T. Kapurusinghe's scientific contributions

Publications (12)

Article
Full-text available
We determined the genetic diversity of the Green Turtle Chelonia mydas (Linneaus, 1758) nesting at Kosgoda rookery, the second largest sea turtle aggregation on the southwestern coast of Sri Lanka. Skin tissue samples were collected from 68 nesting females and genetic diversity was estimated using six microsatellite loci. High genetic diversity was...
Article
Full-text available
We determined the genetic diversity of the Green Turtle Chelonia mydas (Linneaus, 1758) nesting at Kosgoda rookery, the second largest sea turtle aggregation on the southwestern coast of Sri Lanka. Skin tissue samples were collected from 68 nesting females and genetic diversity was estimated using six microsatellite loci. High genetic diversity was...
Article
Full-text available
Reproductive output provides data fundamental to the conservation and management of sea turtles. Five years of data on the reproductive output of female green turtles was collected from Kosgoda beach, the second largest sea turtle rookery in Sri Lanka. Egg size, clutch size, clutch frequency, female size, hatchling size, hatching success, nest dept...
Article
Full-text available
Adult sea turtles have multiple mates, but the frequency of multiple paternity varies between rookeries and among species. Multiple mating can influence the strength of sexual selection, the effective population size, genetic variability and introgression within a population. We determined paternity in the offspring of 19 female Green Sea Turtles (...
Data
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Satellite transmitters were deployed on ten green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in Rekawa Sanctu-ary (RS-80.851°E 6.045°N), Sri Lanka, during 2006 and 2007 to determine inter-nesting and migratory behaviours and foraging habitats. Nine turtles subsequently nested at RS and demonstrated two inter-nesting strategies linked to the location of their...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on nesting behaviour of turtles provide the most important information on their reproduction by providing estimates of female population size. Kosgoda, located in the southwest coast of Sri Lanka, has a year-round nesting rookery which is visited by five species of sea turtles, the green turtle being the most frequent visitor. Nesting behav...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal inhabitants in Sri Lanka believe that the number of nesting turtles increases during the full moon days. Also the tidal rhythm of the sea is directly correlated with the lunar cycle. This study was carried out to find the correlation of lunar cycle and the daily tidal rhythm with the number of nesting turtles. The lunar cycle and the daily...
Article
Full-text available
There are seven species of marine turtles living in the world and five come ashore to nest in Sri Lanka. All those five species are nesting on Rekawa beach and they are under threat of egg poaching. For a long time Rekawa villagers have collected all the turtle eggs for sale or local consumption. The main objective of this programme was conserving...

Citations

... Research on Sri Lankan turtles are restricted to few populations in beaches identified as turtle hotspots such as Kosgoda, Rekawa, Godawaya and Bundala National Park (March for Conservation, 1983;Richardson, 1995;Hewavisenthi, 1990;Kapurusinghe, 1998;Kapurusinghe. and Ekanayaka, 2000;Ekanayake, et al., 2002;Ekanayake, 2003;Ekanayake and Ranawana, 2004). Even at the aforementioned sites most of the studies have been carried out in order to document various aspects of the turtle nesting biology with few attempts being made to study the ecological conditions of prominent turtle nesting beaches in Sri Lanka. ...
... In the Maldives, turtle hunting is increasingly uncommon whereas the harvesting and consumption of eggs remains common (IOSEA, 2019). In the last half of the twentieth century, the communities at Rekawa beach, Sri Lanka, collected most of the turtle eggs laid on the beach, for sale and local consumption and the harvesting of turtles for meat was common in other parts of Sri Lanka (Ekanayake et al., 2002). A survey conducted in 2007 found consumptive use of turtle meat and eggs had significantly reduced, and noted that nesting rates were high in areas, such as Rekawa, that now had community-based protection of nests (Rajakaruna et al., 2009). ...
... However, CMR data collected at focal tagging sites are not always consistent with this pattern. While some high-fidelity females are recaptured multiple times in a season (up to 6-10 times, depending on the species), the majority of females at many globally distributed tagging sites are encountered only once, resulting in average clutch frequencies that are closer to 2 rather than 4 or 5 (e.g., Alvarado-Díaz et al. 2003;Rivalan et al. 2006;Tucker 2010;Frey et al. 2014;Ekanayake et al. 2016). Given the discrepancy between what we expect and what we observe and the ramifications of generating inaccurate estimates of clutch frequency (see below), it is critical to evaluate potential sources of bias in CMR datasets collected at focal tagging sites. ...
... Polygyny is rarely reported in marine turtles but has recently been documented in two hawksbill populations (Natoli et al., 2017; the present study), raising the possibility that this mating strategy may be influenced by species-level differences in mating behavior. For instance, polygyny has not been reported for green turtles (Chelonia mydas) (e.g., Lee and Hays, 2004;Ekanayake et al., 2013;Chassin-Noria et al., 2017) and males of this species are known to vigorously latch onto female turtles and undergo mate guarding for days or even weeks at a time when mating (Cuadrado, 2002;Martínez, 2003;Owens and Blanvillain, 2013). This behavior typically occurs during the early portion of the nesting season, when females are physiologically receptive (Booth and Peters, 1972;Owens and Blanvillain, 2013). ...
... That is why the olive ridley turtle has such a high mortality rate. This species has a very shallow nest and if the eggs are laid down deep enough, the hatching success decreases (Rajakaruna et al., 2013). The ideal place for the protection of turtles is a guarded beach with a hatchery covered by a net against predators and partially shaded. ...
... Despite their conservation value and the importance of Sri Lankan beaches for their sustained survival, little progress has been made on scientific research on marine turtle nesting habitats along the shores of the island. Research is restricted to a few populations at beaches identified as turtle hotspots in southern Sri Lanka, such as Kosgoda (Ekanayake et al., 2010), Rekawa (Kapurusinghe, 1998;Ekanayake et al., 2001), Godawaya , Kalametiya (Kapurusinghe, 2006), Bundala National Park (NP) (Kapurusinghe, 2006), Yala NP (Kapurusinghe, 2006), Kumana NP, Panama and Komari (Ellepola et al., 2014). As noted by Perera et al. (2005), most of these studies focused on the biology of each species but paid little attention to the ecological conditions of turtle nesting habitats. ...
... green turtles: Hamann et al. 2002, Chambault et al. 2016, Page-Karjian et al. 2020; hawksbill turtles Eretmochelys imbricata: Santos et al. 2010, Walcott et al. 2012, Goldberg et al. 2013; leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea: Plot et al. 2013, Asada et al. 2022. Nevertheless, at sites where food is available, inter-nesting turtles may opportunistically feed, as observed for example among leatherback (Asada et al. 2022) and green turtles (Hays et al. 2002b, Richardson et al. 2013. ...