in the dorsal striatum, which is implicated in reward processing (Everitt et al., 2008). ...
... From a process-based perspective, Perales et al. (2020, p. 772) proposed that "the addictive process can be defined as a transition between behavioral control modes", which consist in goal-directed and stimulus-driven modes (akin to "liking" and "wanting" systems of the incentive sensitization theory [Robinson & Berridge, 2001], or "model-based" and "model-free" control from the reinforcement learning model [O'Doherty, Cockburn, & Pauli, 2017]). Should the pathogenesis of addictive behaviors imply a dynamic transition between control modes, exploring potentially "static" etiological factors associated with CSBD (such as neurobiological and/or dispositional underpinnings) may provide limited insight regarding involved etiological processes. ...
... BAS-related approach motivation is the "impulse to go toward" (Harmon-Jones et al., 2013 p. 291). It is a dopamine-mediated, wanting state (Berridge & Robinson, 1998;Depue & Collins, 1999;DeYoung, Peterson, & Higgins, 2005;Panksepp, 1998) that can eagerly latch onto diverse cues, concrete or abstract, positive or negative (e.g., even in anger or hate; Carver & Harmon-Jones, 2009;Elnakouri, Hubley, & McGregor, 2022;Harmon-Jones & Gable, 2018), and confer energy, confidence, and tenacity (Harmon-Jones et al., 2013;McGregor et al., 2010, b, Study 3). It is intuitive to link relatively approach-motivated states to concrete desires for sensual pleasure (e.g., "I want pie!"). ...
... It has been suggested the visualisation of HED foods or food cues activates reward pathways within brain regions (Berridge, 2009;Volkow & Wise, 2005). This concept stems from the incentive sensitization theory (Franken, 2003;Robinson & Berridge, 1993), which suggests that sensitization of the dopaminergic reward system increases the salience of reward related cues in the environment (e.g. HED foods), making them more appealing, thereby promoting cravings and consumption (Nijs & Franken, 2012;Robinson & Berridge, 2003). ...